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eBook How to Love the Job You Hate download

by Jane Boucher

eBook How to Love the Job You Hate download ISBN: 0840778198
Author: Jane Boucher
Publisher: Thomas Nelson Inc (February 1, 1994)
Language: English
Pages: 247
ePub: 1743 kb
Fb2: 1736 kb
Rating: 4.5
Other formats: doc rtf mbr lrf
Category: Work and Money
Subcategory: Business Culture

The title of this book (How to Love the Job You Hate) is somewhat of a misnomer as the .

The title of this book (How to Love the Job You Hate) is somewhat of a misnomer as the book covers many aspects of the working world, both from the employee's side and the employer's side, including job duties, personality conflicts with bosses and co-workers, self-esteem, generation gaps, employee safety, performance evaluations, and work-life balance

Executive coach Jane Boucher gives tips and strategies on how to cope with irritating bosses and co-workers, fall back in love with your job and improve at-work self-esteem. Also a section on how employers can motivate workers.

Executive coach Jane Boucher gives tips and strategies on how to cope with irritating bosses and co-workers, fall back in love with your job and improve at-work self-esteem. Online Stores ▾. Audible Barnes & Noble Walmart eBooks Apple Books Google Play Abebooks Book Depository Alibris Indigo Better World Books IndieBound.

Jane Boucher, CSP, owns Boucher Consultants, a nationally recognized business consultancy specializing in maximizing personnel resources. The title of this book (How to Love the Job You Hate) is somewhat of a misnomer as the book covers many aspects of the working world, both from the employee's side and the employer's side, including job duties, personality conflicts with bosses and co-workers, self-esteem, generation gaps, employee safety, performance evaluations, and work-life balance.

Corporate Training Programs. How To Love The Job You Hate. Are you among the two-thirds of today’s work force who do not like their job? It may not be your fault, but only you can change it.   About the Workshop. As corporate America has placed more and more emphasis on technology and market statistics, it has often ignored its greatest asset: people. You probably work for more than money. You want to feel appreciated and fulfilled. You want to feel a sense of purpose. This seminar helps you clarify your purpose, change your attitude, and learn to like your job again

Thanks for that, that second chance But let me tell you something you'd understand Go fuck yourself Don't tell me that you are who you are You are who you are It's only been a minute since you knocked me Now you're try to treat me like you love me But I'm not fooled by it. Cause you are who you are You are who you are. Said you'd never go away You've got these troubles day after day It, It all sounds the same I'm not listening to a word you say. You're forever takin' aim You've got these troubles day after.

Can’t Stand Your Job? Scared of Your Boss? .

Can’t Stand Your Job? Scared of Your Boss? Suspect Your Co-Workers Are Talking About You Behind Your Back? You’re not alone! Half of all American workers experience. Boucher, a business consultant, professional speaker, and founder of Boucher Consultants-a nationally recognized firm specializing in effectiveness, professional growth, and s practical advice on how to increase job satisfaction by taking charge of a bad situation with positive new attitudes and behaviors.

Even people who are relatively happy at work go through periods when they hate their jobs-for days, weeks or even months at a. .This is a guest post by Nisa Chitakasem, co-author of the book, How to Get the Job You Want. She blogs at Career Blog.

Even people who are relatively happy at work go through periods when they hate their jobs-for days, weeks or even months at a time. Here are 10 things you can do to make things better. Her other articles for FORBES include, "How To Work A Room Like You Own The Place. Even people who are relatively happy at work go through periods when they hate their jobs-for days, weeks or even months at a time. Just read between the lines of the recent obituaries of CBS newsman Mike Wallace, who died on April 7 at the age of 93.

You?re not alone! Half of all American workers experience job dissatisfaction. Internationally respected author and executive coach Jane Boucher can help with her book: How to Love the Job You Hate: Job Satisfaction for the 21st Century. Boucher shows workers how to cope with keeping their jobs in this difficult economy. How to Love the Job You Hate: Job Satisfaction for the 21st Century will change your attitude from TGIF to TGIM (Thank God It?s Monday). Похожие книги: 21st-Century Cellists (Backstage Books). This collection of interviews sparkles with the indivi. т 1752.

Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by station39. cebu on November 19, 2019. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata).

Jane Boucher received her bachelor of science and master of arts degrees from The Ohio State University. McGregor Organizational Institute. She has done doctoral work at the University of South Florida and has been an adjunct professor at the University of Dayton, Wright State University, Sinclair Community College, and Antioch University McGregor. She also served as Associate Director of the Antioch University McGregor Organizational Institute. The author of seven books, including best seller How to Love the Job You Hate, she uses both the podium and the pen to promote personal and professional excellence.

Boucher, a business consultant, professional speaker, and founder of Boucher Consultants--a nationally recognized firm specializing in effectiveness, professional growth, and communications--offers practical advice on how to increase job satisfaction by taking charge of a bad situation with positive new attitudes and behaviors.
Comments: (4)
Very Old Chap
Not a good read. Did not help me to love my job. I guess I had high expectations, but the book did not provide any magic secret to loving your hated job.
Zehaffy
For a variety of reasons, everyone seems to hate their job these days. This book shows how to discover just what the problem may be, and how to fall back in love with your job.

