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by Eric Hazan,David Fernbach

eBook The Invention of Paris: A History in Footsteps download ISBN: 1844677052
Author: Eric Hazan,David Fernbach
Publisher: Verso; Reprint edition (June 6, 2011)
Language: English
Pages: 408
ePub: 1273 kb
Fb2: 1673 kb
Rating: 4.8
Other formats: txt rtf azw lrf
Category: Traveling
Subcategory: Europe

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by Eric Hazan (Author), David Fernbach (Translator). I like the idea of this book very much. Moving backwards through history, Hazan also traces the roots of revolt through several generations of Parisian society, touching upon such figures as Tocqueville and Raspail along the way. Finally, it's the city's most loveable fop, Baudelaire himself, through who's eyes readers see the flop-houses, carousels, graveyards, and the Seine, a not always beautiful sight that nonetheless few will be able to resist. Taking us around and around the circle of a city as it grew and kept bursting beyond the walls used to keep people in and out, at the same time.

The Invention of Paris: A History in Footsteps (Hardback). In "The Invention of Paris", radical author and publisher Eric Hazan takes the reader on an exciting and historically rich tour through the construction of Paris, exploring the places and struggles that have marked its growth. Eric Hazan (author), David Fernbach (translator). Hardback Published: 01/03/2010.

Hazan reveals a city whose squares echo with the riots, rebellions and revolutions of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Combining the raconteur’s ear for a story with a historian’s command of the facts, he introduces an incomparable cast of characters: the literati, the philosophers and the artists-Balzac, Baudelaire, Blanqui, Flaubert, Hugo, Maney, and Proust, of course; but also Doisneau, Nerval and Rousseau

The Invention of Paris book. The Invention of Paris: A History in Footsteps.

The Invention of Paris book. Start by marking The Invention of Paris: A History in Footsteps as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. by. Eric Hazan, David Fernbach (Translator).

A History in Footsteps. by Eric Hazan Translated by David Fernbach. Hazan reveals a city whose squares echo with the riots, rebellions and revolutions of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Combining the raconteur’s ear for a story with a historian’s command of the facts, he introduces an incomparable cast of characters: the literati, the philosophers and the artists-Balzac, Baudelaire, Blanqui, Flaubert, Hugo, Maney, and Proust, of course; but also Doisneau, Nerval and Rousseau.

Near the end of The Invention of Paris, Eric Hazan extends Jules Michelet’s observation that every historical era .

Near the end of The Invention of Paris, Eric Hazan extends Jules Michelet’s observation that every historical era dreams its successor: it is even more clear that each epoch lives in nostalgia for its predecessor, above all in a period when this sentiment, promoted like a washing-powder, fits marvelously into an ideological scaffolding, the strategy of ends-of history, of the book, of art, of utopias (p. 360).

The Invention of Paris: A History in Footsteps. Eric Hazan, translated by David Fernbach

The Invention of Paris: A History in Footsteps. Eric Hazan, translated by David Fernbach.

Eric Hazan, David Fernbach (trans. London; New York: Verso Books. a b Biography for: Paul Durand-Ruel Archived 2007-11-06 at the Wayback Machine. Between March 1–15, 1897 they exhibited works by Adolfo Müller-Ury the exhibition being preceded by one by Renoir and followed by one of Pissarro. Stamberg, Susan (18 August 2015).

Author Eric Hazan provides an exciting and historically rich tour through the construction of Paris, exploring the places and events that have charted its growth. He concentrates on the literary and cultural history, as well as the riots, rebellions and revolutions.

The Invention of Paris is a tour through the streets and history of the French capital under the guidance of radical Parisian author and publisher Eric Hazan. Hazan reveals a city whose squares echo with the riots, rebellions and revolutions of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Combining the raconteur’s ear for a story with a historian’s command of the facts, he introduces an incomparable cast of characters: the literati, the philosophers and the artists—Balzac, Baudelaire, Blanqui, Flaubert, Hugo, Maney, and Proust, of course; but also Doisneau, Nerval and Rousseau. It is a Paris dyed a deep red in its convictions. It is haunted and vitalized by the history of the barricades, which Hazan retells in rich detail. The Invention of Paris opens a window on the forgotten byways of the capital’s vibrant and bloody past, revealing the city in striking new colors.
Comments: (7)
Risteacor
This book has some good overview of the city of Paris, its physical body, the author goes district by district of Central Paris, describing its streets, stories and history. This gives you a better notion of the city's urban space. The thing missing is a map, a good one, since reading the first part of the book means following the descriptive, but not boring, speech of the author. Without a map reading this book would be like reading words without meaning (unless if you already knows the city very well, of course). The final chapters are about the Commune and representations of Paris made by artists. But I found the first part of the book the real fun in reading it. I'm reading now "Parisians" which is another good book about Paris. I also recommend "Walks through lost Paris", a beautiful small illustrated book about parts of city that no longer exist.
RuTGamer
From page one, you enter a romance-free zone. Not for the casual Parisian enthusiast. A detailed map of Paris will help as a guide for this well researched encyclopedic adventure. "The Invention of Paris", reaches delightful levels as the pages come to conclusion. An excellent reference tool to branch off from, carefully referenced. If you're looking to peel back the Parisian centuries, and begin to feel and understand the intrigue of this wonderful, crazy, creative, city, this may be a piece of the puzzle.
Garne
One may complain that it's hard to follow without a map -- a good map is essential and historical maps of the changing dity might be especially helpful -- or of too much detail, which is sometimes too much of a good thing... but most readers would miss those highly clarifying historical asides.
Chapeau!
Nagor
I like the idea of this book very much. Taking us around and around the circle of a city as it grew and kept bursting beyond the walls used to keep people in and out, at the same time. I especially like reading about Flaneurs and photography in Paris. But what happened to the maps. As others have pointed out, they are impossible to read even under spotlights. Too bad in an otherwise sparkling book.
Redfury
Wonderful and full of information.
zzzachibis
Hard to read. written as if the reader knows a lot of background already. Much fascinating material but not that accessible.
Cia
This book is a very interesting study of the history (and the story) of Paris, how its arrondissements were formed and the famous people who have walked its streets over the centuries. It first dwells on the old Paris and its "quartiers" (Palais-Royal, Tuileries, Bourse, Marais, the Latin Quarter, Saint-Germain, etc), then on the new Paris and its "faubourgs" (Saint-Honoré, Saint-Antoine, Montparnasse, etc) and its "villages" (Passy and Auteuil, Vaugirard and Grenelle, Montmartre, La Villette, etc), then describes the "red Paris", i.e. the story of the various revolutions that stirred the city over the course of the XIXth and the XXth centuries up to 1968 ("the story of Red Paris illustrates better than any other Walter Benjamin's remark according to which the time of the oppressed is by nature a discontinued one. During the 1830 fights, tallying and astounded testimonies tell of insurgents firing upon monument clocks"). The book ends with various portraits of famous Paris strollers, such as Baudelaire or Balzac, with many quotations drawn from their works.

