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eBook The End of Country: Dispatches from the Frack Zone download

by Seamus McGraw

eBook The End of Country: Dispatches from the Frack Zone download ISBN: 0812980646
Author: Seamus McGraw
Publisher: Random House Trade Paperbacks; Reprint edition (July 10, 2012)
Language: English
Pages: 256
ePub: 1541 kb
Fb2: 1122 kb
Rating: 4.3
Other formats: rtf azw lit mbr
Category: Work and Money
Subcategory: Industries

Rich with a sense of place and populated by unforgettable personalities, McGraw tells a tale of greed, hubris, and envy, but also of hope, family, and the land that binds them all together. To tell a great story, you need a great story. has lived a great story.

In The End of Country, journalist and area native Seamus McGraw opens a window on the battle for control of this land .

This book is great on so many levels! Whether you are interested in the environmental issue, the Marcellus Shale or that area of the country, big corporations dealings with individuals, or real life.

That's the beauty of this book

That's the beauty of this book

Seamus McGraw starts his recent book, The End of Country, with the appearance a young woman wearing a nose ring and a leather jacket at the door of his mother’s farmhouse in northeastern Pennsylvania.

Seamus McGraw starts his recent book, The End of Country, with the appearance a young woman wearing a nose ring and a leather jacket at the door of his mother’s farmhouse in northeastern Pennsylvania. Nice land you’ve got here. This refrain echoes through the hills where McGraw grew up, the old coal mining region around Scranton and Wilkes-Barre.

The end of country, Seamus McGraw. But my father, a crack shot with his. p. cm. eISBN: 978-0-679-60431-0. When he changed the oil in his cars or tractor, he would carry the used oil to the nearest chuck hole and dump it in.

The End of Country is important because very little has been written on fracking from the bottom looking up – the . Upon my re-reading, the book still exudes that same initial feeling of a story well told with somewhat forced balance, imbued with insights that only a local could provide.

The End of Country is important because very little has been written on fracking from the bottom looking up – the place where public opinion is formed. It helps fill this gap by presenting the facts as seen through the eyes of an ‘everyman’. McGraw was a reporter of no great accomplishment or geoscience expertise, but he was a keen observer of fracking operations on the ground – and in the minds of his neighbours.

Dispatches from the Frack Zone. Rich with a sense of place and populated by unforgettable personalities, McGraw tells a tale of greed, hubris, and envy, but also of hope, family, and the land that binds them all together.

Rich with a sense of place and populated by unforgettable personalities, McGraw tells a tale of greed, hubris, and envy, but also of hope, family, and the land that binds them all together.

In the fall of 2007, Seamus McGraw’s mother is planting bulbs when a woman drops b. In The End of Country, he delves beneath the issue of leasing to reveal the characters of those most impacted by drilling: Victoria Switzer, a retired school teacher who moved to Dimock to build her dream home; Ken Ely, who quarries bluestone from his farm just uphill of Switzer; and Rosemarie Greenwood, an aging dairy farmer who apologized for not baking muffins because. In this book, readers gain a close-up view of seismic operations and insight into how drillers make decisions.

A rare, honest, beautiful, and, yes, sometimes heartbreaking examination of the echoes of water-powered natural gas drilling-or fracking-in the human community. vivid, personal and emotional. -Minneapolis Star Tribune. Susquehanna County, in the remote northeastern corner of Pennsylvania, is a community of stoic, low-income dairy farmers and homesteaders seeking haven from suburban sprawl-and the site of the Marcellus Shale, a natural gas deposit worth more than one trillion dollars.

“A rare, honest, beautiful, and, yes, sometimes heartbreaking examination of the echoes of water-powered natural gas drilling—or fracking—in the human community . . . vivid, personal and emotional.”—Minneapolis Star Tribune   Susquehanna County, in the remote northeastern corner of Pennsylvania, is a community of stoic, low-income dairy farmers and homesteaders seeking haven from suburban sprawl—and the site of the Marcellus Shale, a natural gas deposit worth more than one trillion dollars. In The End of Country, journalist and area native Seamus McGraw opens a window on the battle for control of this land, revealing a conflict that pits petrodollar billionaires and the forces of corporate America against a band of locals determined to extract their fair share of the windfall—but not at the cost of their values or their way of life. Rich with a sense of place and populated by unforgettable personalities, McGraw tells a tale of greed, hubris, and envy, but also of hope, family, and the land that binds them all together.   “To tell a great story, you need a great story. Seamus McGraw . . . has lived a great story. . . . [He] is just one of its many characters—very real characters—caught up in a very human story in which they must make tough, life-altering decisions for themselves, their community, and ultimately their country.”—Allentown Morning Call   “Compelling . . . The End of Country is like a phone call from a close friend or relative living smack-dab in the middle of the Pennsylvania gas rush. . . . Anyone with even a passing interest in the [fracking debate should] read it.”—Harrisburg Patriot-News   “This cautionary tale should be required reading for all those tempted by the calling cards of easy money and precarious peace of mind.”—Tom Brokaw   “A page-turner . . . McGraw brings us to the front lines of the U.S. energy revolution to deliver an honest and humbling account that could hardly possess greater relevance.”—The Humanist

