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by Frank Webster

eBook Theories of the Information Society (International Library of Sociology) download ISBN: 0415406323
Author: Frank Webster
Publisher: Routledge; 1 edition (October 31, 2006)
Language: English
Pages: 324
ePub: 1787 kb
Fb2: 1642 kb
Rating: 4.9
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Category: Work and Money
Subcategory: Management and Leadership

Information is regarded as a distinguishing feature of our world. Where once economies were built on industry and conquest. Frank Webster has been Professor of Sociology at Oxford Brookes University, the University of Birmingham and City University London.

Information is regarded as a distinguishing feature of our world. Series: International Library of Sociology.

In Theories of the Information Society Frank Webster sets out to make sense of the information explosion, taking a. .

In Theories of the Information Society Frank Webster sets out to make sense of the information explosion, taking a sceptical look at what thinkers mean when they refer to the Information Society, and critically examining the major post-war theories and approaches to informational development.

Start by marking Theories of the Information Society as Want to Read .

Start by marking Theories of the Information Society as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. This book is essential reading for students of contemporary social theory and anybody interested in social and technological change in the post-war era. It addresses issues of central concern to students of sociology, politics, communications, information science, cultural studies, computing and librarianship. Books by Frank Webster.

Frank Webster has been Professor of Sociology at Oxford Brookes University, the University of.Библиографические данные. Theories of the Information Society International Library of Sociology.

Frank Webster has been Professor of Sociology at Oxford Brookes University, the University of Birmingham and City University London. Издание: 4, исправленное.

International Library of Sociology (Paperback). By (author) Frank Webster. This interdisciplinary book is essential reading for those trying to make sense of social and technological change in the post-war era. It addresses issues of central concern to students of sociology, politics, geography, communications, information science, cultural studies, computing and librarianship. Format Paperback 404 pages.

Frank Webster But just what does this mean? In Theories of the Information Society Frank .

Information has come to be regarded as a symbol of the age in which we live. Talk nowadays is of an & technology' revolution, even of an & society'. But just what does this mean? In Theories of the Information Society Frank Webster sets out to make sense of the information explosion. He examines and assesses a variety of & of the information society', and takes a sceptical look at what thinkers mean when they do refer to an & society'. Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read.

Frank Webster (born 27 September 1950) is a British sociologist. In Theories of the Information Society, he examined six analytically separable conceptions of the information society, arguing that all are suspect, so much so that the idea of an information society cannot be easily sustained.

information has become a distinguishing feature of the modern world. About the author (2002). The international library of sociology Theories of the information society.

Where once economies were built on industry and conquest, we are now instead said to be part of a global information economy. Frank Webster is Professor of Sociology at City University, UK. Bibliographic information. Theories of the Information Society International library of sociology The international library of sociology Theories of the information society.

Information Society - International Library of Sociology (Paperback).

Theories of the Information Society - International Library of Sociology (Paperback). Frank Webster (author). In Theories of the Information Society Frank Webster sets out to make sense of the information explosion, taking a sceptical look at what thinkers mean when they refer to the Information Society, and critically examining the major post-war approaches to informational development.

Coping in an era of information flows, of virtual relationships and breakneck change poses challenges to one and all.

In Theories of the Information Society Frank Webster makes sense of the information explosion, taking a sceptical look at what thinkers mean when they refer to the 'Information Society' and critically examines the major post-war theories and approaches to informational development. This thirdedition brings the book right up to date with bothnew theoretical work and, social and technological changes (such as the rapid growth of the Internet and accelerated globalization), reassessing the work of key theorists in light of these changes.

This bookis essential reading for students of contemporary social theory and anybody interested in social and technological change in the post-war era. It addresses issues of central concern to students of sociology, politics, communications, information science, cultural studies, computing and librarianship.

Comments: (6)
Pooker
This book is a college graduate-level (perhaps precocious upper undergrad) critical introduction to various information society theories. The author admits early on that he does not believe we have entered a new "information age" even as he concedes various points--sometimes quite important points--that there have been big changes in society because of changes in technology, networks, and information flows. As a result of his stated biases, he sometimes comes across as more critical of those he doesn't agree with (Bell, Castells, etc.) than those he does (Giddens, etc.), although in each chapter he does try to show a critical perspective of each scholars' theories.

There are two main strengths to this book. First, it gives a very nice "lay of the land" overview of many important social theorists regarding the information age, and thus is an excellent launching point for students who want to explore theorists further. Second, his skepticism regarding theories of information society should be welcomed even by those who do firmly believe that we are in an information society. He raises many interesting points that will give those people who largely buy into the information society beliefs (as I did moreso before reading this book) cause to rethink some assumptions, which is what scholarly activity is supposed to be about.
Xangeo
A truly excellent survey of the theoretical works that deal with the alleged rise of "the information society." The author is suitably critical of the work being reviewed and takes his own positions on many key issues. I first encountered the book when sitting in on another professor's graduate seminar.
Ichalote
Excellent reference book regarding the known theories of information society. Well written and an easy read. Absolutely loved the examples the author uses to help make the content relevant and understood.
Rocksmith
This book by an Oxford sociologist may bring tears, if not frustration, to Internet geeks, and information policy wonks alike. Be forewarned!
With so much hyperbole surrounding the computing revolution, the Internet, and the explosion in communications, it is easy to forget that most of us simply assume that a new information either now exists or is emerging. The author of this book challenges this assumption by looking at half a dozen views of the so-called information society advanced by different sociologists in recent decades. Webster in particular seems to distinguish the positions of classical socilogists like Schiller, Giddens, and Habermas from the so-called post-modern or post-industrial writings on information society of Daniel Bell, Manuel Castells, or Mark Poster.By critically examining these views, the author concludes that there is much more information available than ever before and that it plays a pivotal role in everything we do from leisure activities to business transactions to government activities, as shown by the various technical measures of information society which various writers have proposed. However, and this is the clincher, there does not appear to be any consensus of whether the information society exists or exactly what it is supposed to look like as different from previous society.
Is Weber's point and his scepticism simply semantic sophistry or a substantively insightful analysis? Depending on your disposition and your appreciation of sociological literature, this is a question you will have to decide in you choose to follow the argument in this book. The author is hardly naive about the realities of technological change, but deeply questions the technological determinism which he sees many writers and thinkers implicitly assuming is shaping contemporary social relations. He prefers to think of present developments as an extension of the past, but with a greater informatization of social relations.
I suspect that the author's argument is subtle, and possibly valid, but he may have done well to cast his analysis in broader terms than those of an insider debate among sociologists.
Tygolar
An absolute must for anyone interested in the 'Information Society'. Webster tackles the fundamental questions other authors neatly sidestep; primarily, what is meant by the term 'Information Society', what foundation, if any, there is for the widespread acceptance of this 'new society' and an indepth look at alternative theories which stress continuity as opposed to revolution!
On the whole a well balanced, well written, thoughtful account of a very challenging concept.
Mavegar
Buy this book at your peril. The author of this book has, it would appear, done alot of research and he wants you to know it. The book is difficult and language laborious. This might be an ok read for advanced sociologist but for your average computing proffessional or student of computing its a waste of time.