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eBook Split download

by Joshua Swanson,Swati Avasthi

eBook Split download ISBN: 0307579948
Author: Joshua Swanson,Swati Avasthi
Publisher: Listening Library (Audio); Unabridged edition (March 9, 2010)
Language: English
ePub: 1554 kb
Fb2: 1504 kb
Rating: 4.4
Other formats: mbr azw txt rtf
Category: Teenager
Subcategory: Literature and Fiction

Split Audible Audiobook – Unabridged. Avasthi has woven a remarkable story of physical abuse in a family setting. Not only that, she has perfected the relationship of brothers flung into this terrible reality.

Split Audible Audiobook – Unabridged. Swati Avasthi (Author), Joshua Swanson (Narrator), Listening Library (Publisher) & 0 more. The guilt, the silence, the covering up and the taking on abuse for others. Everything is just so real that it splits you down the middle. It was such an emotional rollercoaster of a read. I couldn't read it fast enough.

Joshua Swanson Official Web Home. Joshua Swanson (born 1978) is an American theater actor, film actor and television actor, voice over talent and a prolific, award-winning narrator of audiobooks with over 100 titles to his name, including This Book Is Not Good for You, all three novels of The Longlight Legacy, Peeps and Hairstyles of the Damned. Superfetch on Animal Planet Narrated by Joshua Swanson.

By Swati Avasthi Read by Joshua Swanson. Swati Avasthi teaches creative writing and is working toward her MFA at the University of Minnesota, where she received a grant to complete Split. By Swati Avasthi Read by Joshua Swanson. Category: Teen & Young Adult Fiction Teen & Young Adult Social Issues. She lives in Minneapolis with her husband and their two children.

Слушайте Split (автор: Swati Avasthi, Joshua Swanson) бесплатно 30 дней в течении пробного периода. Award-winning novelist Swati Avasthi has created a riveting and remarkably nuanced portrait of what happens after. Слушайте аудиокниги без ограничений в веб-браузере или на устройствах iPad, iPhone и Android. After you've said enough, after you've run, after you've made the split-how do you begin to live again? Readers won't be able to put this intense page-turner down.

Split by Swati Avasthi (Unabridged Audiobook). Narrated by Joshua Swanson Award-winning novelist Swati Avasthi has created a riveting and remarkably nuanced portrait of what happens after: After you’ve said enough, after you’ve run, after you’ve made. Narrated by Joshua Swanson. Length: 8 hours and 17 minutes. Award-winning novelist Swati Avasthi has created a riveting and remarkably nuanced portrait of what happens after: After you’ve said enough, after you’ve run, after you’ve made the split - how do you begin to live again? Swati Avasthi. Split, Part 01 of 08.

Joshua Swanson (born 1978) is an American theater actor, film actor and television actor, voice over talent and a prolific, award-winning narrator of audiobooks with over 100 titles to his name.

Joshua Swanson (born 1978) is an American theater actor, film actor and television actor, voice over talent and a prolific, award-winning narrator of audiobooks with over 100 titles to his name, including This Book Is Not Good for You, all three novels of The Longlight Legacy, Peeps and Hairstyles of the Damned

Split by Swati Avasthi is a story about physical, emotional and psychological abuse. It’s the type of book I don’t often Absolutely gripping!! Appalling!! Packs a powerful punch!!

Split by Swati Avasthi is a story about physical, emotional and psychological abuse.

Narrated by Joshua Swanson. A riveting portrait of life after abuse from an award-winning novelist. Sixteen-Year-Old Jace Witherspoon arrives at the doorstep of his estr. After you’ve said enough, after you’ve run, after you’ve made the split-how do you begin to live again? Readers won’t be able to put this intense page-turner down.

Read online books written by Swati Avasthi in our e-reader absolutely for free. Author of Split at ReadAnyBook.

A riveting portrait of life after abuse from an award-winning novelist.Sixteen-Year-Old Jace Witherspoon arrives at the doorstep of his estranged brother Christian with a re-landscaped face (courtesy of his father’s fist), $3.84, and a secret. He tries to move on, going for new friends, a new school, and a new job, but all his changes can’t make him forget what he left behind—his mother, who is still trapped with his dad, and his ex-girlfriend, who is keeping his secret. At least so far. Worst of all, Jace realizes that if he really wants to move forward, he may first have to do what scares him most: He may have to go back. Award-winning novelist Swati Avasthi has created a riveting and remarkably nuanced portrait of what happens after. After you’ve said enough, after you’ve run, after you’ve made the split—how do you begin to live again? Readers won’t be able to put this intense page-turner down.From the Hardcover edition.
Comments: (7)
Lightbinder
Jace is thrown out of the house by his physically and emotionally abusive father, so he rooms with his older brother. It's an awkward pairing since they haven't seen each other in a while. Still a teenager, Jace is thrown into a lifestyle of near-independence. He has to find a job, earn money, and be without the guidance of parents, which isn't the worst thing. His father is crazy and his mother is trapped to the point that she might not be able to see what life could be like without the abuse. Despite the state of his mother, Jace and his brother believe that maybe she'll pull away and join them. This would all have to be done in secrecy and with finesse so that their father wouldn't be tipped off, or he might hurt her even more.

