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eBook Gladiator, Level 4, Penguin Readers (Penguin Readers, Level 4) download

by Peter Gram

eBook Gladiator, Level 4, Penguin Readers (Penguin Readers, Level 4) download ISBN: 0582471176
Author: Peter Gram
Publisher: Pearson ESL; 1st edition (April 3, 2001)
Language: English
Pages: 80
ePub: 1739 kb
Fb2: 1193 kb
Rating: 4.7
Other formats: docx lrf doc txt
Category: Teenager
Subcategory: Literature and Fiction

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The official home of Penguin Books USA, publishers of bestselling fiction, nonfiction, classics, and children's books. Sign me up for the latest news from Penguin Random House, including Children’s books, special offers, and promotions. Life in the Gobi Desert. Alexander Hamilton: American Hero. Barbara Lowell Illustrator: George Ermos.

rnGladiator rnrnPenguin Readers Level 4 rn(1700 words) rn rnGeneral Maximus is admired by his men and by the . Gladiator - Penguin Readers Level 4. Published by: Pffy (Karma: 78. 1) on 7 March 2007 Views: 17183.

rnGladiator rnrnPenguin Readers Level 4 rn(1700 words) rn rnGeneral Maximus is admired by his men and by the Emperor Marcus Aurelius. But when the Emperors son murders his way. Publication.

Series: Penguin Readers, Level 4. Paperback: 80 pages. The second star I gave the book is for Maximus, because even when reduced to this level of shallowness, I still love him. The third star is for the first several chapters, which give sufficient detail of the opening battle sequence and even seem to promise a bit of character depth. Unfortunately, this promise dies with Marcus Aurelius.

Home Peter Gram Gladiator, Level 4, Penguin Readers (Penguin Readers, Level 4). Stock Image. Bibliographic Details. Publisher: Pearson ESL. Gladiator, Level 4, Penguin Readers (Penguin Readers, Level 4). Peter Gram. ISBN 10: 0582471176, ISBN 13: 9780582471177. Publication Date: 2001.

Level 4. Intermediate. Book 14 Level 4 Intermediate. In Australia, where people are still alive, Peter and Mary Holmes are trying to live their lives as normally as possible as the radiation comes closer and closer. 14 Level 4 Intermediate.

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Activity worksheets LEVEL 4 Gladiator Photocopiable Chapters 1–2 While reading 1 What . Find reasons for your answers in the book. a Maximus is against fights to death to entertain people. c b The Greek secretary has a real chance of becoming free.

Activity worksheets LEVEL 4 Gladiator Photocopiable Chapters 1–2 While reading 1 What/ Who do the words in italics refer to? Page 2: Quintus shook his head. a) He’s been gone for about two hours, he said. c Gladiator - Activity worksheets of 2 Activity worksheets PENGUIN READERS Teacher Support Programme LEVEL 4 Gladiator Photocopiable c The fights between gladiators and Proximo’s new boys were fair.

Penguin readers level 4: gladiator Gram, Dewey Неизвестно 9780582471177 : Level 4 intermediate reader .

Penguin readers level 4: gladiator Gram, Dewey Неизвестно 9780582471177 : Level 4 intermediate reader, 1700 words. As a singer and songwriter, Gram Parsons stood at the nexus of countless musical crossroads, and he sold his soul to the devil at every one. His intimates and collaborators included Keith Richards, William Burroughs, Marianne Faithfull, Peter Fonda, Roger McGuinn, and Clarence White. Parsons led the Byrds to create the seminal country rock masterpiece Sweetheart of the Rodeo, helped to guide the Rolling Stones beyond the blues in their appreciation of American roots music, and found his musical soul mate in Emmylou Harris.

Soon Maximus is a prisoner, then a slave, and finally a gladiator. NEW Penguin Readers 5: Great Gatsby, Book/CD Pack.

Gladiator: A Hero Will Rise: Level 4 (+ CD). Английский язык. Maximus is a general in the Roman army. After his last battle he wants to return to his family. But the new Emperor Commodus hates Maximus, and kills his family. Soon Maximus is a prisoner, then a slave, and finally a gladiator. When Emperor Commodus joins Maximus in the arena they fight for their lives. The Canterville Ghost & Other Stories: Level 4 (+ CD). Школьникам и абитуриентам, Английский язык.