On the whole, a vivid and very instructive book,full of anecdotes, which bases itself not only on topographical or historical knowledge, but also on the classics of literature (Balzac, Benjamin, Rousseau, Baudelaire...).
Since I will be going to Paris (again) in a few weeks, I decided to have some fun in advance and buy a few books to prepare. I bought and read Graham Robbs' "Parisians", and found it well written, but also artificial, and about Paris in a very limited way. I hesitated, and finally decided not to read Hazans "The invention of Paris", which I had also bought, but instead take it with me to Paris. Yet, just to be sure it was worth the trouble, I started leafing a bit - well, okay, started reading, just a few pages, you know the sort of thing - to see if it was any good, and indeed, couldn't stop and finished it right away. I had never heard of Hazan, which meant that the book was in some ways quite a surprise.

To begin with I was amazed to discover that the book was translated from the French. Since I also read French, I would have preferred the French edition, and I will be leaving my English copy at home, and buy the French one in Paris. And although I haven't seen the original yet, I am certain about one thing in advance: the translator, David Fernbach, has done a magnificent job. He obviously took as much loving trouble translating as the writer did writing.
I liked the first part of the book very much, which consists of 225 pages, and was somewhat surprised by the second and third part (150 pages). In the first, Hazan describes in four large chapters in a detailed way how Paris has grown in concentric circles (like an onion, he says), outgrowing a number of walls that have been built round the city in the succeeding ages, and doing so by following in a more or less chronological way the quarters and sometimes the "arrondissements" of which the city consists, culminating in Haussmann's project, although he regularly winds up in the twentieth century. In doing so he consistently points out the traces of all those changes which can still be seen. The French title is more or less: "there aren't any lost steps." It is, by the way, indeed silly of me never to have understood why, going from Bd. Beaumarchais to Rue Amelot, you descend some steps. As witnesses he uses an enormous amount of contemporaries, mainly writers and historians whom he quotes continuously, but without damaging the readability. Hazan is obviously very well read. Being Dutch myself, he is also, I tend to think, a very French intellectual. Perhaps the French have more reason for being radical than the Dutch. His ideas about the city are evidently linked to some very leftist political views. He admires the insurgents on the barricades, speaks lovingly of the eastern and northern city-quarters, always the most revolutionary, and deplores the activities of Haussmann, to whom he ascribes political motives to control the rabble, a word the writer would never use, by the way. Hazan doesn't care much for bureaucrats or authorities. In the 2009 foreword to the British edition, he writes: "Among the activists of urban deterioration in these last ten years I would give top marks to the service of Espace Verts (literally: green spaces)." And yet, I forgive him immediately, because he also sounds very human, and very sympathetic. And because, as far as I am concerned, he is right most of the time. Knowing Paris reasonably well, I started with having the Michelin Atlas of Paris at hand, which is organized according to arrondissements, but after a while I also needed a large map of the complete city. The maps in my copy of the book were so dark that they were of absolutely no use. The second part of the book (Red Paris) treats the revolutions Paris knew, especially the ones of 1848-1851, the third part has two chapters, about "flaneurs" and about photography and Paris. If I would have had anything to say about the book, I would have said: don't. Try to integrate as much as you can out of those last chapters in the first part, and skip the rest. Both parts of the book suffer by this strange division. Nonetheless, this is a magnificent book, which to me seems a must for everyone who loves (and knows) Paris.
Okay, just to prove that I did read the book: the Passage des Panoramas doesn't extend across Bd Montparnasse, but across Bd Montmartre of course (an understandable slip of the pen on page 39). The only obvious mistake is on p. 350, where Fernbach translates (the passus is about Manet's painting Olympia): "The tone of the chairs is dirty". Meant here is of course "nude, flesh, or body" (French "la chair"). And although the footnotes are great, I missed a list of literature. And, to my surprise, Hazan doesn't mention Simenon, which I found a pity.

Nonetheless: I will love walking around Paris with this book at hand. And If I would, in doing so, meet messieurs Fernbach or Hazan, I would take my hat off and bow.