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eBook White Crow download

by Marcus Sedgwick

eBook White Crow download ISBN: 1250010292
Author: Marcus Sedgwick
Publisher: Square Fish; Reprint edition (September 18, 2012)
Language: English
Pages: 256
ePub: 1904 kb
Fb2: 1624 kb
Rating: 4.7
Other formats: docx doc doc txt
Category: Teenager
Subcategory: Mysteries and Thrillers

White crow author’s note. Also by Marcus Sedgwick. Blood Red, Snow White. The Book of Dead Days. An orion children’s ebook.

White crow author’s note. The Dark Flight Down. First published in Great Britain in 2010 by Orion Children’s Books. This eBook first published in 2010 by Orion Children’s Books.

Marcus Sedgwick (born 8 April 1968) is a British writer, illustrator and musician. He has published novels such as Floodland (2001; winner of the Branford Boase Award) and The Dark Horse (2002; shortlisted for The Guardian Children's Fiction Prize). He authored several picture books, and has illustrated a collection of myths and a book of folk tales for adults.

What a weird little book is the one I have just read. Markus Sedgwick sure knows how to write books that make me think so much. You must have noticed all crows are black, aren't they?

What a weird little book is the one I have just read. You must have noticed all crows are black, aren't they? Now, imagine what would happen if one day you see not a black crow but a white crow.

And what made it a pretty good book were the themes that it explored and how they connected everything and everybody in the novel.

Posted on November 2, 2010. Title: White crow Author: Marcus Sedgwick. And what made it a pretty good book were the themes that it explored and how they connected everything and everybody in the novel. The ideas of erosion, decay, corruption and destruction permeate the story in all of its levels: in the place where the story is set; in the strained relationship between Rebecca and her father and between Rebecca and her boyfriend ; in the relationship between Ferelith and Rebecca and how it kept moving around circles until it inevitably reached a point of no return; in.

White Crow is a tough book to like. On paper it seems that this would have been an incredible read, whereas in reality, it struggles with pace. As a huge fan of Marcus Sedgwick I couldn't help but feel disappointed in the narratives

White Crow is a tough book to like. As a huge fan of Marcus Sedgwick I couldn't help but feel disappointed in the narratives. It was a book that tried to be something it isn't, and that's a thriller. The three narratives that run alongside each other all differ in style.

September 2012 : USA Paperback.

Blood Red Snow White: A gripping, romantic adventure novel based on the true story of Arthur Ransome's experiences with love and betrayal in war-torn Russia.

Some secrets are better left buried; some secrets are so frightening they might make angels weep and the devil crow. A scary novel by a three-time Printz Award honoree.Thought provoking as well as intensely scary, Marcus Sedgwick's White Crow unfolds in three voices.

Rebecca has come to a small seaside village to spend the summer. Ferelith offers to show Rebecca the secrets of the town . . . but at a price. Finally, there's a priest whose descent into darkness illuminates the girls' frightening story. White Crow is as beautifully written as it is horrifically gripping.

This title has Common Core connections.

Praise for White Crow:“Readers in search of an atmospheric horror/thriller with a high body count and a multilayered mystery--not to mention a good scare--will find plenty to like here.” ―Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books

“Showing his customary skill with a gothic setting and morally troubled characters, Sedgwick keeps readers guessing to the very end.” ―Publishers Weekly, starred review

“This book is one thing very few YA novels are: genuinely scary.” ―Booklist

Novels by Marcus Sedgwick:Saint Death: A propulsive, compelling, and unsparing novel set in the grimly violent world of the human and drug trade on the US-Mexican border.Blood Red Snow White: A gripping, romantic adventure novel based on the true story of Arthur Ransome's experiences with love and betrayal in war-torn Russia.The Ghosts of Heaven: A Printz Honor Book! Timeless, beautiful, and haunting, spirals connect four episodes, from prehistory through the far future.She Is Not Invisible: When her father goes missing, a blind girl talented in identifying patterns and her brother are thrust into a mystery.Midwinterblood: A Printz Medal Winner! Seven stories of passion and love separated by centuries but mysteriously intertwined.White Crow: A scary, thought provoking novel about secrets that are better left buried.Revolver: A Printz Honor Book! A taut frontier survivor story, set at the time of the Alaska gold rush.

Graphic novel by Marcus Sedgwick, art by Thomas Taylor:Scarlett Hart: Monster Hunter: A rip-roaring romp full of hairy horrors, villainous villains, and introducing the world’s toughest monster hunter―Scarlett Hart!

