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eBook The East Moves West: India, China, and Asia's Growing Presence in the Middle East download

by Geoffrey Kemp

eBook The East Moves West: India, China, and Asia's Growing Presence in the Middle East download ISBN: 0815703880
Author: Geoffrey Kemp
Publisher: Brookings Institution Press; 2 edition (May 3, 2010)
Language: English
Pages: 335
ePub: 1180 kb
Fb2: 1823 kb
Rating: 4.3
Other formats: lit rtf doc txt
Category: Work and Money
Subcategory: Industries

The East Moves West confirms Geoffrey Kemp's reputation as a scholar who combines a broad geopolitical vision with an extraordinarily detailed knowledge of the many bilateral relationships between so many Middle East countries, on the one hand, and so many Asian powers, on th. .

The East Moves West confirms Geoffrey Kemp's reputation as a scholar who combines a broad geopolitical vision with an extraordinarily detailed knowledge of the many bilateral relationships between so many Middle East countries, on the one hand, and so many Asian powers, on the other. It will be of great value to policymakers, journalists, scholars, and students. ― Middle East Policy. Geoffrey Kemp has written a book of startling originality

In addition to India and China, most other Asian countries have growing Middle East connections

Published by: Brookings Institution Press. In addition to India and China, most other Asian countries have growing Middle East connections. This chapter focuses on Pakistan, Japan, and South Korea. India and China will become important actors. Pakistan, Japan, South Korea, and the Central and Southeast Asian countries also will play significant roles.

The East Moves West book. Geoffrey Kemp, a longtime analyst of global security and political economy, compares and contrasts Indian and Chinese involvement in the Middle East. He stresses an embedded historical dimension that gives India substantially more familiarity and interest in the region-India was there first, and it has maintained that head start.

At Carnegie he ran the Middle East Arms Control Program and published and co-authored several books on Middle East . The East Moves West: India, China, and Asia's Growing Presence in the Middle East, Geoffrey Kemp, 2012, ISBN 978-0815703884.

At Carnegie he ran the Middle East Arms Control Program and published and co-authored several books on Middle East security and what he asserted to be growing problems between the United States and Iran. In 1995, Kemp assumed his current position at the Center for the National Interest (formerly the Nixon Center), where he has continued to publish studies on the contemporary Middle East. He also published a textbook with Robert Harkavy, Strategic Geography and the Changing Middle East.

Geoffrey Kemp’s new book, The East Moves West: India, China, and Asia’s Growing . Indeed, it is the continued American presence in the region that allows the Asian powers to avoid choosing sides in Middle Eastern disputes.

Geoffrey Kemp’s new book, The East Moves West: India, China, and Asia’s Growing Presence in the Middle East, is a geopolitical tour de force about what the rise of India, China and Asia broadly mean for Middle Eastern countries as well as for the international relations of the Middle East. The bulk of the book documents the impressive growing interaction among India, China, Pakistan, Japan and South Korea, on the one hand, and the Middle Eastern countries, on the other.

The East Moves West details the growing interdependence of the Middle East and Asia and projects the likely ramifications of this evolving relationship. It also examines the role of Pakistan, Japan, and South Korea in the region

The East Moves West details the growing interdependence of the Middle East and Asia and projects the likely ramifications of this evolving relationship. It also examines the role of Pakistan, Japan, and South Korea in the region. He stresses an embedded historical dimension that gives India substantially more familiarity and interest in the region ?India was there first, and it has maintained that head start.

Geoffrey Kemp directs Regional Strategic Programs at The Nixon Center. The Brooking Institution has just published his latest book, The East Moves West: India, China, and Asia's Growing Presence in the Middle East. Kemp was Senior Director for Near East and South Asian Affairs on the National Security Council during the Reagan Administration. Classroom use of this video is permitted.

During a period when established Western economies are treading water at best, industry and development are exploding in China and India. The world's two most populous nations are the biggest reasons for Asia's growing footprint on other global regions. The impact of that footprint is especially important in the Middle East, given that region's role as an economic and geopolitical linchpin. In The East Moves West, Geoffrey Kemp details the growing interdependence of the Middle East and Asia and projects the likely ramifications of this evolving relationship.

