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eBook The Number: A Completely Different Way to Think About the Rest of Your Life download

by Lee Eisenberg

eBook The Number: A Completely Different Way to Think About the Rest of Your Life download ISBN: 0786286156
Author: Lee Eisenberg
Publisher: Thorndike Pr (June 21, 2006)
Language: English
Pages: 495
ePub: 1329 kb
Fb2: 1467 kb
Rating: 4.9
Other formats: txt rtf azw rtf
Category: Work and Money
Subcategory: Personal Finance

From Wall Street to Main Street USA, THE NUMBER means different things to different people.

He was "half-in, half-out of the workplace" with an enviable consulting position at Time, In. and with a family comfortably settled in the suburbs. That's when he received an unexpected offer from the Wisconsin-based Lands' End company that, in the end, he couldn't resist. It meant uprooting his family and moving to the rural heartland, and an entirely new way of life. From Wall Street to Main Street USA, THE NUMBER means different things to different people.

The Number is no ordinary finance book-it offers an intriguing and entertaining tour of weath gurus, life .

The Number is no ordinary finance book-it offers an intriguing and entertaining tour of weath gurus, life coaches, and financial advisers, and our hopes and fears for the future. The result is a provocative field guide to your psyche and finances and an urgently useful book for anyone over thirty. Backed by imaginative reporting and insights, Eisenberg urges people to assume control and responsibility for their standard of living, and take greater aim on their long-term aspirations.

Электронная книга "The Number: A Completely Different Way to Think About the Rest of Your Life", Lee Eisenberg. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "The Number: A Completely Different Way to Think About the Rest of Your Life" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

Use features like bookmarks, note taking and highlighting while reading The Number: A Completely Different Way to Think . Eisenberg's arc through life could be used to define the baby boom.

Use features like bookmarks, note taking and highlighting while reading The Number: A Completely Different Way to Think About the Rest of Your Life. In the 1990s, he wrote books on finding the good life through golf and fishing, and at the end of the decade, he joined an Internet retailer.

Eisenberg's first book was The Number, A Completely Different Way to Think About the Rest of Your Life. Published in 2006, The Number looks at how people prepare for retirement and urges readers to consider framing the question of how much they will need in terms of personal satisfaction. The book was listed on numerous national bestseller lists, including The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, Business Week, and USA Today. Sneaky Feats: The Art of Showing Off and 53 Ways To Do It (co-author, with Tom Ferrell) (1975). Giant Book of Sneaky Feats: The Art of Showing Off and 102 New Ways To Do It (co-author, with Tom Ferrell) (1980).

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In this smart, engaging book, Lee Eisenberg, best-selling author of The Number: A Completely Different Way to. .

In this smart, engaging book, Lee Eisenberg, best-selling author of The Number: A Completely Different Way to Think about the Rest of Your Life, leads us on a provocative and entertaining tour of America's love/hate affair with shopping, a pursuit that, even in hard times, remains a true national pastime.

Eisenberg's book is not an investment guide, but rather something wholly original: a revealing look behind our .

Eisenberg's book is not an investment guide, but rather something wholly original: a revealing look behind our most common financial and emotional conflicts and how we can begin to get a grip on them. Eisenberg gives each reader a unique and unprecedented tool with which to virtually craft his or her future. This encompassing book is a priceless, step-by-step prelude to initiating, or continuing, discussions with a qualified financial advisor. The bottom line for The Number is that Eisenberg offers each reader a fresh and promising beginning to the rest of his or her life.

Eisenberg is the author of several books, including The Number: A Completely Different Way to Think About the Rest of Your Life, which appeared on many national bestseller lists. His latest book is The Point Is: Birth, Death, and Everything in Between, published in February, 2016 by Twelve Books, an imprint of the Hachette Book Group. YouTube Encyclopedic.