What sort of personality do you have? Are you a detail-person, interested in analysis and interpretation of information, who finds yourself in a people-person job? Are you a support-person, best suited for a backroom job, in a command-person position? Delegate the things you don't like to do. Build a good relationship with your boss and co-workers. Try learning something new. Understand the temperament of your boss. Listen to, and communicate with, your co-workers. Take a hard look at yourself; consider the image you present to your co-workers.

Stress is a part of daily life; learn how to reduce it, both physically and emotionally. Perhaps Mr. or Ms. Rotten Co-Worker is experiencing personal problems that are negatively affecting their ability to do their job. Also consider the sort of company that you work for. Someone who is more accustomed to a buttoned-down, structured environment might have a hard time at an internet start-up, and vice versa. There is a right way, and wrong way, to leave your job, if you have decided that quitting is your only option. The author also looks at criticism; how to give it, and receive it, along with the dreaded performance review. There is a separate section in this book just for bosses. It looks at subjects like personality clashes with employees, dealing with their needs, and how to keep them motivated.

This is an excellent and eye-opening book. It is easy to read, and can certainly reduce rampant job dissatisfaction in America. Before you quit because you "hate" your job, read this book.
Friert
The title of this book (How to Love the Job You Hate) is somewhat of a misnomer as the book covers many aspects of the working world, both from the employee's side and the employer's side, including job duties, personality conflicts with bosses and co-workers, self-esteem, generation gaps, employee safety, performance evaluations, and work-life balance.
With such a range of topics, the material on each tends to be necessarily light and rather general. For that reason, as a human resource director, I would not recommend it for HR professionals with more than five years of experience or for the senior manager unless intended as a refreshing reminder of what we can all forget too easily.
With that said, I would recommend the excellent section on performance evaluations for even the senior professional. Performance evaluations are widely misunderstood and very seldom done well. I found myself underlining several tips Boucher put forth, such as, "Think of your managers as detectives, charged with discovering how your employees can be more productive" (now that's a useful performance evaluation!) and "Allow [your managers] to buy-in to the accomplishments of the employee." (Small and mid-sized employers, take heed; nothing motivates like money, and management of staff-too often viewed as a chore-is no exception!)

I would strongly recommend this book for all newer HR professionals as well as for low- and mid-level supervisors. It is especially essential for the first-time supervisor. Some of Boucher's insights are simple common sense (though it never hurts to be reminded of the basics), but many are excellent and occasionally very creative. Boucher's suggestions to employees disillusioned with their jobs to do something different (reorganize the order in which tasks are done, take an aerobics class during lunch or otherwise get out of the office), trade unwanted tasks with a co-worker, avoid complainers who can bring one further down, and get involved in your company's community service activities are all sound, though some of her suggestions (rewrite your job description, take on special projects) may not be available to all readers, depending on their situations. The section on personality types is an excellent reminder that differences are not always bad-and that there will be people in every workplace different than you. (If not, you'll have a very one-sided, and likely less successful, company!) I do wish Boucher would have included a more extensive questionnaire for personality type in an appendix, perhaps, rather than the short and generalized chart provided, as I found it be less accurate than true personality tests.
The book also includes occasional well-placed examples where readers can see a piece of advice used in a real-life situation. The results in these vignettes are not always perfect (and I do appreciate the realism, very much), but the situation often does improve. (However, I should note that I did not appreciate the example on page 79, which praised a person who offered a highly unethical idea that subsequently doubled the sales of his employer.)
Self-talk is also mentioned in the book. I can't emphasize how important that can be, not only on the job but in life in general. Boucher says, "If you make a mistake... be as understanding with yourself as you would be with another person who made an honest mistake. ...You would never say, `I can't imagine how you could be so stupid as to have made that mistake' or `Only a complete idiot would do that.'" Boucher also reminds us, "Our society tells us we must be perfect, fast, strong and always say yes." While we would like to always be so, the fact is that we necessarily have limitations, and it does no good (in fact, it does harm) to berate ourselves for it.
There are two sides to every coin. Employers should take note, not only of the performance evaluation section, but the section on employees' needs. Boucher rightly observes, "There is a fine line between pressing for better productivity and expecting your employees to work long hours for little pay just to slice a thin line of profit." Yes, business is business, but one should never forget what that business is made of-people. Also, the goal-setting section in chapter 16 will be helpful for employers and employees alike.

As Boucher reminds us on the first page, "What happens at work affects every other area of our lives." Find out how to make it better.
Levion
This book helps you understand the elements of your unhappiness, and find ways to change the situation for the better. It is filled, from cover to cover, with sensible, practical ways to make change one of the biggest parts of your life: your career.
This book would have helped most of the unhappy workers I have known. There is also a section for employers that might prevent many people from needing help, if its suggestions are applied. If you are ready to fix the problems that are making you less happy than you could be, or if you know someone who might be ready to take charge of their happiness at work, then this is a good book to begin with.