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by Charles Baden-Fuller,John Stopford

eBook Rejuvenating the Mature Business: The Competitive Challenge download ISBN: 0875844766
Author: Charles Baden-Fuller,John Stopford
Publisher: Harvard Business Review Press; Revised Edition edition (April 1, 1994)
Language: English
Pages: 250
ePub: 1778 kb
Fb2: 1805 kb
Rating: 4.4
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Category: Work and Money
Subcategory: Biography and History

Charles Baden-Fuller and John Stopford explain how a mature business can rejuvenate and how it can transform not only itself, but also its industry - even going so far as to rewrite the rules for success.

Charles Baden-Fuller and John Stopford explain how a mature business can rejuvenate and how it can transform not only itself, but also its industry - even going so far as to rewrite the rules for success. Baden-Fuller and Stopford challenge managers to jettison the traditional thinking that pervades their industry, and to replace it with new, entrepreneurial ideas ranging from distributor relationships to new product design to market scope.

Full Stop, John Stopford and Charles Baden-Fuller's "Rejuvenating the Mature Business" is one of the best and most insightful books on business/marketing strategy that I've ever had the chance to come across and read

Full Stop, John Stopford and Charles Baden-Fuller's "Rejuvenating the Mature Business" is one of the best and most insightful books on business/marketing strategy that I've ever had the chance to come across and read. And, it serves me almost continuously in my daily working life as a Strategic Consultant.

Charles Baden-Fuller, a strategy scholar is the Centenary Professor of Strategy and leader of the Strategy Group at the Cass Business School. Baden-Fuller is also a fellow of the Strategic Management Society. and is Senior Fellow at the Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania.

Rejuvenating the mature business: The competitive challenge. C Baden-Fuller, JM Stopford. Business models: A challenging agenda. C Baden-Fuller, V Mangematin. Strategic Organization 11 (4), 418-427, 2013. Mastering strategic renewal: Mobilising renewal journeys in multi-unit firms. HW Volberda, C Baden-Fuller, FAJ Van Den Bosch.

Charles Baden-Fuller, Martyn Pitt. Rejuvinating Mature Business: The Competitive Challenge. It is possible to turnaround and sustain success in mature markets

Charles Baden-Fuller, Martyn Pitt. John Stopford, Charles Baden-Fuller. It is possible to turnaround and sustain success in mature markets. The key theme is that firms, and in the end managers, are the key engine of success not the industry in which one competes. As the authors note, the average profitability of an industry is not the same as the individual firm.

Charles Baden-Fuller and John Stopford explain how a mature business can rejuvenate and how it can . This is an ex-library book and may have the usual library/used-book markings inside. This book has hardback covers. In good all round condition.

Rejuvenating the Mature Business: The Competitive Challenge (Hardback). Charles Baden-Fuller (author). Illustrated by many examples drawn from a wide range of international businesses, this book challenges conventional theories of strategic management and shows how immense progress has been achieved, even with limited resources, by creating entrepreneurial organizations that capture and gain leverage from experimentation, imagination, and skill enhancement at all levels.

Baden-Fuller and Stopford challenge managers to jettison the traditional thinking that pervades their industry, and to replace it with new, entrepreneurial ideas ranging from distributor relationships to new product design to market scope.

by Charles Baden-Fuller, John Stopford. ISBN 9780415135207 (978-0-415-13520-7) Softcover, Cengage Learning Emea, 1996.

Article in Long Range Planning 45(s 2–3):93–104 · April 2012 with 57 Reads. Whenever a business enterprise is established, it either explicitly or implicitly employs a particular business model that describes the design or architecture of the value creation, delivery, and capture mechanisms it employs.

In business, as in life, those people who succeed are focused, energetic, creative, persistent - and brave. They not only confront the changes taking place in their environment, but also take charge of change to lead their industries. To help managers of mature businesses take control of their destinies, Rejuvenating the Mature Business outlines a four-step procedure for rejuvenation. Charles Baden-Fuller and John Stopford explain how a mature business can rejuvenate and how it can transform not only itself, but also its industry - even going so far as to rewrite the rules for success.Baden-Fuller and Stopford challenge managers to jettison the traditional thinking that pervades their industry, and to replace it with new, entrepreneurial ideas ranging from distributor relationships to new product design to market scope. They profile such companies as Hotpoint, which broke traditional rules by focusing on a national market when its rivals were international; Benetton, whose innovative strategic supplier alliances have made it a low-capital, high-profit operation; Banc One, whose service innovations revolutionized U.S. consumer banking; and knife manufacturer Richardson Sheffield, whose pioneering quality control, "lean" production strategies, and new product innovations led it from near bankruptcy to world leadership. The stories of these companies and many others, from Toyota to British Airways, dramatize each phase of rejuvenation.How can managers be rejuvenators? The authors emphasize what they call a crescendo approach - starting with experiments using few resources, then working up to larger investments. They clearly lay out the practical steps, demonstrating how managers must first galvanize, creating a top team dedicated to renewal and willing to take new initiatives. They then describe the process of simplification, focusing scarce resources on a few carefully selected goals. Their third step is building new capabilities through strategic innovation. And fourth, they outline the methods for maintaining momentum. Along the way, managers learn why rejuvenators have low staff turnover and high morale; how they can assess and cope with risk; why effective change is like mounting a "strategic staircase"; how value can be delivered - without tradeoffs - to staff, customers, and shareholders alike; how conventional opposites - like high quality and low costs - can go hand in hand; and how economic downturns, fast-changing technology, and fluctuating consumer behavior can be translated into golden opportunities.This book is the rejuvenators' manual, replacing outdated conventional wisdom with powerful new thinking and strategies for success. Reading it should be every manager's first step toward giving their own firms new life.
Comments: (2)
Quemal
Although this book has some age on it in this fast moving business world, it is as useful and applicable today as it was when originally published. I think it demonstrates that certain insights, analysis, and advice from 25 years ago still applies today even when it seems that the business world is undergoing transformation and disruption such that anything but the very latest thinking is irrelevant.
Samowar
This is an exciting and well written book. It argues persuasively that maturity is not cast in stone - it is a state of mind. It is possible to turnaround and sustain success in mature markets. The key theme is that firms, and in the end managers, are the key engine of success not the industry in which one competes.
As the authors note, the average profitability of an industry is not the same as the individual firm. An industry may perform badly because on average firms are failing to add real value to the customer. In this environment the innovative firm can sweep aside the competition and be highly profitable. The authors show the reader how this is possible!
The authors draw their argument from rich case examples both from the USA and Europe. Their industry foci are diverse, encompassing the services and manufacturing sectors, and firms who compete in both consumer and industrial markets. Examples of sectors drawn upon in this book include Retail Banking (Banc One), Mass Fashion (Benetton), Kitchen Knives (Richardson Sheffield), Fibres (Courtelle), Industrial Pumps (Edwards) and Domestic Appliances (Hotpoint).
From these cases the authors argue that the key to competitive success is innovation in both business processes and products or services. The most powerful contribution of this book is to offer guidance on how senior management can shape a rejuvenation programme. The Crescendo Model of Rejuvenation is the centre piece of the book. The model advises that the process of rejuvenation moves from galvanising the top team, simplify the tasks that the business addresses, build organisational capabilities and leverage to maintain momentum. Interestingly, important in this process is small scale experimentation, rather than grandiose 'bet the company' projects. Practical cases and advise guide the reader through the process.
The book is excellent both in terms of content and writing style. I strongly recommend it both to practising managers and students of management.