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eBook Hope Was Here download

by Joan Bauer

eBook Hope Was Here download ISBN: 0142404241
Author: Joan Bauer
Publisher: Puffin Books; Reissue edition (June 2, 2005)
Language: English
Pages: 186
ePub: 1733 kb
Fb2: 1842 kb
Rating: 4.7
Other formats: doc txt azw lrf
Category: Teenager
Subcategory: Literature and Fiction

Books by. JOAN BAUER. Published by the Penguin Group.

Books by. Penguin Group (USA) In. 345 Hudson Street, New York, New York 10014, . Penguin Group (Canada), 10 Alcorn Avenue, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M4V 3B2. (a division of Pearson Penguin Canada In. Penguin Books Ltd, 80 Strand, London WC2R 0RL, England. Penguin Ireland, 25 St Stephen’s Green, Dublin 2, Ireland (a division of Penguin Books Ltd)

The book begins with sixteen-year-old Hope leaving New York behind and heading out to Wisconsin with her adopted mother, Addie, for yet another new food adventure.

The book begins with sixteen-year-old Hope leaving New York behind and heading out to Wisconsin with her adopted mother, Addie, for yet another new food adventure. But when we meet her, Hope is becoming weary of the road and her and Addie's always-changing homes. Hope is feeling particularly disgruntled at this latest move, because it came after their NY diner business partner, Gleason Beal, took off with another waitress and all of Addie's life savings.

Luckily for us, Joan Bauer has written several other books for young adults, including BACKWATER, RULES OF THE ROAD, and SQUASHED. They're just as good as HOPE WAS HERE, too, and that's saying something!.

Joan Bauer, who won the Los Angeles Times Book Prize for Rules of the Road, has served up a delicious novel in. .And I think she's the main reason that, despite being a 16-year-old narrator, Joan Bauer's & Was Here' is a proud middle-grade book.

Joan Bauer, who won the Los Angeles Times Book Prize for Rules of the Road, has served up a delicious novel in Hope Was Here, full of delectable characters, tasty wit, and deep-dish truth. Ages 12 and older) -Patty Campbell. From Publishers Weekly. This one also had me crying buckets by the end - as much for the story as to be leaving behind this cast of characters who I so enjoyed spending a little bit of time with. This is a beautiful, heartfelt book that asks big life questions in a small-town setting.

Joan Baehler Bauer (born July 12, 1951) is an American writer of young . Bauer's first book, Squashed, was set in rural Iowa Hope Was Here features Hope Yancey, a 16-year-old waitress in small-town Wisconsin.

Joan Baehler Bauer (born July 12, 1951) is an American writer of young adult literature currently residing in Brooklyn. Bauer was born in River Forest, Illinois. She currently resides in Brooklyn, New York with her husband Evan Bauer. They are the parents of one daughter, Jean. Before becoming a famous author Joan spent years working for McGraw-Hill and the Chicago Tribune  .

Hope Was Here "Its triumph is the way in which Bauer manages to recount the internecine politics and power struggles of a small, midwestern town" - Michael Thorn, The Scotsman.

Ace teenage waitress, Hope Yancey, and her aunt Addie move from Brooklyn to work in a diner in Mulhoney WI, where their new boss is recovering from leukemia and getting ready to run for mayor to clean up the corruption in town. When it comes to creating strong, independent, and funny teenaged female characters, Bauer is in a class by herself. Winner of the Newbery Honor Award. Its triumph is the way in which Bauer manages to recount the internecine politics and power struggles of a small, midwestern town" - Michael Thorn, The Scotsman. Food is in 16-year-old Hope’s blood.

Joan Bauer is the criticallyacclaimed author of numerous young adult novels, including "Best Foot Forward," "Rules of the Road" (recipient of the "Los Angeles Times" Book Prize) and Newbery Honor-winner Hope Was Here. She lives in Brooklyn, New York. Библиографические данные. Hope Was Here Thorndike Press large print young adult series Thorndike Young Adult.

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Published by Thriftbooks. com User, 17 years ago. How would you like your name to be Tulip?

Published by Thriftbooks. How would you like your name to be Tulip?

A Newbery Honor BookJoan Bauer's beloved Newbery Honor book--now with a great new look for middle grade readers! When Hope and her aunt move to small-town Wisconsin to take over the local diner, Hope's not sure what to expect. But what they find is that the owner, G.T., isn't quite ready to give up yet--in fact, he's decided to run for mayor against a corrupt candidate. And as Hope starts to make her place at the diner, she also finds herself caught up in G.T.'s campaign--particularly his visions for the future. After all, as G.T. points out, everyone can use a little hope to help get through the tough times . . . even Hope herself. Filled with heart, charm, and good old-fashioned fun, this is Joan Bauer at her best. 

