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eBook The Purple Land: Being The Narrative Of One Richard Lamb's Adventures In The Banda Oriental, In South America, As Told By Himself (1904) download

by William Henry Hudson

eBook The Purple Land: Being The Narrative Of One Richard Lamb's Adventures In The Banda Oriental, In South America, As Told By Himself (1904) download ISBN: 1436589533
Author: William Henry Hudson
Publisher: Kessinger Publishing, LLC (June 2, 2008)
Language: English
Pages: 364
ePub: 1254 kb
Fb2: 1748 kb
Rating: 4.8
Other formats: azw mobi docx rtf
Category: Traveling
Subcategory: South America

Hudson, W. H. (William Henry), 1841-1922.

Hudson, W. Uruguay - Description and travel.

The Banda Oriental, in South America, as Told By Himself. This work was first issued in 1885, by Messrs. Illustrated By Keith Henderson. Sampson Low, in two slim volumes, with the longer, and to most persons, enigmatical title of The Purple Land That England Lost. A purple land may be found in almost any region of the globe, and 'tis of our gains, not our losses, we keep count. We are often told that an author never wholly loses his affection for a first book, and the feeling has been likened (more than once) to that of a parent towards a first-born.

By W. (William Henry) Hudson. Being the Narrative of One Richard Lamb's Adventures in The Banda Oriental, in South America, as Told By Himself.

blurb - Published in 1885, The Purple Land was the first novel of William Henry Hudson, author of Green Mansions

blurb - Published in 1885, The Purple Land was the first novel of William Henry Hudson, author of Green Mansions. The Anglo-Argentine naturalist distinguished himself both as one of the finest craftsmen of prose in English literature and as a thinker on ecological matters far ahead of his time. In Davies' hands this 'road novel' becomes a fast paced romp in the tradition of Tom Jones, with a dash of Don Qu. Saturday Play - Andrew Davies' rip-roaring treatment of WH Hudson's South American classic.

Format: Book, EBook; LOC call number: PR6015. Hudson ; illustrated by Keith Henderson.

The Purple Land: Being the Narrative of One Richard Lamb's .

The Purple Land: Being the Narrative of One Richard Lamb's Adventures in the. The Purple Land: Being the Narrative of One Richard Lambs Adventures in the. William Henry Hudson was born in Buenos Aires, Argentina on August 4, 1841 to American parents. He developed a heart condition as a teenager and finally moved to England in 1870. He also published numerous books on ornithology and the English countryside including Argentine Ornithology, British Birds, Afoot in England, A Shepherd's Life, Dead Man's Plack, A Traveller in Little Things, and A Hind in Richmond Park. He died on August 18, 1922.

The purple land Of the first of these three a word only need be written

Being the Narrative of One Richard Lamb's Adventures in The BandaOriental, in South America, as Told By Himself. ILLUSTRATED BY. Keith Henderson. Of the first of these three a word only need be written. This was theperiod of courtship and matrimony; and though the experience seemedto me then something altogether new and strange in the world, it mustnevertheless have resembled that of other men, since all men marry. Andthe last period, which was the longest of the three, occupying fullythree years, could not be told.

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This scarce antiquarian book is a facsimile reprint of the original. Due to its age, it may contain imperfections such as marks, notations, marginalia and flawed pages. Because we believe this work is culturally important, we have made it available as part of our commitment for protecting, preserving, and promoting the world's literature in affordable, high quality, modern editions that are true to the original work.
Comments: (7)
Xar
I first read this book when I was in my late 20s or early 30s (I'm late 60s now). Since I'm enjoying my retirement so much and I love reading, I decided to go back and read books that were/are especially meaningful to me. One of these books is "Green Mansions: A Romance of the Tropical Forest." I would recommend this book to anyone who has even one romantic bone is his/her body. I hope you read it, and if you like it now and you're in your sort-of early years, remember to reread it when you're older and have some time on your hands. You'll love the book again!
Sharpbinder
“Green Mansions: A Romance of the Tropical Forest” was a little slow to start, but once I made it past the first few chapters, I really saw the beauty of this book as the author described the tropical forest of Venezuela. Readers need to realize this book came out in 1904 and some of the attitudes would be offensive by today’s standards as the author touts the superiority of the white man compared to the native “savages”. If you can put aside any angst this might cause, I think you’ll enjoy the interesting descriptions of the people as well as the romance that Abel, the main character and narrator, has for his “green mansions” as he calls the tropical forest and later a young girl he meets named Rima.