G. T. F. Trust N/A. Privacy N/A. Child safety N/A. thenumberbook.

Describes how the author successfully secured his family's financial future by changing jobs and moving halfway across the country, sharing the stories of numerous baby boomers that offer insight into achieving key financial goals.
Comments: (7)
adventure time
Most retirement books focus on the amount of money that one will need to retire, taking into account personal circumstances. And they pretty much all attempt to crack the whip, noting that most Americans need to save more -- usually far more -- than they currently are. This book does all of this admirably well. However, this work also attempts to get the reader thinking about why they want to retire. Is it simply to be free of a workday or is there some greater meaning, some greater goal, for this time in life? What will make us happy and financially is that reasonable? It is the marriage of fulfillment and finance on which we need to focus. Most of the discussion of this aspect comes in the final fifth of this book. I wish that it would have been more dominant, but that the topic was raised at all sets this book apart from most.

While not perfect, I would recommend this book over most like it. It at least prods the reader to ask the right questions.
Nalaylewe
As a relatively younger person about to leave the workforce I've been reading quite a bit on early retirement. This book ranks well into my top 3 - while not a financial book specifically the author is really engaging and smart about life after the accumulation stage. Enjoyed the writing style too.
Soustil
I usually don't provide negative reviews, but beware of this book.

This book is a 200 page rant about the waste and fraud in the retirement financial planning industry. According to the author, the industry is set up to take advantage of boomers who are too dumb to know what to do when they retire.

Yet, the book provides no useful retirement information itself. On the the last page of 200+, he finally gets around to telling you that there is no Number anyway. It's a illusion, for all you suckers who bought this book. Too late now, no returns are available.

If, in the author's opinion, you're a real stooge, you can actually calculate your retirement number. Take your expected retirement income and take 4%. Live on that, he says. But it's more important to find your meaning in life. Money doesn't matter.

It seems rather odd that the author calls other retirement planners frauds. Talk about "the Pot Calling the Kettle Black".
Kezan
Great read by somebody not in the financial industry. He is a journalist and editor, so the book is thoroughly researched. He is funny as heck, so, the book will keep you entertained as you read. While is he not a financial specialist, he really knows the business well. He helps you understand the business so that when you deal with the wall street guys and insurance guys, you will be a smarter and more informed client. It's a great wakeup call for anybody in their 30s, 40s, and 50s, who are approaching retirement and need sound guidance on what to do and how to figure out the right path. Most importantly, it's a good test for your own values, so you can figure out for yourself what is important to you and how to spend the rest of your life. So, it deals not only with money, retirement, and investing, but also with how you invest your time - or the amount of time you have left here on earth. Very well done, give it to somebody you care about or somebody who needs financial direction for retirement, saving, life insurance, etc.
Tiainar
This book is both entertaining and thought-provoking. It's a quick read and the author's constant insertion of wit and clever turn-of-phrase keep it light-hearted. As a retirement planning guide, it is noticeably lacking in concrete advice. It really does not tell you where to invest or how much. The book is really more philosophical than financial. The author argues that there is more to a successful retirement than amassing a large stash of money. With life-spans ever increasing, many of us will spend a quarter or more of our lives in retirement. Having enough money to fund those years is certainly important, but there is also the question of what to do with those years, besides just waiting for them to end. I've read other retirement books and been to the major retirement planning websites and met with financial planners, but the point is well taken. No one has ever asked me what I want to do with the rest of my life. I planned for college in high school, graduate school while in college and my career while in graduate school. I have detailed plans for advancing my career. I can tell you with some precision what I hope to achieve this year or in the next five or the next ten. This book made me realize that I really have no idea what to do the day after my last day of work. And while many planners will confabulate a "number" of dollars you need to retire with financial security, these numbers are very dependant upon what you want to do with your time. If your goal for retirement is spending time at your mortgage-free beach house and soaking up the sun while you relax, you won't need as much money as if your goal is to travel the world. And if your goal is to travel the world, there are various ways of doing this at various expense levels. The fundamental question isn't as much of how much money you have or need as to what you want to do with the next phase of life. The author urges you to address this question first. Once you have an idea of what you hope to do and accomplish, you have a basis for establishing a plan for achieving it (and, of course, financing it.) Approaching retirement with no plan is probably a recipe for disappointment. This book failed to give me any answers, but it did prompt me to start asking myself a different set of questions. The author could have achieved this more concisely. However, a few dozen clever puns, double entendre, and witticisms, make this book entertaining even at this length and decidely worth the small investment of time and money it takes to read it.