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by Steven M. Sheffrin,Marla Dresch

eBook Who Pays for Development Fees and Exactions? download ISBN: 0965318478
Author: Steven M. Sheffrin,Marla Dresch
Publisher: Public Policy Institute of California (June 1, 1997)
Language: English
Pages: 100
ePub: 1177 kb
Fb2: 1522 kb
Rating: 4.8
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Category: Work and Money
Subcategory: Economics

Perceptions and attitudes in taxpayer compliance. SM Sheffrin, RK Triest. California Davis-Institute of Governmental Affairs Papers, 1991. Who pays for development fees and exactions? M Dresch, SM Sheffrin. Public Policy Instit.

Perceptions and attitudes in taxpayer compliance. Estimating the tax advantage of corporate debt. JJ Cordes, SM Sheffrin. Tax evasion and equity theory: An investigative approach. International Tax and Public Finance 9 (4), 505-521, 2002.

ISBN13:9780965318471.

Who Pays for Development Fees and Exactions?, Marla Dresch and Steven M. Sheffrin. Public Policy Institute of California, June 1997

Who Pays for Development Fees and Exactions?, Marla Dresch and Steven M. Public Policy Institute of California, June 1997. Reform During Crisis: The Transformation of California’s Tax System during the Great Depression, James E. Hartley, Steven M. Sheffrin, and J. David Vasche. Reprinted in the California Constitutional Revision Commission’s Constitution History Revision Perspective, 1996. Estimating the Tax Burden in California, Steven M. Sheffrin and Marla Dresch. California Policy Seminar, 1995. Property Tax Including Proposition 13.

Traditional economic theory assumes rational individuals with stable preferences who, given an array of options and probabilities, maximize their expected utility. Who Pays for Development Fees and Exactions.

Discover Book Depository's huge selection of Steven M Sheffrin books online. Free delivery worldwide on over 20 million titles. Who Pays for Development Fees and Exactions? Marla Dresch. Notify me. Markets and Majorities.

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Dresch, Marla and Steven M. San Francisco, California: Public Policy Institute of California

Dresch, Marla and Steven M. San Francisco, California: Public Policy Institute of California. Using data from Texas, the authors find weak statistical evidence that impact fees decrease the value of undeveloped land. Ihlanfeldt, Keith R. and Timothy M. Shaughnessy.

Executive Director Murphy Institute

Executive Director Murphy Institute. Professor of Economics. Who Pays for Development Fees and Exactions? (with Marla Dresch), Public Policy Institute of California, 1997. Sheffrin Vita p. 5 Published Public Policy Reports.

5 James Nicholas and Arthur Nelson, "Determining the Appropriate Development Impact Fee Using the Rational Nexus Test," Journal of the American Planning Association, Winter 1988, pp. 56-66. Donald C. Shoup, "Regulating Land Use at Sale," Journal of the American Planning Association, Vol. 62, No. 3, Summer, 1996, pp. 354-372.

Steven M. Sheffrin is an economist who focuses on property tax limitations in the United States. He is the Director of Tulane University’s Murphy Institute and a Professor of economics

Steven M. He is the Director of Tulane University’s Murphy Institute and a Professor of economics. Sheffrin is an expert in state taxation and served as a member on Louisiana's state Task Force on the Structural Changes in Budget and Tax Policy in 2016

Exactions are payments made by a developer to local governments for the right to proceed with a project. Exactions can include development fees, the dedication of public land, the construction or maintenance of public infrastructure, or the provision of public services. Developers complain that exactions have become excessive, stifling economic growth. Local government officials argue that these levies are essential to growth: Without them, local government could not provide the infrastructure necessary for new development. Although California leads the nation in imposing fees on new residential development, surprisingly little is known about the nature and effects of these fees—for example, the extent to which they are passed on to consumers in the form of higher home prices. This volume presents the results of an econometric analysis of development fees in Contra Costa County—a county in the San Francisco Bay area that has experienced rapid growth in recent decades.