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by Harold Innis

eBook The Bias of Communication, 2nd Edition download ISBN: 0802096069
Author: Harold Innis
Publisher: University of Toronto Press; 2nd edition (September 1, 2008)
Language: English
Pages: 304
ePub: 1971 kb
Fb2: 1702 kb
Rating: 4.8
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Category: Work and Money
Subcategory: Industries

I find everything I read by Harold Innis deeply thought provoking.

I find everything I read by Harold Innis deeply thought provoking.

by Harold Innis (Author). The 13-digit and 10-digit formats both work. I find everything I read by Harold Innis deeply thought provoking.

The Bias of Communication book. Published April 23rd 1999 by University of Toronto Press (first published October 28th 1964). The Bias of Communication. 0802068391 (ISBN13: 9780802068392). In the book, Innis redefines the classification of Empires (like Egypt, Byzantium, the 20th century US) by categorizing the way in which they harness technology to create a media network of information used to influence people and spread ideas.

Harold Adams Innis (November 5, 1894 – November 8, 1952) was a professor of political economy at the University of Toronto and the author of seminal works on Canadian economic history and on media and communication theory. He helped develop the staples thesis, which holds that Canada's culture, political history and economy have been decisively influenced by the exploitation and export of a series of staples such as fur, fish, wood, wheat, mined metals and fossil fuels.

First published in 1951, this masterful collection of essays explores the relationship between a society's communication media and that community's ability to maintain control over its development. Innis considers political and economic forces in the context of social change and the role of communication in the creation of both ancient and modern empires.

The works of Harold Innis are seminal in the study of Canadian history; the essays in this volume continue to generate intense dabate among historians, communications scholars, and media theorists.

It is a collection of essays by one of Canada’s greatest historians, on a subject that opened broad new avenues of thought on the role of media in the creation of history. The works of Harold Innis are seminal in the study of Canadian history; the essays in this volume continue to generate intense dabate among historians, communications scholars, and media theorists.

Fifty years after his death, Harold Innis remains one of the most widely cited but least understood of communication theorists. This is particularly true in relation to his concept of 'bias'. This paper reconstructs this concept and places it in the context of Innis' uniquely non-Marxist dialectical materialist methodology. In so doing, the author emphasises ongoing debates concerning Innis' work and demonstrates its utility in relation to contemporary analyses of the Internet and related developments. Do you want to read the rest of this article? Request full-text.

The bias of communication. by. Innis, Harold . 1894-1952. University of Toronto Press. inlibrary; printdisabled; trent university;. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Trent University Library Donation.

One of the most influential books ever published in Canada, Harold A. Innis's The Bias of Communication has played a major part in reshaping our understanding of history, communication, and media theory. First published in 1951, this masterful collection of essays explores the relationship between a society's communication media and that community's ability to maintain control over its development. Innis considers political and economic forces in the context of social change and the role of communication in the creation of both ancient and modern empires.

In an essay for this new edition, Innis biographer Alexander John Watson examines the reasons why Innis, at the height of his success as an economic historian, embarked on new research areas of communications and empire, as well as the ways in which Marshall McLuhan's interpretations of Innis changed and de-politicized Innis's work.

As important today as it was when first published, The Bias of Communication is essential reading for historians and scholars of communication and media studies.

Comments: (2)
salivan
I find everything I read by Harold Innis deeply thought provoking. Even when he quotes what I feel are wrong headed observations by Marcel Granet or Winston Churchill on character based langauges where I feel his conjectures reflect the fact he had never experienced learning such a language or thinking in one [instead of encouraging mental inflexibility, I would say, the contrary is true - 'lateral thinking' represented a concept I would never had had to introduce for any of my Chinese students], he feels so honest and so undogmatic, he is stimulating rather than irritating. [The passage occurs in 'A Plea For Time', one of the interesting essays in this book.]
He does not dogmatise but stimulates. He does not seek to preach but to help us participate in an ongoing process. In a way, he makes me feel, reading him, as I think a young Greek might have felt who had had the chance to spend time listening to Socrates.
I am very enthusiastic about this book and treasure my copy. I have become deeply interested in everything by Innis I can find.
Captain America
This book and its ideas have stayed with me over 15 years since university : Innis (who influenced Mcluhan) discusses the effect of changes in media on the history of civilization : ex. the invention of papyrus. sometimes obscure, but always a paradigm-shifter