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eBook Miles Away: A Walk Across France download

by Miles Morland

eBook Miles Away: A Walk Across France download ISBN: 0679425276
Author: Miles Morland
Publisher: Random House (August 24, 1993)
Language: English
Pages: 238
ePub: 1733 kb
Fb2: 1399 kb
Rating: 4.9
Other formats: lrf mbr mobi rtf
Category: Traveling
Subcategory: Europe

humorous and effervescent memoir of reflection, revitalization and. Miles Morland and his wife undertake this 350 mile walk although never before having walked more than a stroll around a park. I believe I read this memoir a while back. I also believe I liked "Miles Away: A Walk Across France" by Miles Morland better the first go-round.

The 350-mile walk also becomes something of a welding together with Guislaine: The couple had divorced . This charming book tells the true story of a hike across France

The 350-mile walk also becomes something of a welding together with Guislaine: The couple had divorced after 13 years of marriage (and had endured three years of misery before the divorce became final), then remarried. After the walking trip, the pair wrote a book about the trip, but it was a dud; Miles took another shot at it and wrote this. This charming book tells the true story of a hike across France. Miles Morland and his French wife make this trip both to commemorate his retirement at age 45 and to try to mend their strained marriage. The author quits his high-pressure financial market job in London and takes a month long walk across France with his wife.

Miles Away A Walk Across France By Miles Morland Illustrated. At this point, who cares if somebody walks across France? And a skinny part of France at that?

Miles Away A Walk Across France By Miles Morland Illustrated.

At the age of forty-five, Miles Morland resigned from his highly paid job (spent largely "shouting down a phone") as head of the London office of a leading Wall Street firm, and took a walk across France with his wife, Guislaine.

Miles Morland, former head of First Boston's London office, did just that when, to the surprise of his superiors in. .

Miles Morland, former head of First Boston's London office, did just that when, to the surprise of his superiors in New York, he abruptly quit in 1989. There are plenty of the usual hikers' adventures: inedible food, attacks by dogs and even a swan, lamentably inaccurate maps, and run-ins with surly hotel personnel.

About A Walk Across France. humorous and effervescent memoir of reflection, revitalization and good wine

About A Walk Across France. humorous and effervescent memoir of reflection, revitalization and good wine. San Francisco Chronicle At age forty-five, Miles Morland left his high-paying job at the London office of a Wall Street firm and took a leap - actually, a hike - into the unknown.

At the age of 45 Miles Morland resigned from his highly paid job as head of the UK division of a major American bank and went for a walk with his wife in France. Neither of them was used to walking further than the distance between a restaurant and a waiting taxi

At the age of 45 Miles Morland resigned from his highly paid job as head of the UK division of a major American bank and went for a walk with his wife in France. Neither of them was used to walking further than the distance between a restaurant and a waiting taxi.

Find across the miles from a vast selection of Books. Across the Miles by Jill E. Buck (English) Paperback Book Free Shipping!

Find across the miles from a vast selection of Books.

"[A] humorous and effervescent memoir of reflection, revitalization and good wine." -- San Francisco ChronicleAt age forty-five, Miles Morland left his high-paying job at the London office of a Wall Street firm and took a leap -- actually, a hike -- into the unknown. A self-described "middle-aged wreck," Miles set out with his wife, Guislaine, to walk across France, from the Mediterranean to the Atlantic.Setting for themselves the goal of twenty miles a day, Miles and Guislaine made their way past farmyards and riverbanks, through dusty village squares and ripening vineyards, into ancient walled cities and over sand dunes. And as the hot, dry countryside unfolded slowly before them, the couple looked back with relief -- and wonder -- at the tense, frenzied corporate life they had left behind.The story of a walk, a marriage, an adventure, and a dream made real, A WALK ACROSS FRANCE marks the debut of an enormously entertaining writer.From the Trade Paperback edition.
Comments: (7)
Musical Aura Island
It is curious reading the reviews here. Plenty of 5 stars claiming it to be uplifting and inspiring. It hardly seems to be the same book as read by the low-rating reviewers. I am afraid I am with most of the 2 and 3 star reviews. As some warn potential readers, the book is not very much (or enough) like what one imagines a trek across the Pyrenees would be. It is part change-of-life for the author (retiring from a life of London investment banking) and part saving-the-marriage. It is not at all clear if the walk succeeded in the latter as the author admits that the final book is a rewrite of an earlier version co-written with the long-suffering Guislaine.

Part of the reason for too much complaining is a serious lack of planning or research--and, as others here point out, the right attitude to visiting a foreign country. Right at the beginning this irritated me because if it was intended to be amusingly British bumbling then it didn't work with me. This was a serious walk, in the mountains, in summer (a serious summer not a British "summer"). They know they are unfit, not-young, city-folk, yet they make no real attempt to get fit, or fitter. With completely predictable results, which they then complain about.

Here I should admit some advance bias--I read the book to see if walking the Pyrenees in summer was as uncomfortable as I had imagined. At least it confirmed that: dry, dusty, sun-exposed to the point of danger; not at all the glorious verdant countryside one usually thinks of in France. I love South & South-West France but the Pyrenees are a daunting thing. Curiously at the beginning of the trip they do a short walk on the Canal du Midi from Carcassonne to Castelnaudary, and he hates it:

"The canal was easy walking but we never warmed to it. It had a dead quality. The water was dark green and still, under a high arch of plane trees so thick that the sun hardly penetrated. ..It was pretty enough in its way but the dominant impression wa one of melancholy. Taking a barge holiday must be disappointing."

