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eBook Army Fatigues: Joining Israel's Army of International Volunteers download

by Mark Werner

eBook Army Fatigues: Joining Israel's Army of International Volunteers download ISBN: 1934440086
Author: Mark Werner
Publisher: Devora Publishing (January 8, 2008)
Language: English
Pages: 279
ePub: 1284 kb
Fb2: 1757 kb
Rating: 4.4
Other formats: docx txt mobi doc
Category: Traveling
Subcategory: Middle East

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Army Fatigues: Joining Israel's Army of International Volunteers,Mark Werner.

Jews, American Israel Biography Americans Volunteer workers in social service Voluntarism. On this site it is impossible to download the book, read the book online or get the contents of a book. The administration of the site is not responsible for the content of the site. The data of catalog based on open source database. All rights are reserved by their owners. Download book Army fatigues : joining Israel's Army of International Volunteers, Mark Werner.

Army Fatigues: Joining Israel’s Army of International Volunteers. He has just returned from his 17th volunteer stint on an IDF base. In a Bomb Shelter in Southern Israel. What it’s like to be awakened by a 'Code Red' siren alerting you to the incoming Palestinian missile.

The armed forces of many nations have, at one time or another, used foreign volunteers who are motivated by political, ideological or other considerations to join a foreign army. These may be formed into units of a given nationality or may be formed. These may be formed into units of a given nationality or may be formed into mixed nationality foreign units. Sometimes foreign volunteers were or are incorporated into ordinary units

An American lawyer, Mark Werner volunteers each summer to work on Israeli military bases. He is the author of Army Fatigues: Joining Israel’s Army of International Volunteers (2008)

An American lawyer, Mark Werner volunteers each summer to work on Israeli military bases. This is a story of one of his volunteer experiences, where he had welcome company. Some fathers and sons spend time together fishing or attending sporting events. He is the author of Army Fatigues: Joining Israel’s Army of International Volunteers (2008).

The Army is part of the DOD and is the largest of the five military branches. It handles major ground combat missions, especially operations that are ongoing. The Army Special Forces unit is known as the Green Berets for its headgear. Service members are known as soldiers. The reserve components are Army Reserve and Army National Guard. The Coast Guard is part of the Department of Homeland Security (DHS). It’s responsible for maritime law enforcement, including drug smuggling.

Army fatigues provide a Strength bonus of 1 as well as an Agility bonus of 1. They do not take any armor slots, thus can be worn in addition to a full set of armor.

The Volunteer Army was a White Army active in South Russia during the Russian Civil War from 1917 to 1920. The Volunteer Army fought against Bolshevik forces in the Southern Front and the Ukrainian War of Independence

The Volunteer Army was a White Army active in South Russia during the Russian Civil War from 1917 to 1920. The Volunteer Army fought against Bolshevik forces in the Southern Front and the Ukrainian War of Independence. In 1919 it was made part of the Armed Forces of South Russia, becoming the largest force of the White movement until it was merged with the Army of Wrangel in March 1920.

Why do thousands of people from around the world volunteer to work on Israeli Military bases in the Sar-el "Volunteers for Israel program"? The author focuses on the everyday lives of Israeli soldiers and civilians, offering an insider's view of Israel's armed forces.
Comments: (7)
Thetalen
Our daughter just got back from her first Sar-El trip in July 2009, with the International Youth Group Program of Sar-El. She had travelled to Israel the year before with us on a tour of the Holy Land, and we were fortunate to be able to let her go this past summer.

The descriptions in the book of the groups' work and the interaction with the young soldiers are very reminiscient of our daughter's description of her 3-week tour. She was able to spend one weekend with her Sar-El friends in Tel Aviv, and was blessed to be invited by the family of one of the IDF soldiers to spend Shabbat weekend.

