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eBook History of Economic Analysis download

by Joseph A. Schumpeter

eBook History of Economic Analysis download ISBN: 0195010493
Author: Joseph A. Schumpeter
Publisher: Oxford University Press; Third Printing edition (December 31, 1964)
Language: English
ePub: 1332 kb
Fb2: 1150 kb
Rating: 4.5
Other formats: lit mbr txt lrf
Category: Work and Money
Subcategory: Economics

The History of Economic Analysis is a major contribution to the History of the World Economic Thought by the Austrian Economist Joseph Alois Schumpeter.

The History of Economic Analysis is a major contribution to the History of the World Economic Thought by the Austrian Economist Joseph Alois Schumpeter. We’re dedicated to reader privacy so we never track you.

History of Economic Analysis remains a reflection of Schumpeter's diverse interest in history, philosophy .

History of Economic Analysis remains a reflection of Schumpeter's diverse interest in history, philosophy, sociology, and psychology. To me, that had a very great misconception about the works of Joseph Alois Schumpeter, this book was a revelation, be it for the immensity of his erudiction both as an historian, philosopher and economist, be it for the ingenuity in which he presents many new ideas and perspectives regarding economic analisys.

In this book, Joseph Schumpeter recognized the implication of a gold monetary standard compared to a fiat .

In this book, Joseph Schumpeter recognized the implication of a gold monetary standard compared to a fiat monetary standard. In History of Economic Analysis, Schumpeter stated the following: "An 'automatic' gold currency is part and parcel of a laissez-faire and free-trade economy.

History of Economic Analysis book. At the time of his death in 1950, Joseph Schumpeter-one of the great economists of the first half of the 20th century-was working on his monumental History of Economic Analysis. A complete history of efforts to understand the subject of economics from ancient Greece to the present, this book is an important contribution to the history of ideas as well as to economics.

At the time of his death in 1950, Joseph Schumpeter was working on his monumantal History of Economic Analysis. As well being an economist, Schumpeter was a gifted mathematician, historian, philosopher and psychologist and this is reflected in the multi-disciplinary nature of his great endeavour.

At the time of his death in 1950, Joseph Schumpeter-one of the great economists of the first half of the 20th century-was working on his monumental History of Economic Analysis

Publication Date - March 1996.

Abstract Schumpeter's The History of Economic Analysis, is a tour de force of scholarship. Following the same line of argumentation . Schumpeter, we propose a problem with two apparently antagonistic responses. The display of erudition is truly unbelievable. First, you need to define the relationships established with other economic fields of knowledge that have influenced or have "family resemblance"1. Moreover, it convenient to explain some principles and concepts that dominate the debates in the history of economic analysis [Rammohan, 2005, Kisch, 1979, Swedberg 1995).

Thus opens Schumpeter’s prologue to a section of his 1942 book .

One might think, on the basis of the quote, that Schumpeter was a Marxist. But the analysis that led Schumpeter to his conclusion differed totally from Karl Marx’s. Schumpeter argued with the prevailing view that perfect competition was the way to maximize economic well-being.

Schumpeter's The History of Economic Analysis, is a tour de force of scholarship. Schumpeter’s ideas are treated in relation to widereconomic theorists and theories, especially to Marx and socialism.

Comments: (7)
რฉςh
The objective of Schumpeter, one of the greatest economists of all times, is to portray in a very comprehensive detail, all the philosophical thinking that conduced to contemporary Economic Analisys, since the beginning of the ancient greek thought.

To me, that had a very great misconception about the works of Joseph Alois Schumpeter, this book was a revelation, be it for the immensity of his erudiction both as an historian, philosopher and economist, be it for the ingenuity in which he presents many new ideas and perspectives regarding economic analisys.
He is sometimes difficult to follow, not helped by the many and extensive footnotes he appends the book with, and by the many quotations he does in foreign languages, which he usually do not translate, be it in ancient Greek, Latin , French or German. Also , the book was unfinished in his lifetime and had to be edited by his wife, who was also deceased before the full completion of the giantic task. Even so, the book has some 1.300 pages and covers the full range of all the relevant economic thougth until the time of its publication.
A warning sign of caution must be addressed to the non-professional readers not not fully interested in the magnitude of such a scope, that is, of addressing the formative ideas of each and every important concept in economic analisys in a so complete way. This can be an overkill for you. But if you are interested in Medieval thought, the concepts exposed by , for instance, Saint Thomas and many others, this is a very good reading. Enjoy it
Kelenn
A trully masterfull book from the master of economic analysis!!! The depth of the analysis is unimaginable and for the selected ones who will purchase this book the road of enlightment will be wider.
Gri
Book a little bit damaged in the edges
Acrobat
Joseph Alois Schumpeter (1883-1950) was an Austrian American economist and political scientist. This book was edited by his wife, and published posthumously. She wrote in her Introduction, "He probably began writing the History in 1941... As time went on, he began to emphasize that this was a history of economic analysis and not a history of economic thought." (Pg. vi-vii) Schumpeter himself said, "We shall, of course, never neglect the general environment of economic thought in which, at various times, analysts did their work. But these environments ... are never our main object of interest." (Pg. 39)

