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eBook Investment Gurus: A Road Map to Wealth from the World's Best Money Managers (Selection of Money Book Club) download

by Richard R. Breeden,Andrew Tobias,Peter J. Tanous

eBook Investment Gurus: A Road Map to Wealth from the World's Best Money Managers (Selection of Money Book Club) download ISBN: 0132607204
Author: Richard R. Breeden,Andrew Tobias,Peter J. Tanous
Publisher: Prentice Hall Pr; First Edition edition (February 1, 1997)
Language: English
Pages: 414
ePub: 1363 kb
Fb2: 1537 kb
Rating: 4.8
Other formats: doc azw docx lrf
Category: Work and Money
Subcategory: Investing

Series: Selection of Money Book Club. Hardcover: 414 pages. Tanous's effort is far superior to the other collections of interviews with money managers. Most books of this sub-genre fall into two categories, depending on the author

Series: Selection of Money Book Club. Most books of this sub-genre fall into two categories, depending on the author. The first type of author is usually a journalist who knows little about the disciplines of stock picking and running investment funds, and you are usually hard pressed to find any new insight in their books, because they don't know how to ask their subjects the really insightful questions.

In closing, the author constructs sample "portfolios" of guru-managed mutual funds for the reader's consideration.

Книга Investment Gurus A Road Map to Wealth from the World's Best Money Managers Investment Gurus A Road Map to Wealth from the World's Best Money ManagersКниги Экономика Автор: Peter J. Tanous . happens to the stock"); "momentum" trader Richard Driehaus ("look for earnings surprises") and "Super Mario" Gabelli, who champions "intrinsic private market value. In closing, the author constructs sample "portfolios" of guru-managed mutual funds for the reader's consideration.

Pt. 1. The Landscape. Tools of the Trade - pt. 2. The Gurus. Scott Sterling Johnston. David E. Shaw - pt. 3. The Route. Your Road Map to Wealth. Crafting an Intelligent Personal Investment Plan.

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Full recovery of all data can take up to 2 weeks! So we came to the decision at this time to double the download limits for all users until the problem is completely resolved. Thanks for your understanding! Progress: 9. 4% restored. Главная Investment Gurus A Road Map to Wealth from the World's Best Money Managers. Investment Gurus A Road Map to Wealth from the World's Best Money Managers.

Peter Tanous, Andrew Tobias, Richard C. Breeden. 30,000 first printing.

Peter J. Tanous - 'Investment Gurus - A Road Map To Wealth From The World's Best Money Managers'.

Investment advisor Peter J. Tanous takes readers behind the scenes with Wall Street's . A Road Map to Wealth from the World's Best Money Managers. Books related to Investment Gurus. Tanous takes readers behind the scenes with Wall Street's movers and shakers, going head-to .

Like his previous book Investment Gurus, Investment Visionaries is another great series of interviews with money managers and pioneers.

Peter Joseph Tanous, American investment advisor. Investment Visionaries: A Roadmap to Wealth from the World's Greatest Money Managers. From Peter J. Tanous, author of the critically acclaimed. Trustee Browning School, New York City, 1987-1993; board trustees Lebanese American University.

Interviews with top money managers uncover their techniques for beating the market consistently
Comments: (7)
Ausstan
Picked up good ideas.
Karg
very good
Qusicam
provokes thinking about investment opportunities all around you
Kann
No big secrets here. Informative in the basic knowledge base sense of the industry mentality.
Taulkree
I recently read Investment Gurus, by Peter Tanous. This is one of the most informative and interesting books on investing I've ever read. In the book Mr. Tanous interviews a number of investment professionals who have compiled incredible records over extended periods of time. To balance the opinions raised, he also interviews several academicians who contend the markets are efficient and the most predictable road to investment success is through the use of low cost index funds. One of the interviewees makes a compelling argument that to beat the market averages an investor has to do substantial digging to gain any advantage. The cost of the digging negates the higher returns obtained. It was also pointed out by several of the academicians that studies show no correlation between past and future performance. In other words, those who had exceptional returns in the past, only have a 50 percent chance of repeating this in the future. It should be noted that high (expense ratios) cost funds have a tendency to perform poorly no matter what timeframe you look at.