While traditionally powerful Western economies are treading water at best, beset by crises in banking, housing, and employment, industrial growth and economic development are exploding in China and India. The world's two most populous nations are the biggest reasons for Asia's growing footprint on other global regions. The increasing size and impact of that footprint are especially important in the Middle East, an economic, religious, and geopolitical linchpin. The East Moves West details the growing interdependence of the Middle East and Asia and projects the likely ramifications of this evolving relationship. It also examines the role of Pakistan, Japan, and South Korea in the region.

Geoffrey Kemp, a longtime analyst of global security and political economy, compares and contrasts Indian and Chinese involvement in the Middle East. He stresses an embedded historical dimension that gives India substantially more familiarity and interest in the region—India was there first, and it has maintained that head start. Both nations, however, are clearly on the rise and leaving an indelible mark on the Middle East, and that enhanced influence has international ramifications for the United States and throughout the world.

Does the emergence of these Asian giants—with their increasingly huge need for energy—strengthen the case for cooperative security, particularly in the maritime arena? After all, safe and open sea-lanes remain an essential component of mutually beneficial intercontinental trade, making India and China increasingly dependent on safe passage of oil tankers. Or will we see reversion to more traditional competition and even conflict, given that the major Asian powers themselves have so many unresolved problems and that the future of the U.S. presence in the area is uncertain. Kemp believes the United States will remain the dominant military power in the region but will have to share some security responsibilities with the Asians, especially in the Indian Ocean.

Comments: (4)
Gaxaisvem
The is an intriguing study of developing trade patterns in Asia. For a student of ancient and medieval history, this is nothing less than the old silk road trade routes coming back to life after centuries of dormancy. Driving that revival is the return to economic vitality and centrality of India and China - as well as Japan and the smaller Asian economies such as Korea, Thailand and the Philippines. The sense of déjà vu is striking for a historian looking at the "longue duree". However, unlike the commodities traded on the old silk road, the commodities now being traded include energy and resources as well as the supply of services, in particular the provision of major construction and infrastructure projects by Chinese and Indian corporations. Rather than being traversed by dhows and camel trains, super tankers and transcontinental pipelines criss cross the new silk road. The author includes an exhaustive catalogue of commodities and projects supplied by and to the Asian giants - reading something like a latter day Marco Polo's Travels.

The author separately studies India and then China,. A chapter is devoted to Japan, South Korea and Pakistan.In the case of India, the author sees the return of India to an area with which it has historically had close connections, noting that during the period of British rule of India, the British dominated the Middle East from Delhi and and not London. In the case of China, the author recalls the historical journey of the Chinese admiral Zheng He into the Indian Ocean in the fifteenth century and sees something of a return of China to the area.

The study concludes with an examination of various strategic scenarios of how the up and coming powers of Asia will work with and against each other in the Indian Ocean and Middle East, a theme developed more fully by Robert Kaplan in Monsoon. He speculates on how these powers will deal with each other as well the how they may engage with the tense politics of the region, noting that thus far, they have avoided any real involvement in regional issues such as the Arab-Israeli conflict - at least for now. For the West, which has in the last two centuries dominated the Middle East, the question is one of having to adapt to the return to their old areas of influence of the great Asian powers, especially India and China, which in the end may supplant the West in the region.

If however one sees the Middle East as mainly a cockpit for great power rivalry, this may miss something more fundamental that is happening. That is the re-assertion by Middle Eastern powers themselves as players in the game, especially Turkey and Iran as centres of power in their own right - and their ability to make their own destinies regardless of what great powers want, as the recent events in Egypt, Tunisia and Libya demonstrate. Great powers often forget how resourceful and effective smaller powers can be in playing off great powers one against the other, in order to maximise their own room for manoeuvre. China and India may have already forgotten that they themselves once did exactly this during the Cold War in steering a course between the two superpowers of that era. If Western or the newer Asian great powers see the Middle East as just a stage for their own power plays and simply as a treasure house of resources awaiting exploitation, it may be that those who upset the apple cart will be Middle Easterners themselves and not rival great powers. They just could have their own ideas about the proper order of things.
Mautaxe
Ok
INvait
Geoff Kemp has been one of the leading commentators/analysts on the Middle East for the last several decades. This book follows in that tradition, and is well worth buying. It has helped my own research immensely.
Mitynarit
This book is full of lies and deciet. It has so many imaginary concepts that shows Jeffry must be on some heavy dope. Don't waist your money.