General Maximus Meridas, a hero of the Roman empire, is forced into exile by the Emperor Commodus and is captured and sold into slavery, where he learns a new type of warfare as a gladiator.
Comments: (7)
Lanionge
I really wanted this book to be great. The fact that a movie like this one, with such scope and depth and beauty and struggle, was novelized in less than 250 pages, should have been a serious clue to me that I was wanting too much. This book is little more than a transcript; it is exactly, scene for scene, the movie (including the deleted scenes).

The writer fails to keep the reader in second-century Rome because 21st-century American phraseology continually creeps into his descriptions: "whipped to a frenzy," "cheering his head off," etc. Even some of the dialogue has been "updated" for today's audience, including some of the most memorable movie lines: "The Emperor has been slain" becomes "The Emperor was murdered," and "Is this not why you are here?" is reduced to "Is this not why you came?" Converting "we shall" to "we'll" is simply insulting to the reader who loves this movie's sense of setting. Besides (and more importantly than) this, Mr. Gram writes with a choppy style that remains in third person objective for most of the story, rarely peeking into characters' minds and, therefore, never finding their hearts.

The second star I gave the book is for Maximus, because even when reduced to this level of shallowness, I still love him. The third star is for the first several chapters, which give sufficient detail of the opening battle sequence and even seem to promise a bit of character depth. Unfortunately, this promise dies with Marcus Aurelius. The characters of this movie deserve a book that is rich both in historical detail and in emotional depth, but instead they got this, an ultra-quick read that reveals absolutely nothing new.
lets go baby
The book was the correct book advertised. I though I was purchasing the novel. I tried to return it and purchase the correct book. I was willing to pay for return shipping but was denied the return of the book. No I have a book that I do not want and I have to keep it. I bought the correct book from another seller and will never shop from Peter Gram again.
Arar
Okay! Okay! So it's a tie-in, so I have already seen the movie like 5 times! So I have went nuts and went online to buy everything Gladiator-related! Does this mean it's not a good read, or that I am not a trusted reviewer? Certainly not! Buy it. You will enjoy it! And it adds certain things sure to show up in the Editor's version of the DVD. Hint. Hint. Also, some nicely colored photos from the movie. It's worth every single cent!
the monster
This book, although well-written, was based solely on the screenplay. Therefore, if you are looking for further insight into the minds of the characters, you may feel disappointed. However, because the movie moves at such a lightning pace, this book succeeded in clarifying things I missed or that were unclear (i.e., Roman Empire history, what SPQR stands for, etc.). I recommend it as a nice addition to seeing the movie but it would have been better if the character development went deeper than it did.
Walan
Let's start with this novelization's strong points. First, it is utterly faithful to events in the film, which I've seen several times. You can almost hear the Zimmer/Gerrard soundtrack as you read it.
The book preserves a great deal of the film's energy, intensity, pace, and hits all the high points. Some of the characterization is handled with remarkable economy.
The book provides some information on Roman tactics and geography that a reader, or a viewer unfamiliar with Rome, can benefit from. It's compulsively readable, a page-turner from start to finish.
But....
(you knew I was going to say that...)
It could have and should have been more, even given the constraints of novelizing a film such as approval by Dreamworks, confidentiality, and the speed with which these books must be written.
Some of the Latin -- starting with the gladiators' battleground itself -- is inaccurate, and I'd probably quibble with some of the ways that Mr. Gram has described tactics. I've already gotten into one argument about the size of an Aurelian as opposed to a Caesarean legion, but I was pleased he got the Syrian archers.
I was fascinated by the way he handled the pyrotechnics in the first battle scene, even though I'm not sure the Romans used pitch in such a way. I know they used boiling oil. I know they used naphtha, although probably not in Germania. Okay, these are quibbles that make the experience of reading the book and watching it and arguing with friends enjoyable, and if you're not interested in details of military history, strategy, and tactics, they shouldn't get in your way.
What got in my way of truly enjoying this book was some of the language. As an earlier reviewer remarked, the book offers little in the way of additional sightlines or psychological insight into the main characters, and these are things I look for in a novelization.
And I kept "falling out of the story" because of the language. In a couple of places, Mr. Gram used metaphors that were really inappropriate for the time and place. Commodus is described as a "vampire." Okay, the Romans had such things -- striges and lamiae -- but modern usage is such that I was jarred for a moment. In another place, he compares something in Rome to something from the middle ages, abruptly throwing readers forward in time.
And he put more weight on adverbs than they are really intended to bear in trying to create an atmosphere of power or splendor: that's telling, not showing and, frankly, I put it down to the problems of writing novelizations.
Still, the author has succeeded in what has to be his greatest purpose: an accurate representation of an exciting film. (And the photos really are great.)