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eBook How Much is Enough?: Buddhism, Consumerism, and the Human Environment download

by Richard K. Payne

eBook How Much is Enough?: Buddhism, Consumerism, and the Human Environment download ISBN: 086171685X
Author: Richard K. Payne
Publisher: Wisdom Publications (March 9, 2010)
Language: English
Pages: 248
ePub: 1733 kb
Fb2: 1583 kb
Rating: 4.9
Other formats: lrf lrf mbr mobi
Category: Work and Money
Subcategory: Economics

Richard K. Payne is Dean and Yehan Numata Professor of Japanese Buddhist Studies at the Institute of Buddhist Studies in Berkeley, California

Richard K. Payne is Dean and Yehan Numata Professor of Japanese Buddhist Studies at the Institute of Buddhist Studies in Berkeley, California.

How Much is Enough? book. The effects of our own decisions and actions on the human environment is examined from several different perspectives, all informed by Buddhist thought

How Much is Enough? book. The effects of our own decisions and actions on the human environment is examined from several different perspectives, all informed by Buddhist thought. The contributors are all simultaneously Buddhist scholars, practitioners, and activists - thus the collection is not simply a conversation between these differing perspectives, but rather demonstrates the integral unity of theory and practice for Buddhism.

Buddhism and the Human Environment by Richard K. Payne . xii. Introduction Just How Much Is Enough? by Richard K. 1 Global Perspectives on the Environment. 23 Conservative Japanese Buddhist Environmentalism in Local and Global Contexts. 33. How much is enough?

How Much is Enough? book.

Consumerist thinking that ownership of more "stuff" equals happiness is not only detrimental to the environment, but .

Consumerist thinking that ownership of more "stuff" equals happiness is not only detrimental to the environment, but completely contrary to Buddhist thought. This collection of essays is derived from a 2003 conference held in California on focusing on Buddhism and the environment during which scholars from both the United States and Japan gathered to examine the connections and disconnections between Buddhist thought and philosophy and the current global consumerist culture.

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125 Snyder, Gary Snyder Reader, 43. 126 Murphy, Place for Wayfaring, 106.

Download book How much is enough?

The massive outpouring of consumer products available today might alone lead one to ask "How much is enough?" But at the same time, if we allow ourselves to see the social, political, economic and environmental consequences of the system that produces such a mass of "goods," then the question is not simply a matter of one's own personal choice, but points to the profound interconnectedness of our day to day decisions about "How much is enough?" The ease with which we can acquire massive quantities of food, clothing, kitchenware, and various electronic goods directly connects each of us with not only environmental degradation caused by strip mining in West Virginia, and with sweat shops and child labor in India or Africa, but also with the ongoing financial volatility of Western capitalist economies, and the increasing discrepancies of wealth in all countries. This interconnectedness is the human environment, a phrase intended to point toward the deep interconnection between the immediacy of our own lives, including the question of "How much is enough?," and both the social and natural worlds around us. This collection brings together essays from an international conference jointly sponsored by Ryukoku University, Kyoto, and the Institute of Buddhist Studies, Berkeley. The effects of our own decisions and actions on the human environment is examined from several different perspectives, all informed by Buddhist thought. The contributors are all simultaneously Buddhist scholars, practitioners, and activists - thus the collection is not simply a conversation between these differing perspectives, but rather demonstrates the integral unity of theory and practice for Buddhism.
Comments: (4)
Low_Skill_But_Happy_Deagle
This book is fine and gives a valuable knowledge about Buddhist's view of consumerism.
Ndyardin
It is one of those few life changing books. A must read for all those who are simply fed up with our consumerist way of life. Finished the entire book in one read.
Xellerlu
The basic idea of the book is great, but the writing is not. It is a selection of essays and almost all of them are from people in academia. It is sad but true that most academic writing is not very good.

We read this book in our Zen book discussion group and talked as much about the style as the content. We discovered an interesting article on line that explains the problem with academic writing. Do a google and read this:

Dancing with professors: the trouble with academic prose. P. N. Limerick. NY Times Book Review

If you can deal with the tortured prose of academia there are some interesting ideas. There are several essays about the environmental work of Zen temples in Japan. There are interesting questions raised about the nature of environmentalism as we normally think of it, and what really matters for human happiness.
Dagdardana
I felt bad that this book earned only three stars based on one review. This anthology is, in fact, well written--excellent collection of intellectually challenging and spiritually motivating essays. It is also very useful for those who are not familiar with Buddhism. Essays analyze the political economic structures that feed human desires and greed and thus, create only suffering not only for humans but also for other living creatures. The heart of Buddhism is to end suffering. The various essays challenge the readers to rigorously analyze social structures through the Buddhist lens of Four Noble Truths and three poisons (i.e. ignorance, greed) and to contemplate how to practice Buddhism in American society dominated by callous capitalism. I especially appreciate that this book does not portray Buddhism as a feel-good religion or individualized spirituality.