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eBook A Pattern of Islands download

by Arthur Grimble

eBook A Pattern of Islands download ISBN: 1906011451
Author: Arthur Grimble
Publisher: Eland Books (September 8, 2011)
Language: English
Pages: 272
ePub: 1381 kb
Fb2: 1809 kb
Rating: 4.7
Other formats: lrf rtf mbr rtf
Category: Traveling
Subcategory: Australia and South Pacific

Sir Arthur Francis Grimble, KCMG (Hong Kong, 11 June 1888 – London, 13 December 1956) was a British civil servant and writer. Grimble was educated at Chigwell School and Magdalene College, Cambridge.

Sir Arthur Francis Grimble, KCMG (Hong Kong, 11 June 1888 – London, 13 December 1956) was a British civil servant and writer. He then went to France and Germany for postgraduate studies. After joining the Colonial Office in 1914 he became a cadet administrative officer in the Gilbert and Ellice Islands, of which he became Resident Commissioner in 1926

A Pattern Of Islands book. Arthur Grimble clearly cherished his years spent as a colonial official in the Gilbert and Ellis Islands.

A Pattern Of Islands book. He started his tenure as a young man with a new wife in 1914 and remained in the islands until 1933, although this book only relates his tale up to 1919.

Various tales from the Gilbert and Ellice Islands are recalled by Arthur Grimble commencing with his cadetship at the end of 1913. In a witty, honest, self-depreciating style this book makes light insightful reading. nobody could be always right, except an Englishman. The Almighty was beyond doubt Anglo Saxon".

Arthur Grimble was sent to the Gilbert and Ellice islands as a colonial administrator in the twilight of the . A Pattern of Islands is a rich and complex cultural history of the dances and legends, rituals, spells and way of life of the islands. It is also a riproaring adventure story.

A Pattern of Islands is a rich and complex cultural history of the dances and legends, rituals, spells and way of life of the islands. Grimble learns to spear hungry sharks, to negotiate fearsome reefs and, on one terrifying day, is used as human bait to catch a giant squid. To read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate.

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A Pattern of Islands Grimble.

The book retains its magic in 2011 when colonialism is anathema. Gimble, as modest as he is perceptive, fell utterly in love with the islanders, learning Gilbertese, even allowing himself to be used as bait for catching giant octopus: "A dreadful sliminess with a Herculean power

The book retains its magic in 2011 when colonialism is anathema. Gimble, as modest as he is perceptive, fell utterly in love with the islanders, learning Gilbertese, even allowing himself to be used as bait for catching giant octopus: "A dreadful sliminess with a Herculean power. Download the new Indpendent Premium app. Sharing the full story, not just the headlines. Download now. Though he was forced home by illness, the book ends with him drawn back. Bestsellers (books) Magic Molluscs Transport.

A British drama film Pacific Destiny based on the book was made in 1956. The book was republished by Eland in 2010.

Stranger and funnier than fiction-the true story of an Englishman in the Pacific Islands'.

A Pattern of Islands" is the funny, charming and self-deprecating . Please provide me with your latest book news, views and details of Waterstones’ special offers.

A Pattern of Islands" is the funny, charming and self-deprecating adventure story of a young man in the Pacific. Living for thirty years in the Gilbert and Ellis Islands, Grimble was ultimately initiated but not before he was severely tested, as when he was used as human bait for a giant octopus. Grimble collected stories from the last generation who could remember the full glory of the old pagan ways. This is anthropology with its hair down.

The funny, charming, and self-deprecating adventure story of a young man in the Pacific. Living for thirty years in the Gilbert & Ellis Islands, Grimble was ultimately initiated and tattooed according to local tradition, but not before he was severely tested, as when he was used as human bait for a giant octopus. Beyond the hilarious and frightening adventure stories, A Pattern of Islands is also a true testament to the life of these Pacific islanders. Grimble collected stories from the last generation who could remember the full glory of the old pagan ways. This is anthropology with its hair down.
Comments: (7)
Querlaca
A Pattern of Islands by Arthur Grimble

Various tales from the Gilbert and Ellice Islands are recalled by Arthur Grimble commencing with his cadetship at the end of 1913. In a witty, honest, self-depreciating style this book makes light insightful reading ... "nobody could be always right, except an Englishman ... The Almighty was beyond doubt Anglo Saxon".

In London, his job interview commenced with "Let us see ... yes ... let us go on a voyage of discovery together ... Where precisely are the Gilbert and Ellice islands? If you will believe me, I have often been curious to know". The interview continued with a discussion about insisting "upon the dominion of romance, not the romance of dominion" and was ultimately successful in part because he was the only candidate to ask for the job.