This is a must-read book for all of those persons who are considering making a trip to Israel for Sar-El, or even if you just want to know how people are helping Israeli's protect their right to live in their historical (and present day) homeland.
Bloodray
I was initially skeptical. Having lived in Israel for over thirty years I had the sense that a book about volunteers often in the age of pension who come to volunteer for stints of a few weeks , could not be something very serious. I was wrong. Mark Werner in telling of four stints of volunteering he did at Army bases, and in one case at a naval base revealed to me yet another surprising and encouraging chapter in the saga of contemporary Israel.
Werner begins by tracing his family background focusing on his father, who fought as a partisan against the Nazis. Werner tells of his unusual childhood growing up in an agricultural community in New Jersey most of the members of which were Jewish Holocaust survivors. He speaks of the Zionist education he received, and this certainly is central to the decision he made as a lawyer working in Raleigh , Virginia to volunteer for pro bono work in Israel.
The progam he is a part of is called Sar- El. It involves people from all over the world coming to work at Army bases, doing repair and maintenance work which frees up soldiers for other duties. Werner says in the concluding section of the book that a major reason for 'volunteering' is to show the people of Israel that they are not alone, not abandoned, even when the world's media is distorting their story, turning moral reality upside down, and making them the 'villains' of the Middle East conflict. Werner also gives other reasons for the volunteering including the widening of his own personal world, the meeting many new acquaintances. There is too the realization of a long- time dream of giving something to Israel.
The book itself is a delight to read. Werner's descriptions of the many different volunteers he meets , of the young Israeli soldiers who are often his guides are clear and interesting. The book is a kind of journal and includes also a picture of what is going on in the overall life of Israel at the time. It illustrates extraordinarily well the constant security challenges Israel faces.
Werner himself appears as a very good and conscienscious volunteer, a hard and proud worker. He also in the course of his volunteering uses time - off to meet relatives he has in Israel, and tells their stories. Werner is an optimist, but at the same time a strong realist. If he sees sordid realities he frankly depicts them, and makes no effort at whitewashing them.
Werner's strong and positive character shines through this work.
His writing of this book is as I understand it a continuation of his volunteering and contributing to Israel.
Those of us who have lived in Israel for many years owe Werner and dedicated volunteers like him our gratitude.
Prinna
The writing made you feel that you were actually there, particpating with the writer in volunteer efforts so critical to the Israeli Army. With a preliminary understanding of the author's connection to the Holocaust (father was a survivor and freedom fighter) and an overview of what is actually happening today, you'll come away feeling more deeply involved in Israel's survival and the strength of its people. I hope there are more books to come from this talented writer.
Doomblade
We are given a view of Israel from the inside, and at ground level. The book isn't dramatic in content, but it can be in impact - if you are interested in this inside view. I particularly enjoyed it when Mark describes or discusses some place in Israel where I have been, or mentions the impact of some event (unfortunately, often bad) which I remember from the news. I feel much better informed about life in Israel, about the impact of events on the population, and on many of the controversies affecting the people and the country. Well, I also was quite interested in the material about how the armed forces operate, again from the inside. The time Mark spent off-base with friends and relatives further added to this inside view. So I've very pleased I've read this book, and I'm rating it based on its doing for me what it's intended to do.
TheMoonix
Of the author's four trips only the first one gets the "royal treatment" with a fascinating, in-depth look at the base, his work, the soldiers, and fellow volunteers. His other three trips are described in much more cursory detail. Worst of all are the descriptions of his weekends that I basically skimmed without feeling like I'd missed much. Also, there are a lot of typos in the transliterated Hebrew words. Overall recommended, but the material would have been better served as a series of articles rather than a full-length book.
Andriodtargeted
Mark Werner spent 11 weeks in 4 stints as a Sar-El volunteer in Israel. I felt that I should spend a few minutes to highly recommend you read his book, which chronicles his experiences in an engrossing and entertaining way. He intersperses historical facts and background, glimpses into the everyday life of Israelis, and physical descriptions of the land and its attractions, with the realities of living in a volatile region of the world. I came away with such a strong admiration for the volunteers, who are of varied nationalities and religions, and a deeper understanding of the complexities facing those charged, both militarily and politically, with sustaining the nation.
Delaath
Overall, a fascinating, insightful and entertaining read. In Army Fatigues, Mark Werner recounts his experiences with the Volunteers for Israel program. This journal highlights Mr. Werner's personal interactions with the young Israeli soldiers, older officers, and other international volunteers as he performs basic support services and maintenance needs for the Israel Defense Force. Mr. Werner's experiences offer a unique perspective within the historical, social, cultural, and political climate of the times; a perspective that is not found anywhere else.