Comments: (7)
Kendis
just finished reading this book, first time I have read this author, I loved this story, it kept me guessing til the very end...will be reading more of Marcus Sedgwick for sure!!! :)
Silverbrew
A good book for people that like Young Adult books that are creepy.
Dianalmeena
I trie3d to read this book but it was awful and I threw it away with the other stupid books I have ordered
Ishnjurus
"The name I have now, and it is this: surprise."

I think this book was really 2.5 stars for me overall but there are a few haunting parts of the book.

I don't normally read scary things because I don't enjoy being scared but that wasn't really a problem with this book. Around page 70 everything was still ambiguous enough I still wasn't sure what the mystery was but I figured there was enough of the book left it would be laid out and the story would pay off in the end. I found I was disappointed. The story continued to feel ambiguous and rushed.

There are some scary implications and some horrifying things happen. But the last fourth of the story feels rushed and confusing. Even important things that lead to these horrifying discoveries get glossed over. But I found the ending unsatisfying and rather abrupt. I kept reading hoping it would pick up but it wasn't my cup of tea.
Dogrel
White Crow is a tough book to like. On paper it seems that this would have been an incredible read, whereas in reality, it struggles with pace. As a huge fan of Marcus Sedgwick I couldn't help but feel disappointed in the narratives. It was a book that tried to be something it isn't, and that's a thriller.

The three narratives that run alongside each other all differ in style. Rebecca, the protagonist is troubled by the forced move to Winterfold; her dad a shamed policeman whose decision caused the death of a young girl. In Winterfold she meets eccentric Ferelith, who is far from your normal teenage girl. As they grow closer to one another, their relationship is tested by Ferelith's constant questions of life.

Rebecca grated on me. I was really hoping that somewhere down the line Ferelith was going to give her a big slap. I found her totally unlikeable, having nothing to relate to her with. Ferelith on the other hand is unique, mysterious and full of character and it is a shame we don't get to discover too much into her past. It seems Sedgwick poses the questions, but never really answers them.

Where the book does succeed is in the eeriness of Winterfold. Especially as we discover (through the third narrative - from the POV of a man of the cloth) that back in the late 1700s, devilish things occurred in Winterfold, as the 'foreign doctor' has built a secret machine that help people discover who will come for them in their passing: an angel? Or the Devil?

I never really understood the change in style. Rebecca's narrative is told in third person present and Ferelith's first person past. I'm afraid to say that this book is very much style of substance, with just an ounce of mystery to it to keep you reading.
Tcaruieb
I found this book in the YA section of my library. As a 23 year old reader, YA fiction can be hit or miss for me, and this book was definitely a miss.
The conflict is that the CONTENT itself is adult content, because it's very philosophical and graphic, but the writing is something I would expect from a book written for middle school or less. Save the confusing diary entries from the priest which are convuluted, "old-fashioned" language and terms, the narration about the girls is simplistic. Too simplistic. And the narration doesn't just change from one person to another, but from first-person to third-person, which is jarring and choppy.
I always feel guilty when making a harsh critique, like it's a disservice to the author whom I know has invested loads of time and energy into his/her work. But I really struggled to make myself finish this book. Instead of getting involved in the suspense and story line, I just kept thinking, "where is this going, and can it get there faster?" I found the book unnecessarily tedious and inconclusive.
Rleyistr
There are very few authors who can make the hair on the back of my neck stand up and cause me to gasp out loud. Marcus Sedgewick is one, and he does it again with White Crow. The pacing is rather slow as the author slips back and forth between present day and 1798, but the slow pacing is offset by the suspense that builds mercilessly as we learn of the Lovecraftian horrors that occurred in the small village of Winterfold in the 1700's. We meet the enigmatic Ferelith who befriends Rebecca and leads her on a present day parallel journey of discovery that ends in its own horrors.

This is a very dark read that takes a hard look at the nature of God and the devil. The dark, gothic atmosphere is intense and the images are sometimes graphic and always riveting. The characters are unique and finely drawn. The short chapters and the author's effective method of drawing readers in make this book a quick and powerful read. The ending was a total surprise and the author's afterword added a somewhat grisly dimension to the story that is likely to generate many late night discussions among readers as he ties his story to real life events. This is a perfect recommend for any fan of literary horror fiction. While marketed as a young adult title, I would say this is most appropriate for older teens and adults. As always, this author seems to be operating on a different level than most of his YA peers. A big recommend.