He asserts early in the book, "I hold that the garb of philosophy is removable also in the case of economics: economic analysis has not been shaped at any time by the philosophical opinions that economists happened to have, though it has frequently be vitiated by their political attitudes." (Pg. 31) He points out that "The history of economic thought starts from the records of the national theocracies of antiquity ... But the history of economic analysis begins only with the Greeks." (Pg. 52) He states, "in the rising national states public finance acquired not only paramount importance but also a new significance." (Pg. 199)

He states, "there is one point about the gold standard that would redeem it from the charge of foolishness, even in the absence of any purely economic advantage... An 'automatic' gold currency is part and parcel of a laissez-faire and free-trade economy. It links every nation's money rates and price levels with the money rates and price levels of all the other nations that are 'on gold.' It is extremely sensitive to government expenditure ... THIS is the reason why gold is so unpopular now and also why it was so popular in a bourgeois era. It imposes restrictions on governments or bureaucracies that are much more powerful than is parliamentary criticism." (Pg. 405-406)

He says about the period of 1870-1914, "no philosophy can be proved to have influenced the economists of the period in the sense that they arrived at or failed to arrive at any analytic conclusions which they would not have arrived at or failed to arrive at without guidance from any philosopher..." (Pg. 779) Later, he adds, "It is one of the major aims of this book to destroy the myth that there ever has been a time when economists as a body scorned research into historical or contemporaneous fact or when economics as a whole was purely speculative or lacked its factual complement." (Pg. 807)

He concludes, "it is also true that, unintentionally and perhaps even against his will, Keynes gave a mighty impulse ... almost all work in macrodynamics now starts from a 'dynamized' form of his model. In a history of analysis this is still the point to stress. In a history of economic thought Keynes's policy recommendations---time-bound as they were---and certain characteristically Keynes's doctrines---which are losing their hold already---may be much more important." (Pg. 1184)

Although incomplete in certain sections, this massive tome will be of considerable interest to anyone interested in the history of economics.
Vudogal
Schumpeter ,in general, does an excellent job in this book. There is one area where he makes no sense. Following Jacob Viner's erroneous claims made in an article published in the late 1920's,he claims that Smith made NO original contributions to economics.It is incredible that an economist -philosopher of the caliber of Schumpeter would miss this discussion of the risk versus uncertainty distiction given the heavy emphasis and the distinction made between the two concepts by Schumpeter himself.It is quite easy to refute Schumpeter's and Viner's claims. First ,Smith is the first to carefully distinguish decision making under uncertainty and ignorance from risk. See pp. 106-113 of the Modern Library(Cannan) edition of the WN plus p.714,where Smith is the first to reject ordinal and precise numerical conceptions of probability in favor of inequalities and interval valued probabilities. Second, Smith is the first to suggest a mixed probabilistic strategies approach to bargaining in the face of international disputes involving tariffs.See pp.434-439. Third , Smith is the first to emphasize the importance in monetary policy of WHO receives the bank loans, WHAT the loans are to be used for, debt leverage or investment in fixed capital, as opposed to HOW the money is created.See pp. 339-341.
Granigrinn
This book is one of the greats. Written by a master of economic theory, it reflects his learning and insight. But have no mistake, Schumpeter expects you to meet him half-way, so if you like to be spoon-fed and prefer pictures to words, this is not the book for you. The book needs to be read together with the original material: Schumpeter is not a substitute for, but a guide to the material he writes about. To criticise this book for not being light reading is simply to misunderstand this: to understand important thoughts requires some thinking and if you are not prepared to do the work, you shouldn't fool with this book. While Blaug's book is a decent solid survey, the only work which begins to rival Schumpeter's in erudition and incisiveness is Marx's Theories of Surplus-Value, which covers a narrower period. If you respect this book and *really* study it, the effort repays handsomely. Enjoy!