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eBook National Geographic Traveler: Taiwan 2nd Edition download

by Phil Macdonald

eBook National Geographic Traveler: Taiwan 2nd Edition download ISBN: 1426201451
Author: Phil Macdonald
Publisher: National Geographic; 2 edition (November 20, 2007)
Language: English
Pages: 272
ePub: 1846 kb
Fb2: 1870 kb
Rating: 4.6
Other formats: lrf txt mbr azw
Category: Traveling
Subcategory: Asia

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FREE shipping on qualifying offers. The relaunched National Geographic Traveler guidebooks are in tune with the growing trend toward experiential travel. by Phil Macdonald (Author).

The National Geographic traveler. The National Geographic traveler. National Geographic Society. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; china.

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I bought both the National Geographic Traveler and Lonely Planet guides for Taiwan before working there for a. .

I bought both the National Geographic Traveler and Lonely Planet guides for Taiwan before working there for a month. While I was there, I found that National Geographic Traveler was more useful for planning places to go and things to do because it uses in depth highlights of tourist spots to visit and has full color photos and drawings throughout. However, I found that the Lonely Planet guide had more information, both useful and not. It had descriptions, hours of operations, and costs for many destinations that both tourists and residents would frequent.

He worked for the Hong Kong Standard and South China Morning Post for a number of years before settling-by way of Laos and Singapore-in Phuket, Thailand. Close X. Learn about new offers and get more deals by joining our newsletter.

Series By Phil MacDonald. Books By Phil MacDonald. National Geographic Traveler: Hong Kong, 2d Ed. Series By Phil MacDonald. National Geographic Traveler.

Overview: National Geographic Traveler is the world's most widely read travel magazine. With captivating storytelling and beautiful you-are-there photography, National Geographic Traveler brings you the world’s best destinations

Overview: National Geographic Traveler is the world's most widely read travel magazine. With captivating storytelling and beautiful you-are-there photography, National Geographic Traveler brings you the world’s best destinations. 2019-12-01 National Geographic Traveler Interactive.

Each guide begins with an introduction that enables the traveler to sample a bit of the culture, history, and attractions before they go and plan the trip based on their own interests and length of stay.

Visitor arrivals in Taiwan grew by an impressive 14.5% in 2005, reaching 3.4 million travelers and continuing to rise. With surveys showing that readers specifically trust National Geographic to provide expert advice on exotic destinations, we've fully updated our popular guide to the tiny island nation. An island of diverse attractions, Taiwan charms visitors with its little-known surprises: misty peaks famous for sunrises and high-mountain tea, the world's finest Chinese art museum, coral reefs that thrive in tropical waters, and some of the best Chinese cuisine in the world. Arranged in regional chapters, this comprehensive guide covers Taiwan in fascinating detail—from Taipei, where traditional night markets and Taoist temples contrast a 21st-century skyline (the world's tallest building is here)... to stunning Taroko Gorge, a marble canyon etched with hiking trails... to gorgeous beaches lapped by turquoise waters... and aboard the alpine railway to the top of 10,000-foot Alishan, a mystical realm above the clouds offering fabulous scenery and sublime relaxation. National Geographic Traveler: Taiwan (2nd Edition) includes full-spread, mapped driving and walking tours; three-dimensional illustrations; and an extensive visitor information section describing how to get around, what to see and do, and where to stay and eat—with an insider's handpicked list of exceptional hotels and restaurants in all price ranges. Veteran travel author and longtime Southeast Asia resident Phil Macdonald brings his authoritative guidance to this in-depth tour, ably acquainting visitors with an alluring, varied, and increasingly popular destination.
Comments: (7)
Rolling Flipper
I found this book to be about the most useful travel book I have ever purchased. I work for a major US airline, was formally a college Geography professor, and have traveled to over 30 countries, so I have used just about every kind of travel guide. I purchased it because I read a review by a person who also swore by Lonely Planet (as I have always done), but ended up using this more on her trip--which was exactly what I ended up doing. I purchased both this one and the Lonely Planet Taiwan, and hardly used the Lonely Planet. This National Geographic guide made my whole trip better, and enabled me to see more than I ever would have using the other guide. I rented a car from Taipei and drove almost the whole country in 3 days--stopping at all of the major interest points along the way with the help of this book. It has driving maps with all of the important things listed along the routes, and best of all has glorious photos of things, so you know what you want to see in the first place. I would suggest anybody going to Taiwan purchase this fantastic book! I would also suggest that anybody driving in Taiwan purchase a Taiwan map before you go. It is hard to get a good map over there. Driving over there is pretty easy, as long as you stay out of the big cities. You can't see the many beautiful national parks on the east coast without a car.
Gralmeena
I bought both the National Geographic Traveler and Lonely Planet guides for Taiwan before working there for a month. While I was there, I found that National Geographic Traveler was more useful for planning places to go and things to do because it uses in depth highlights of tourist spots to visit and has full color photos and drawings throughout. However, I found that the Lonely Planet guide had more information, both useful and not. It had descriptions, hours of operations, and costs for many destinations that both tourists and residents would frequent. It could be described as an insider's guide of what to do in Taiwan, but the quantity of information was more than the quality. Lonely Planet's few color plates were okay, but not as helpful as those found in the National Geographic Traveler. This made the Lonely Planet harder to decide what to do from the many options provided because the choice was usually only based on a couple of sentences. The maps were better in Lonely Planet, but I ended up using a tourist map when I was in Taipei.

