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eBook Cento Citta: A Guide to the Hundred Cities Towns of Italy download

by Paul Hofmann

eBook Cento Citta: A Guide to the Hundred Cities  Towns of Italy download ISBN: 0805014659
Author: Paul Hofmann
Publisher: Henry Holt & Co (December 1, 1990)
Language: English
Pages: 388
ePub: 1996 kb
Fb2: 1616 kb
Rating: 4.7
Other formats: doc lrf mbr docx
Category: Traveling
Subcategory: Europe

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This is an older book that covers 100 towns and villages.

He takes us on a series of walking/auto tours of each of six regions. Starting with a city's central square, town hall, or church, he treats us to a delightful blend of historic and literary past and present. Similar to Baedeker's Italy, but with less emphasis on accommodations and more on native appeal. This is an older book that covers 100 towns and villages.

Hofmann, Paul, 1912-2008. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by booksale-cataloger1 on September 27, 2011. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata). Terms of Service (last updated 12/31/2014). A Donald Hutter book.

Describes points of interest in Italy's small cities and towns, discusses the history of each region and includes practical advice concerning transportation, hotels, and restaurants show more. Format Hardback 400 pages.

Describes points of interest in Italy's small cities and towns, discusses the history of each region, and recommends hotels and restaurants.

Select Format: Hardcover. Describes points of interest in Italy's small cities and towns, discusses the history of each region, and recommends hotels and restaurants. ISBN13: 9780805014655. Release Date: January 1991.

a guide to the "hundred cities & towns" of Italy. 1st ed. by Paul Hofmann. Published 1988 by H. Holt in New York. xii, 388 p. : Number of pages.

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A Donald Hutter book. Cities and towns - Italy - Guidebooks. Hofmann, Paul, 1912- author. Cities and towns Italy Guidebooks. Italy - Description and travel. Italy - History, Local.

Cento Citta: A Guide to the 'Hundred Cities and Towns' of Italy, Holt (New York, NY), 1988. Hofmann's two books on the Vatican take an off-the-wall look at the spiritual landmark. That Fine Italian Hand, Holt (New York, NY), 1990. Roma: The Smart Traveler's Guide to the Eternal City, Holt (New York, NY), 1993. SIDELIGHTS: Paul Leopold Hofmann has parlayed his longtime position as New York Times Rome correspondent and bureau chief into several books on Italy's landmarks and culture. O Vatican! A Slightly Wicked View of the Holy See was followed by The Vatican's Women: Female Influence at the Holy See.

Describes points of interest in Italy's small cities and towns, discusses the history of each region, and recommends hotels and restaurants
Comments: (3)
Mysterious Wrench
What a lovely idea to chose the most interesting places away from the obvious large magnets (Milan, Bologna, Florence etc.) And there are rich pickings from this land of plenty when it comes to history, art and architecture. The book is very limited when it comes to illustration (a few black and white photographs solely), but for once I don't miss it at all. The description of the character of each town or village is enough to set your imagination going. A wonderful read and inspiration.
Sagda
This is an older book that covers 100 towns and villages. I loved the variety that you don't get in tha big name books, although, how I wish there were pictures!
Xellerlu
I lived in Naples from 1991 through 1994 in the days prior the the Internet. I LOVED my stay there and daydream about it even today. I was a single 21 year old male and could not get enough of wandering through the country and meeting its people. For me it was a very important part of my life - not only was I in a foreign country, but also finding myself, finally emerging out of the shadow of my parent's home (a good one). All around me were these people whose langauge I learned so slowly who were all motivated by ideas and goals I could not seem to pin down. In the end I discovered their values and goals were much like mine but how they arrived at them through "The Arrangements" was unlike anything I had even known.

I dearly wish I had then some sort of guide (like this book!) and history to teach me a few things about the people all around me. With my Italian friends I enjoyed long conversations but I found they were most interested in learning about me and my country and discussing current events rather than explaining their culture to me and how their history had influenced their society. I was a celebrity often invited to their homes for meals and family gatherings. I was welcomed morning, noon or night.

"That Fine Italian Hand" took my superficial understanding of the Italian culture and added history and context to it, finally in 2004 answering dozens of questions that had remained unanswered for me.

I was a 21 year old Navy Petty Officer (enlisted) thrust into a foreign land without explaination or choice. Around me were many Americans unhappy about their destination, unwilling to explore the culture and experience the Italian land and the people's generosity. There were some of us though who took this stay as an opportunity that most people never get. It changed me and my friends - for the better. I recognize now that the world is not just an American one, but a world full of people divided by politics and language. I learned the language - or enough of it - but a book like this has helped me with the author's perspective understand everything else much better.

I recommend this book to be one of many you should read if you have a facination with Italy and her peoples. You should definitely read it if you plan to visit Italy. Go there with an open mind. Please don't be the ugly American that I saw in 1993 exiting a very clean and well equipped Pompeii bathroom loudly cussing a refusal to tip the cleaning lady who sat just inside the door. He made us all look bad. Her sign asked for 500 lire - less than 50 cents - for her cleaning services...

I encourage everyone to get out and travel with an open mind, be a good American visitor, study first to arrive with a bit of education to understand and respect your destination, to vote for your government, and if you are a young person without direction or resources to start your adult life, join the military for 4-6 years. You'll come out an adult, with money for college, and some golden experiences.