Originally published in 1952, the book was luckily part of my English literature course in 1959 - an enlightened relief from the standard Charles Dickens fare. Its impression remained to 2011 as I remembered his anecdotes such as seeing the slitting of the belly of an attacking shark "rip itself open like a zip-fastener, discharging blood and guts"; the catching of a giant octopus allowing himself to be used as bait; and his cure of a French missionary by faith and lies. (Having administered the last morphine tablets with a rusty hypodermic syringe he injected pure water subsequently.) My impression resulted from the insight Grimble relates as he faced novel situations alone, and his thoughts while overcoming his feeling of lack of preparation. Plus the honest effort Grimble put into learning the local language and becoming an expert on the islands.

There is a kaleidoscope of topics covering geography, culture, traditions, phosphate mining, copra production, religion, administration - always entertaining never encyclopedic. Grimble gives the case for "Pax Britannica" but combining existing beliefs with Christianity - "A tree without roots dies, but new grafts thrive on a trunk that stands deep-rooted in the soil of its homeland".

The return of the book is to be welcomed, as is the information about these islands, now the two island nations of Kiribati and Tuvalu since independence in 1979 and 1978. Times have changed of course. Kiribati is expected to be the first country in which all land territory disappears due to global warming and, in the book, when a native pastor "... ordained that a wave should arise to the height of the Government's flagstaff and sweep away the Flag" it was not identified with a tsunami.

Malcolm Cameron
29 August 2011
TheMoonix
In late 1913, the young and newly-married Arthur Grimble was nominated as a cadet administrator for the Colonial Office, at a time when the British Empire still wrapped itself, and English values, around the world. Grimble was posted to the distant Gilbert Islands in the Western Pacific Ocean, to a place where a thin veneer of British ways barely papered over the native culture of the islanders.

Such is the premise of "A Pattern of Islands", Grimble's delightful memoir of his first overseas tour. As the representative of a distant government in London, Grimble found himself thrust into the middle of a complex and very different society of fishermen, with well-defined traditions for civility, intermural warfare, poetry and even sorcery. Fortunately for the reader, Grimble was an observant and skilled writer. With typical British understatement, respect, and humor, he captures a fascinating portrait of the people he came to administer. The result is a unique cultural history from the turn of the last century.

Grimble was willing to try anything, from experimenting with explosives in Government House to acting as bait for the trapping of a rather large octopus to rescuing a mentally unbalanced man from an unhappy crowd. "A Pattern of Islands" is highly recommended as an excellent read.
Wooden Purple Romeo
I would give it five stars if the authors original drawings were in this edition. The writing is excellent. The self-deprecating stories of his own folly and ignorance of local customs are hilarious. Other experiences related to local people's and customs are poignant, respectful and illuminating. It is a shame that so much has been lost by the ignorant interferences of the "enlightened" modern world. These people suffered huge losses during the war in the pacific. This book is set in the decade or so prior to the onset of WWll.
Brick my own
This is an amazing early ethnographic account of life in the South Pacific Gilbert Islands. Starts out like a comedy of all the ways a young district commissioner was judged as naïve and inept by his seniors and by the islanders. But moves to a deeper study of island culture. I read this book sixty years ago and remembered it for his experiences with fishing for a giant octopus. this time I found amazing scenes of a shaman like islander calling in the dolphins and how he endured tattooing so as to be admitted as a member of a cla.. His best teacher is a young island girl Moves like clouds. Beautifully written, honest portrayal of colonial administration, and scenes of community gatherings, ways of island navigators, tales from old mythology including creation myths. It was this book that made me want to travel to distant tropical islands and see the world. A book that led me eventually to becoming an antghropologist..
Iell
A fascinating insight in to the Pacific Culture in the early 1900's told from the perspective of a British Government employee. I loved the different stories and learning how this family adjusted to life in the tropics. A brilliant read.
Marr
a unique account of the life and career of a colonial officer in the remote Gilbert & Ellice islands. Grimble had an anthropological interest about the islanders & must have been the epitome of an enlightened colonial administrator, writing of his experiences with humour and humility.
The_NiGGa
This book was written in the 1950s about a period early 1900s. It is a very refreshing read and appealing to readers of all ages. It touches on humorous, spiritual, historical and cultural events and dilemmas with every page touching on something interesting and different. I learned a lot about Kiribati by reading this book.