I recommend getting both. I found that I would see interesting photos in National Geographic Traveler and then look up the information in Lonely Planet to decide if it was worth doing or not.
Thetahuginn
I purchased this book based on reviewers' comments. I'm delighted with the book and will use it, in conjunction with Passport Taiwan, to map out our itinerary. I would certainly recommend both books -- and a map of Taiwan -- to anyone considering a trip to that country.
Androlhala
Beyond some nice photography, there's not a whole lot of substance to this guide book. Descriptions are brief and not entirely comprehensive. One positive was the introductory pages that explained the history and culture.
Trex
I brought both the Lonely Plant and National Geographic Guide to Taiwan. The Lonely Planet book was great, because the names of places were given in both English and Chinese characters. The Chinese characters are a must for taxi drivers. There are not a lot a pictures, so the National Geographic Guide came in real handy as well. If you are only buying one, the lonely planet guide is esssential.
Gavigamand
Honestly it was OK but it was out of date and things change. The whole culture , habits, how to act thing was off . I suspect it was a reprint of some outdated data . Now if you want to learn a little history or interesting facts or find a few sites to see its fine. My wife is from Taiwan and by now you can say I am since they allow dual citizenship .I stay there in the warmer weather at my wifes house and wonder the island. (you will notice just how clean the streets always are) They are friendly and as far as getting around ....If you can read a map your in buisness ! The street signs are in English and Chinese ! The MRT can get you almost anywhere or to a bus that can take you the rest of the way. If you cant find someone who speaks English just walk a block ...you will find one! Just remember basic manners you learned at home and you will be fine. I have read guides (not this one) that say they are rude to visitors . This is a myth and the person who wrote it was probably the rude one. They simply do not waste time and get straight to the point ! Wow what a time saver ! Not to mention it takes all the guess work out ! I never have to guess what my other half is thinking ...she will tell me ! Very kind and very polite ! As I have found the people there. 2010 it was 1200 NTD to take a Limo from the airport to the city. If you want to save a little just walk out the termial and go a few blocks . It will cost you alot less. The taxis are more expensive usually . Yea, crazy ! Tip for you . Chinese dont tip but the people in your hotel know you do. Keep it lite and you still get good service. I dropped a big tip on my limo driver the first time I went and have not payed for a ride from the airport since ! I still tip him real well though but he does not report the trip Im sure. Hit the tea houses in the mountains for great views and great tea . Eat like a native and you can eat cheap . DONT DRINK THE WATER !!! Its not bad but has a different mineral content that what your use too . Yea ! It does matter ! Or you can be sick for several days for no reason. Use the book as a general guide and its fine just dont expect it to be cast in gold ! Your excange rate last season was about 30 NTD for 1 USD . I find I sometimes get a little better rate in Taiwan . You can exchange your money at the airport . Dont worry its more pleasent than LAX will ever be !Last bit of good advice for you . Hakka food ! Its kinda like southern cooking in the USA but looks different. Plum punch ...Will fix that stomach ache since you did not listen about the water. Take pepto pills newbee ! Be polite you a guest there and they owe you nothing. If your polite it will go a long way with most people there. Dont assume ! There not backwards there and you might learn something . Last take a umbrella . It rains heavy and alot at random. Take it, take it , take it ...your not a duck and you will be the only one without one. Last tip no one will tell you because its not in a book (again manners your mom or dad should have taught you) . Hold you girls umbrella for her even if you get a little wet and you gain major bonus points with the local girls of all ages . Men dont do it there and the woman there love it! You may find a little extra on your plate when they serve you when you go to eat. Thats all the pain I can save you here so good luck and the trip is totally worth it !!! :)