Like with other Victorian novels that feature a romantic story line, I did find myself questioning Abel’s intense love and devotion for Rima. The author did spend a lot of time describing her physical beauty, but I wondered what exactly would keep the two of them together given their vastly different experiences and cultures. It seemed to be more of a love-at-first-sight kind of thing for Abel, although Rima does have an amazing gift in her affinity with the forest and creatures.

In addition to the pages dedicated to describing the “green mansions”, the book also provides some opportunity for deeper reflection as we see Abel struggle with the decisions he made, conflicts between warring tribes, love, hope, and endurance. These elements spiced things up making for a more satisfying story and ending. Overall, I enjoyed the book, and I’m glad I stumbled across this free read!
Dordred
This is an adventure story, a love story, a drama, and a tragedy all rolled up in one good read. I read this when I was a young girl and its haunting story I could not forget...just the details which I probably understand now that I am much older. The author paints word pictures so well that you can visualize yourself in the forest, or savannah along with the characters. It says a lot about human nature as is is today and makes you want for a better world. A world where all people get along with each other and the living things in the environment. If you haven't read this yet...I recommend that you do sometime. Don't expect a "happily ever after" ending as you will be sadly disappointed if you are.
JoJoshura
This is a facsimile of a 1931 reprint of the 1926 Duckworth edition, illustrated by Keith Henderson. It was promised two years ago, but publication was delayed, possibly because Margaret Atwood's introduction (new to this edition) wasn't ready. Though less informative than Ian Duncan's introduction to the Oxford World's Classics edition of twenty years ago (now, sadly, out of print), it may help to sell the book to 21st-century readers. The real attraction for those who have already read it, however, is the black-and-white Art Deco illustrations and solid cloth binding, making the book a physical pleasure to read. As a facsimile, of course, it reproduces the errors of the 1926/1931 text, the most confusing of which occurs on p. 89, where the eighth and ninth lines have been transposed. For some reason also the name "Oalava" was changed to "Oolava" in this version, and the inscription on the urn reads "Sin vos y siu dios y mi" (p. 307); it should read "Sin vos y sin dios y mi." Indeed, in her introduction, Atwood locates the main action of the story in "Guyana," whereas Hudson more properly uses "Guayana" throughout to designate the vast eastern and southern region of Venezuela. But these are quibbles.
Querlaca
Here I am, 82, and just now reading this classic. Perhaps I wouldn't have had the patience in busier years. For some patience is needed as this work is wordy. But those words are beautiful, and if you are not moved by this love story, be worried.
invasion
It took me a while to adjust to the archaic writing style, but the story was as I remembered it. Beautiful prose and a lovely story, but alas, no HEA.

I downloaded the free version and found nothing wrong with it other than a few typos. If you decide to give it a try, note that "at ear" should be "a tear" and "gorges" should be "gorgeous." Also "fruitless" should be "fruitlets" and "irides" should be "irises."
Zugar
I read this book when I was a child and could barely remember the story line. Of course, reading it as an adult added layers of meaning. What stood out most to me were the contrasts between beauty and savagery found in both the landscape an the people. Abel experiences states if existence that reach ecstatic heights of spiritual awareness and love of God and his creations counterbalanced by excruciating depths of base depravity.
The story leaves me touched and haunted.
A gripping mystical story of love amidst wild lands and savages.
Timeless and deeply touching, did not want to put it down.
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