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by Sherrie A. Inness

eBook Pilaf, Pozole, and Pad Thai: American Women and Ethnic Food download ISBN: 1558492852
Author: Sherrie A. Inness
Publisher: University of Massachusetts Press (April 9, 2001)
Language: English
Pages: 248
ePub: 1332 kb
Fb2: 1798 kb
Rating: 4.1
Other formats: docx rtf mbr doc
Category: Traveling
Subcategory: Asia

Read by Sherrie A. Inness. Sherrie Inness' stuff is essential to understanding what is in your fridge right now and why. I loved the essay on contemporary international cooking as competative cultural status in particular.

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For many Americans, eating ethnic food is so commonplace as to be taken for granted. Sherrie A. Inness is associate professor of English at Miami University of Ohio. Among her publications is The Lesbian Menace: Ideology, Identity, and the Representation of Lesbian Life (University of Massachusetts Press, 1997), which was selected by Choice as an "Outstanding Academic Book of the Year. Библиографические данные. Pilaf, Pozole, and Pad Thai: American Women and Ethnic Food, Стр. 55 Pilaf, Pozole, and Pad Thai: American Women and Ethnic Food, Sherrie A.

Pilaf, Pozole, and Pad Thai - American Women and Ethnic Food is a collection of eleven personal essays and observations that revolve around food, ethnicity, and our changing culture. Sherrie Inness' book is divided into two parts. Part I, entitled Reflections on Family, Food, and Ethnicity, includes personal essays revolving around food and relatives, specifically women. Part II, entitled Changing Relations to Ethnic Food, focuses on the roles ethnic food plays when it crosses boundaries and is consumed by people from different cultural groups

For many Americans, eating ethnic food is so commonplace as to be taken for granted.

p. em. Includes bibliographical references and index. ISBN 1-55849-285-2 (library cloth: alk. paper)- ISBN 1-55849-286-0 (pbk. : alk. paper) 1. Food habits-United States. CHAPTER TEN Let's Cook Thai Recipes for Colonialism Lisa Heldke I think I've finally figured out why I like Thanksgiving dinner so much, why I enjoy having it at my house, cooking all the food myself, and eating it-sometimes for days afterward. It's because I never wonder what to fix. I prepare virtually the same meal every year.

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Pilaf, Pozole, and Pad Thai: American Women and Ethnic Food. Cooking Lessons: The Politics of Gender and Food. Ed. Innes. Woman Hollering Creek. New York: Vintage Books, 1991. Amherst: U of Massachusetts P, 2001. Voices in the Kitchen: Views of Food and the World from Working-Class Mexican and Mexican American Women. College Station: Texas A&M University Press, 2006. Avakian, Arlene Voski. Boulder: Rowman & Littlefield, 2001.

Pilaf, Pozole, and Pad Thai: American Women and Ethnic Food University of Massachusetts Press, 2001 and. Inness, Secret Ingredients, Palgrave Macmillan, 2006, p. 169 In the 8 chapters of Secret Ingredients Inness explores a number of themes.

Discover Book Depository's huge selection of Sherrie A Inness books online. Free delivery worldwide on over 20 million titles. Pilaf, Pozole and Pad Thai. The Food of Paradise: Exploring Hawaii's Culinary Heritage. Results show that over a half of married foreign-born men and women had arrived in the US in different years and that the sequence is gendered, with men more often arriving before the women. These patterns differ by country of origin. In general, the earlier arrival is older, and more likely to be employed than the later arrival, whether the earlier arrival is the husband or the wife.

For many Americans, eating ethnic food is so commonplace as to be taken for granted. Yet, whether we acknowledge it or not, such foods create a powerful social language that speaks of cultural traditions and tastes that have been handed down from one generation to the next and, in some cases, appropriated and commodified by American commercial culture. Ethnic cooking represents both a source of sustenance and a complex form of communication.

In this volume, eleven scholars explore the role of ethnic food in American culture, with a particular focus on women. The first six chapters offer personal accounts of the ways in which ethnic meals are embedded in women's memories and fortify their connections to one another. From a Sicilian-born mother who affirms her allegiance to her heritage through the loving preparation of traditional tomato sauce and pasta, to a Swedish American woman whose dozens of boxes of recipe cards document a process of cultural assimilation, to an Armenian American who uses a shared passion for cooking to forge a relationship with her lover's family -- these essays speak in a personal voice about the power of food as a marker of women's identity. The final five chapters take a more analytic approach, scrutinizing the social and political aspects of ethnic food and the phenomenon of "culinary tourism." One essay offers a brilliant meditation on the gendered discourse of cooking in the Mexican American community, showing how food preparation provides many Chicanas with a vital language of self-expression. Another essay probes the author's penchant for Thai food and other cuisines from economically dominated cultures, situating it in the context of a larger system of privilege and oppression and as a form of cultural colonialism. By going beyond the obvious, these essays challenge our assumptions and expand our understanding of the significance of ethnic food in women's lives.

Contributors include Meredith E. Abarca, Arlene Voski Avakian, Linda Murray Berzok, Benay Blend, Lynn Z. Bloom, Paul Christensen, Cathie English, Doris Friedensohn, Lisa Heldke, Heather Schell, and Leanne Trapedo Sims.