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eBook Wizards of The Game download

by David Lubar

eBook Wizards of The Game download ISBN: 0399237062
Author: David Lubar
Publisher: Philomel Books; 1 edition (April 14, 2003)
Language: English
Pages: 176
ePub: 1910 kb
Fb2: 1659 kb
Rating: 4.7
Other formats: lit lrf docx azw
Category: Teenager
Subcategory: Science Fiction and Fantasy

David Lubar is the author of many popular novels for young readers, including Hidden Talents .

David Lubar is the author of many popular novels for young readers, including Hidden Talents. He has also published many short stories in young adult anthologies. He lives in Pennsylvania. which directly leads to a three page scene where actually scary monsters appear until a surprise character reveals HE can do magic (unlike these kids) because on.

Wizards of the Game book. David Lubar is always funny, but I prefer Sleeping Freshmen Never Lie and Hidden Talents because the stories have a bit more meat to them. Mercer may seem like your average eighth-grader, but every day. But Mercer is a huge fan of a tabletop role playing game that he plays in school and on weekends with a group of his friends. But that's only one plot of this novel. There are a few other things going on.

Wizards of the Game is very suspenseful and full of surprises. I think the book could have lived without it. But David Lubar does have a wonderful book, in which he seems to express not just Mercer's mind, but also his own. Richie's Picks: WIZARDS OF THE GAME

Wizards of the Game is very suspenseful and full of surprises. This exciting book is easy to read (I am in sixth grade) and you can get through it quickly. Even though it's a fast read, it's still really interesting and holds your attention. Richie's Picks: WIZARDS OF THE GAME. Published by Thriftbooks. -Grateful Dead "What was wrong with these people?

David Lubar (born March 16, 1954) is an author of numerous books for teens

David Lubar (born March 16, 1954) is an author of numerous books for teens. He is also an electronic game programmer, who programmed Super Breakout for the Nintendo Game Boy and Frogger for both the SNES and Game Boy. As a game designer, he designed the game Frogger 2: Swampy's Revenge for the Nintendo Game Boy Color. Lubar was born and raised in Morristown, New Jersey. As a boy he frequented the school library where his mother worked, as well as the town library and county library.

Eighth grader Mercer, whose passion is the fantasy role-playing game Wizards of the Warrior World, hopes to use a fund raiser to bring a gaming convention to his middle school.

Eighth grader Mercer, whose passion is the fantasy role-playing game Wizards of the Warrior World, hopes to use a fund raiser to bring a gaming convention to his middle school, but instead he attracts four genuine wizards who are trapped on Earth and want his help in returning to their own world.

Mercer lives for the excitement of the game, until one day when reality becomes even stranger than fantasy

Mercer lives for the excitement of the game, until one day when reality becomes even stranger than fantasy. When a group of religious fanatics protest the game for its simulated use of magic, the press picks up on the story, and Mercer finds himself being stalked by four real-life wizards who are desperate for his help. With his life suddenly in danger, role-playing takes on a whole new meaning for Mercer Dickensen.

Lubar sets up the picketers as straw figures, summarily .

Lubar sets up the picketers as straw figures, summarily dispersed once Mercer articulates t it's an expensive victory, for suddenly cautious school officials also prohibit playing the game on school property. A role-playing game draws the ire of both a church group and a quartet of real wizards in this double-stranded, tongue-in-cheek tale from the author of Dunk (2002).

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Последние твиты от David Lubar (dlubar). Son of a librarian, father of a teacher, proving altruism skips a generation. Designed video games in 1900s. His great musical ability got passed down to every member of the family except me. His descendants include veterans, scholars, scientists, entertainers, and educators. There is much to be proud o. ic.

2003) A novel by David Lubar. Until, that is, a group of students protest the game for its simulated use of magic. The local press picks up on the story, and the next thing he knows, Mercer is being stalked by four real-life wizards who desperately need his help. Mercer Dickenson lives for the battle. Along with his warrior-mage, Shath'dra, Mercer plans to dominate the world of Zule with wealth and power. But first, there is the little problem of Geography class. Suddenly the role-playing has become all too real, and Mercer's own life is at stake. David Lubar has written a funny, tongue-in-cheek fantasy very much in the tradition of Buffy the Vampire Slayer.