Comments: (7)
Skillet
I disagree with the reviews that said this book projected the idea that all progress is good. This thoroughly researched narrative certainly lays out all the negatives of hydrofracking, from the obscene noise to the spills of fracking fluids. What I liked is that the author also showed why people signed on the dotted line to allow fracking on their property. And he offers perspective on what natural gas might mean for U.S. energy independence. He doesn't say it comes without a price. And the price can be high.

I felt the pain of these farm residents as they gave away their mineral rights too cheaply and as they suffered from the careless actions of energy companies. The book cut through the data to reveal the human hearts affected by fracking. Highly recommended.
Leceri
Everyone that works in the shale industry, particularly those in Pennsylvania, in which this book takes place, should read this book. It is a very neutral first-hand, journalistic account of the history of the technology and the beginning of the boom in Susquehanna County, PA. I read this in one sitting, as it was so interesting and well written that I found I could not sit it down other than to use the restroom or grab a drink.
Shakar
I just finished reading End of Country and enjoyed it on several levels. I, too, moved back to northern Pennsylvania (9 short years ago) to take care of my parents and the farm, and being a professor 4 miles from our farm has been more-than-a-little exciting, and often confounding. Everything you described brings clarity both to the micro- and macro-political levels of something this big. I probably enjoyed most your keen insight into how this whole Marcellus experience is an opportunity: for individuals, for families,and as citizens, to see if we can listen more to the better angels of our nature than to the current zeitgeist of maximizing greed. I believe this book could be a Pulitzer Prize Winner and will let my graduate students choose it as such. Wish I could send it to all my family members and friends for Christmas--an enjoyable, informative read!
Gribandis
I like that this book doesn't focus solely on the good or the bad of fracking in Pennsylvania, but rather gives you the facts about it. I also appreciate the personal touch it puts on it by telling stories about different people in northeastern PA. Well-rounded view on the subject, I would love to see more of an update in a few years from the same author.
Bludworm
A well-written blow-by-blow account of how landowners in PA have been manipulated by the gas companies to believe the impact of drilling will be minimal, when in fact it changes the whole character of the countryside and the community. If you want to understand more about hydrofracking read this book.
Arashilkis
McGraw takes a very personal view of hydrofracking that is occurring in eastern Pennsylvania, approaching the topic from the point of view of the impact that it is having on the people who live above the Marcellus Shale. I found the book to be balanced and thoughtful, with consideration given both to the environmental effects that drilling and fracking are having on the local community, and on the potential long term repercussions of failing to reasonably exploit energy resources. The technical details he provides are easy to understand, and provide a solid background for the real story he's telling here.

And the real story is where this book truly shines. McGraw breathes life into the characters who are most affected by the discovery and exploiitation of the natural gas reserves in the Marcellus shale, his friends and neighbors. The environmental impact of the drilling, the financial impact of the money that follows energy reserves, the way it affects the careers of geologists and scientists are all considered; it is obvious that he cares deeply about his community. And again, it's a balanced picture that he provides, showing the strengths and the flaws of the people he writes about. The only possible complaint I have about the book is that I would have loved to read more about the people.

I would definitely recommend this book. I found it to be very well written, and the view it gives of the human side of energy policy is thought provoking.
Lbe
On the surface, it seems like there's only two positions on the Marcellus Shale: There's the shrill cry of the environmentalist saying `the cost is too great,' and then there's the call of the loon saying `drill, baby, drill.'

I've always been in the first camp. Now, after reading "The End of Country," I've got to confess that I've moved my tent to somewhere in the middle.

That's the beauty of this book. Author Seamus McGraw doesn't attempt to lay everything out in black-and-white, because he recognizes what most people don't: there are far too many shades of gray. And he points out those shades in a narrative that's informative, intimate, and funny. This isn't just another book about energy. It's a story about people's lives, and how those lives can be changed by events set in motion millennia ago.

The question of where we get our energy is one of the most important issues facing not just the country, but the world. Oil is running out, coal is dirty, and nuclear poses significant risks. While we need to pursue solar, wind, and other alternative sources, we have to find a middle ground to meet our needs in the meantime. It's not a simple question of "To frack, or not to frack."

For the people living along the Marcellus Shale, the discovery of vast deposits of natural gas underneath their feet has the power to save failing farms and replace poverty with prosperity. For the rest of us, it has the potential to provide a bridge between fossil fuels and more sustainable energy sources. Only time will tell if the cost is worth the temporary reward. Follow along as McGraw and the residents of a little corner of Susquehanna County, Pa., begin their journey to find out.