I suppose it just proves "chacun ses gouts" but that is heaven for me and walking (perhaps combined with barging and cycing) the UNESCO-listed 17th century Canal from Mediterranean to the Atlantic (Sete to Bordeaux) is on my bucket list. And unlike the rather impoverished dusty villages of the haute Pyrenees, the canal passes through, or close to, an amazing roll-call of wonderful towns and cities. (To be fair Morland does say Narbonne--on a branch of the canal--is delightful.) (Just to be clear the canal is not the Pyrenees; and in fact the usual stepping off point for the East to West walk would begin in Perpignan.)

The reason I read this book was also that there seem to be surprisingly few books on this reasonably well known walking territory. (Dozens of books beginning in the western Pyrenees on the Camino de Compostella, which is also too sun-burnt for my likes). I certainly learned that there is no way I want to do this walk in summer; but the problem is that end-of-summer/autumn is riskier with weather changes and probably more challenging (life threatening at times!). I am probably just too wimpy for the full-on Pyrenees! And actually the walk described is only in the foothills of the Pyrenees so the haute Pyrenees would be even worse.

Incidentally, Morland doesn't seem to like "melancholy" but I believe it infuses this part of the world. As an ancient borderlands (alternating between France and Spain and Basque), and very tough region to eke out a living, and quite recent dark history too, it is an important part of its attraction. It is a very different kind of book but Rosemary Bailey's Love and War in the Pyrenees: A Story of Courage, Fear and Hope, 1939 - 1944 is excellent. In addition to describing Bailey and (famous author husband) Barry Miles' renovation of a ancient house up in the mountains of Pyrenees Orientale (in sight of Canigou) but the most interesting is the description of the paths used to escape the Nazis in WW2 and the role of the (southern) resistance, the Maquis. It convinced me that I could try some short walks in that part of the world--there are marked trails from France over the Pyrenees into Spain, close to the coast. And that it is probably a better bet to rent a gite in this forest-y part of the Pyrenees and do some less ambitious local walking.
Ustamya
If you are looking for a travel-log of things to see and do as you walk across France, then this book is not for you. The content of this book is really a fragment of Miles Morland's biography. It can be considered a daily diary describing the progress of Morland and his wife (Guislaine) as they walk across southern France from the Mediterranean to the French coast. Dispersed among the descriptions of countryside, farm animals (especially dogs and one amusing encounter with a very large bull), hotels and cafes are vignettes of the Morland's troubled marriage, and Morland's career "Shouting Down The Phone" in the financial districts of London and New York. The walk is the Morland's first venture after Miles has "retired" from "Shouting Down The Phone". (I am repeating the phrase just to mimic one aspect of the book.) Undertaking such a walk deserves considerable praise, especially as neither of them had any prior claim to physical fitness. The walk was made less difficult by carrying light packs and walking relatively small distances each day. Extensive planning helped them identify towns and villages with suitably comfortable beds and restaurants which might provide shelter and food at night. Even so they do not find things as idyllic as many readers might expect from the title. The faults of many of the accommodations and cafes they visit are noted in some detail, although without malice - I suspect that the Morland's expectations were higher than is the reality of village France. It's worth noting that although Miles did not miss his old job during and immediately after the walk (he planned on becoming a writer), he does appear to have gone back to it in recent times. Whether his marriage survived remains unanswered!
Darkraven
This charming book tells the true story of a hike across France. Miles Morland and his French wife make this trip both to commemorate his retirement at age 45 and to try to mend their strained marriage. The author quits his high-pressure financial market job in London and takes a month long walk across France with his wife. They allow a month for the five hundred kilometer trip and set a grueling 20 to 30 kilometer per day pace for themselves. The author is strangely frugal for someone of his background. They stay in second-rate hotels in unfashionable parts of towns. They take meals in out of the way restaurants and are sullenly served by the haughty locals. His wife buys a pair of hiking boots to replace the uncomfortable blister-causing pair she brought from home, which they mail back to England. They take with them only the things that will fit into rucksacks they carry on their backs. This trip was a unique quest, more an ordeal than an adventure. Dogs, heavy traffic, and blistered sore feet torment them. I feel that they enjoyed themselves less than one has a right to expect on a month long vacation. An engaging read about a trip that I wouldn't want to try to duplicate myself.
watching to future
I enjoyed the bemused, self-deprecating tone of the narrator in this story. He is a typical Englishman and he knows it, and he plays this as a strength in giving us his impression of life, the Walk he and his half-French wife take across France, and his mid-life crisis. As I read the book, I felt like I was making a friend.
The descriptions of the countryside and the sights were a little sparse, and I found it hard to imagine what it all looked like. Also, the snippets of history provided were a little jarring and disconnected, and not terribly interesting. But the thing that makes this book a winner and redeems it is the gentle and wide-eyed optimism of its protagonists, the Morlands, as well as their indomitable spirit in facing the hardships of walking hundreds of miles.
I was hoping to learn a little more about France, but still thought this book was a nice read for while I was commuting on the subway to work. Sometimes my journey felt like it was paralleling the Morlands'.
I recommend this book if you like travelogues and are interested in France.