This book was so intense. The father and his threats against them, particularly the mother, is spine-chilling. There's also the emotional drama of seeing Jace figure things out about himself and his family life. I highly recommend this contemporary YA.
Hamrl
"Fightology Lesson #8: Relax when the hits are coming because it hurts less."

This book is nothing short of phenomenal! As we are introduced to our narrator, Jace Witherspoon, he is travelling from Chicago to Albuquerque---in search of shelter and sanity. Jace is one of the strongest characters I have come across in quite a long time. I don't say this because he only makes great choices and he's a natural hero. I say this because he is breathtakingly honest when it comes to his flaws. His brokenness and his vulnerabilities make him a hero to readers.

Jace comes to Albuquergue to find his older brother, who fled their abusive home years before him. But Christian has made a new reality for himself. He put himself through university, has a new life and a girlfriend, and he's changed his last name to erase the past he fled. He is less than welcoming when Jace shows up at his doorstep with his face smashed in and no place to go.

Christian's girlfriend, Merriam, who is also a teacher, was a wonderful calming character in the midst of the chaos. After getting over the initial shock of Jace's presence, Merriam was the mediator between Christian and Jace. Though Jace took quite a while to warm up her, he eventually liked her 'meddling' and concern.

I could not believe the raw honesty of this book. I was compelled to read on and on...like one is compelled to rubberneck as they drive by the scene of an accident. Jace's honesty is so brutal; not only when he's talking to others, but also when he is internally ruminating. It's fascinating to see him come to terms with the physical abuse he fled and the heavy secrets he carried away with him. He is determined to become a new person--one who looks and acts nothing like his father--yet feels somehow stuck in the role in which he senses he belongs. This is the reason he can't quite allow himself to get close to Dakota, the girl who helps him get a new job in a bookstore in Albuquerque.

With Merriam's gentle persuasions, the brothers begin to form a new kind of reality. Christian, though, is unwilling to talk about the beatings he took from his father. Christian has truly put the past behind him. In his new life, the old life just did not happen. The wall he built for himself begins to crumble, though, with Jace's arrival into his carefully crafted life.

Avasthi has woven a remarkable story of physical abuse in a family setting. Not only that, she has perfected the relationship of brothers flung into this terrible reality. The guilt, the silence, the covering up and the taking on abuse for others. Everything is just so real that it splits you down the middle. It was such an emotional rollercoaster of a read. I couldn't read it fast enough. There was so much riding in the balance. The highest stakes, for this reader, was the relationship between the brothers. Such an important relationship, that of siblings. I had to find out if Christian and Jace would make it. I needed to know.

I really don't want to give too much away. Buckle up, because this is a ride you have to take. It's a serious and believable ride. One that will let you see exactly what goes on behind the closed doors of a house ruled by the iron fist of an abusive parent/spouse. You have to read Split.
Windbearer
Not a book I would say I enjoyed or that was fun to read but it was a good read and a good story with compelling characters that were well written in a situation that isn't/wasn't good but is probably something that could happen, probably does happen in real life, sadly. Abusive home life, kid runs; goes to stay with his brother who got out years before. Neither of them have a real idea of how to relate to each other or how to be a family that isn't abusive. I can't say I enjoyed reading it. It was sometimes a hard read, but it was a good read and the ending was strong and compelling and was not a hollywood ending. I'm not going to say more because I don't want to give anything away.
Wen
Surviving well those tenous teenage years can be probelmatic by virtue of the emotional pressures coupled with the physical changes associated with growing up. Now add a powerful, and abusive father, and an emotionally weak mother coping with a long-term abusive relationship, and you have a powerhouse of a story of a young man survivng even though it means leaving (Split) his home, seeking refuge, continuing with school and sports, wondering what will become of his mother, falling in love, standing tall, wondering if he is destined to repeat his upbringing. One asks, "Why do people stay in abusive relationships. . and what toll does this take on children of abuse?" How do young people recognize, survive and even overcome.
Jugami
This book is something I really needed to read here in my early 20s, the story is gripping and I see my life paralleling the MC of this books for a few times. It makes you care about who you are reading about and gives the MC his own flaws that make you want to see his journey to overcome them. I adored this book and hopefully you will also
Phain
I am more than willing to re-read this book over and over again. You sympathize with the characters even when they make the wrong choices.
betelgeuze
Ms. Avasthi has done a beautiful job of dealing with the sensitive issue of domestic violence. Her main characters are very real as are their ways of dealing (or not dealing) with their problems. I found both brothers' girlfriends very appealing, and they provided an extra emotional dimension which gave us additional insight into the psychological makeup of both brothers. Highly Recommended!
With stories about abuse, it's easy to over do it or recycle other stories about abuse. Not so with this book. Yes, the descriptions of the abuse are terrible and brutal, but the psychology behind the characters' motivations and their actions are spot on. No faking it here, this author did her research. The reality factor of this book alone makes it worth the read. Beyond that, the characters are very likable and watching the brothers' relationship evolve and grow is heartwarming. I found myself rooting for all the characters in different ways, and sympathizing with their plights. All in all, this is a great, intense, heart-breaking and ultimately triumphant read, and I highly recommend it.