Eighth grader Mercer, whose passion is the fantasy role-playing game Wizards of the Warrior World, hopes to use a fund raiser to bring a gaming convention to his middle school, but instead he attracts four genuine wizards who are trapped on Earth and want his help in returning to their own world.Eighth grader Mercer, whose passion is the fantasy role-playing game Wizards of the Warrior World, attracts four genuine wizards who are trapped on Earth and want his help in returning to their own world.
Comments: (7)
Zovaithug
Book was in condition described. Shipped quickly. My 12 year old really enjoyed reading this, was very easy reading for him.
Qwert
I have been thinking on and off about leaving a review for this book. While I loved it, my reasons are much more personal than what I'm normally willing to write about.
To start off with I have never played a game like the one Mercer plays, but I do love to play RPG video games. Because of the gaming aspect and the fantasy I wanted to read it, but the religion part made me procrastinate on this because I was unsure of how religious it really is. It's not that I am against, or dislike religion, I just typically don't like to read about it.
Anyway, before I read this book but after deciding I wanted to read it, I had a bit of an experience similar to Mercer's though instead of being faced with a religious protest I was faced with one person who, for at least half an hour, kept repeating herself and attempting to force me to believe writing about magic in any way is bad, even about something many religions are supposed to promote; i.e. not being prejudiced against people and always getting to know them before making a decision about them, using your natural talents to help people whenever possible (even if the ability is to use magic), and other morals. Just as Mercer experienced, just because it's a world where magic exists, some people are always going to try to destroy it. (By the way, what I wrote here is the very tame version of what she said.)
Like Mercer and the janitor in the book, I agree that magic, especially since it doesn't exist in reality, is fun and a good thing to have around.
I was especially interested, inspired, and perhaps a little encouraged by the way this author used a few moments from the bible to argue both sides, even though I was a bit disappointed that Mercer didn't get the chance to use it in his argument.
The other thing I loved about this book was how much fun the author made the game sound. I never understood the appeal of them before, even while they are RPG games. Now that I know what they are, which are basically RPG adventures with friends, I really wish I had one of these games and friends to play with.
I know in reviews I am also supposed to say what I disliked about the book, but the only thing I can think of is the fact the book ended.
you secret
I read this book because I liked the premise, as stated on the blurb: A bunch of role-playing geeks encounter *real* wizards, and it's awesome.

It sounded great. Doesn't it sound great? And it's technically true - the kids DO play a D&D style game, and they DO encounter real wizards, and real magic DOES happen... at the end of the book, in a kinda one-off moment that makes no real difference whatsoever. The magic part is a needless subplot.

Pity the plot-plot is so... well... um.... Let's put it this way. If everybody was less caricatured, there'd be no book. We have the hysterical "Christians" who are terrified of magic, picket as soon as they get a whiff of anything remotely LIKE magic, drag the Bible into everything they can think of, and who the friendly pastor (who runs a soup kitchen that the game tournament was supposed to help) manages to Bibically condemn as not-really-Christian, though he's far too good to use that term. We've got the Pagan/Wiccan girl (who's probably doing it just as a fad - we're told she wanted to be a nun at one point because her "interests jump around so much) who is determined to beat the picketers at their own game, being as rude and offensive as possible. (Most non-Christians, like most Christians, are far too polite to do this.) We have the hysterical school board that's convinced that even MENTIONING the Bible at a school board meeting is illegal. (It's not.) You have the naive Christian kid who started all this mess *convinced* that he can get in trouble if he prays at school. (He can't - and if he did, he'd be well within his rights to sue. Yes, the ACLU would support him. You're allowed to pray in schools, so long as you're not disrupting class or coercing others.) Also, he's easily converted by people pointing out he has no idea what he's talking about.

And for all that the message of the book is supposed to be "LOL, games are just games, silly!", it's playing this game that gets the kids to try their first act of real magic... which directly leads to a three page scene where actually scary monsters appear until a surprise character reveals HE can do magic (unlike these kids) because on his world magic is used for warfare. (And the real wizards? They're there because they had no way of knowing their partner was an interdimensional thief. This isn't making a good case for "There's no magic, and it's all harmless fun!", is it?) If the people who think that fictional representations of magic are inherently unBiblical and sinful were to read this far (frankly, I doubt that they'd even pick up the book, and those of us who don't think that don't need the whole argument rehashed in this tedious way), I don't think they'd be convinced. Way to undermine your message there....

It's not a very interesting book except in that it's funny now and again to go "OMG! How could he POSSIBLY have oversimplified/wronged THIS aspect of it?"

Oh, and on that note - exactly when does this story take place? Where in the US nowadays can you find people who routinely use modems that tie up the phone line, have no cell phone, and don't find this worthy of comment at all? And this was a plot point! In a book from 2006? It's not like the boy's family is lacking in cash, given how expensive his hobby is and how much his parents are willing to pay for it. What the heck?