An interesting side note: The manager of the Brandywine fund was one of the professionals interviewed because his long-term record was exceptional prior to the publishing of the book. If you check the performance of the Brandywine fund recently and it has only been an average performer trailing the S&P 500 substantially over the last year. Maybe there is something to this idea of market efficiency.

One of the active managers with an exceptional record, Laura Sloate, mentioned a couple of stocks during the interview which she felt were bargains and would rise. One was Marvel Entertainment. Ms. Sloate didn't feel it could go much lower than its price then of around $10 a share. Last time I looked Marvel was trading at less than $1 per share. Maybe she did just happen to get lucky in the past. But perhaps she has a good sell discipline which allowed her to get out of the stock before the big fall.

One of the academic interview!ees, Rex Sinquefield, made a interesting quip. He called stock market newsletters "investment pornography," due to their dubious worth. I must say that I have to agree with him. Ninety percent of investment newsletters aren't worth the paper they're printed on.
All in all, I came away reinforced in my belief that individual investors should have the majority of their funds going into index funds, preferably on a dollar cost averaging basis. If you feel compelled to "play" the market, do it with money you can afford to lose and keep track of your returns, or lack thereof. This way you'll discover the futility in trading your way to riches and not suffer as much in the process.
Niwield
Peter Tanous features interviews with 18 individuals he identifies as top, common stock investment consultants - or "gurus." His choices are based on his work as a consultant identifying investment advisers for corporations. The consultants he selected for this book represent the major stock investing approaches as growth, value or momentum investors. The interview format lets them speak for themselves. He briefly introduces the book with a primer on basic investment terms and principles, and a summary of major themes. We at getAbstract find the range of views shown very helpful, but note that the book suffers from overwriting and a lack of focus and editing. Some tightening would help highlight the main points in the long interviews. The introduction and conclusion are long and general, and a clearer, more detailed summary would be very welcome. Yet, the book offers a lot of information for the average serious investor, much of it straight from the mouths of some very important horses.
Whiteseeker
Tanous's effort is far superior to the other collections of interviews with money managers. Most books of this sub-genre fall into two categories, depending on the author. The first type of author is usually a journalist who knows little about the disciplines of stock picking and running investment funds, and you are usually hard pressed to find any new insight in their books, because they don't know how to ask their subjects the really insightful questions. The second type, which I'll call the John Train style, has a sophisticated investor/fund consultant doing the interviews, and can often produce real insight from the interviewees. The problem with many of these books, and Train's in particular, is that the author is often not trying to interview the successful money managers. Instead, authors like Train are often trying to play gotcha! with their interviewees, subjecting them to asinine questions and frequently diverging from the topics that made you buy their book in the first place. The Money Masters by Train is so full of political tangents and Train's forcing his opinion on the likes of Peter Lynch and Warren Buffett that I've wanted to scream at him at some points.
In contrast, Tanous knows how to ask questions that are of interest to professional and serious amateur investors, and he knows how to stay on topic. He does ask every interviewee about the efficient market hypothesis, but that's a theme of his book and can be excused. What you get from Tanous is an interviewer who knows how to ask really penetrating, really revealing questions of the world's best money managers, and the humility to realize that his readers don't want to know what he, Tanous, thinks, but what his interviewees think! What's more, he managed to get interviews with at least two money managers--Bruce Sherman of Private Capital Management and Scott Sterling Johnston of Sterling Johnston Asset Management--that have excellent track records but who speak very, very rarely to the press. There is real value to Tanous's book, and I'm a better investor for having read it. Serious investors should still read Train's books for their revealing interviews with Buffett, Templeton, Lynch and others, but in Tanous's book, you have all the strengths of the Train books without any of the that author's obvious, glaring shortcomings as a writer and interviewer.