* “When it comes to creating strong, independent, and funny teenaged female characters, Bauer is in a class by herself ... Bauer tells a fast-paced, multilayered story with humor but does not gloss over the struggle[s].”—School Library Journal, starred review “Bauer has succeeded in creating another quirky, poignant, and funny novel about a strong girl who admits her frailties ... Hope’s story is highly recommended for both middle and high school students.”—VOYA “Another entry in Bauer’s growing collection of books about likable and appealing female teenagers with a strong vocational calling ... As always from Bauer, this novel is full of humor, starring a strong and idealistic protagonist, packed with funny lines, and peopled with interesting and quirky characters.” —Kirkus Reviews

Comments: (7)
Wafi
Hope's mother was meant to be a waitress more than a parent. That's why after Hope was born prematurely, she left Hope with her aunt Addie and never looked back (though she does send Christmas newsletters). Just about the only thing Hope's biological mother left her was a bad name (Tulip) which she has had legally changed... plus a talent for waitressing, and frequent tips on how to get good tips.

Addie has been the best mother a girl could ask for. Her pancakes are legendary, her pies are criminal and her meatloaf is drool-worthy. It's Addie's job to show up at diners that need help, get them back on their feet and then take off for parts unknown again. Which means she has dragged Hope and a U-Haul all around America - and Hope has made friends and said goodbye to them in countless states, always leaving behind the scribbled words `Hope was Here' in some unassuming place.

Now Addie and Hope are coming to Wisconsin, to help out a man called G.T. - owner of the "Welcome Stairways" diner who has recently been diagnosed with leukaemia, and needs a helping hand to keep the restaurant going while he recovers.

But that's not all G.T. needs help with. He figures that since he's dying, he has nothing to lose - so he's taking on the local mayor, Eli Millstone, and the big business Dairy factory and running for local candidacy. G.T. intends to take on the corruption that is rife in town, bring down the tax-evading dairy factory, and Eli who is lining his pockets with dirty dealings.

Helping G.T. accomplish his clean political campaign is young cook, Braverman, who Hope develops a small fascination with. Local pastor and best friend, high school politician called Adam and a slew of small-town customers.

Hope isn't really used to permanency, or trusting people. But since coming to Wisconsin and seeing the integrity with which G.T. is trying to win a hopeless campaign ... well, it's got Hope trying to live up to her very big name.

`Hope Was Here' is a Newbery Honor book, written by Joan Bauer in 2000.

`Hope Was Here' is continuing my love of Newbery Honor books, another sweet gem of the middle-grade readership that I gobbled up in one train ride. The book begins with sixteen-year-old Hope leaving New York behind and heading out to Wisconsin with her adopted mother, Addie, for yet another new food adventure. But when we meet her, Hope is becoming weary of the road and her and Addie's always-changing homes. Hope is feeling particularly disgruntled at this latest move, because it came after their NY diner business partner, Gleason Beal, took off with another waitress and all of Addie's life savings.

Hope is a most interesting character; because when we meet her life has already beaten her down and moulded her some. She admits that it took a short boxing career to punch out her built-up anger at her mother; anger for leaving her as a sick baby, anger for not being the mothering type, anger for still calling her `Tulip' when she changed her name to Hope. After the Gleason Beal debacle, Hope is both saddened but not all that surprised at the betrayal. Here we are meeting a kid who is already world-weary, and if it wasn't for Addie being her constant and comfort, she would have a completely negative outlook on life.

Hope's low-expectations of people are confounded by her having to leave the best ones behind. She finds that making friends is the first step to accepting a new place as home, but having had to leave so many people she loves behind, she has taken to not making promises of seeing them ever again (though she does write them). When we meet her in Wisconsin, she's really feeling down and out;

So, of course, the stickler of `Hope Was Here' is reading Hope change her outlook on life, and try living up to her name. The journey Hope has to go on has an obvious end-result, but it's the way Joan Bauer gets her there that's so darn great.

When Hope and Addie arrive at the "Welcome Stairways" diner, they don't realise they're stepping into brewing political warfare. Diner owner, G.T. is dying and intends to fight against small town corruption with his last breath. He is the embodiment of everything Hope isn't right now - he may not be a permanent fixture of this earth for much longer, but he's intending to do the most he can with what little time he has left. He can't promise people that he'll even be able to complete a full term if elected, but he can show them that he intends to do the best job he can for however long this illness he's battling will let him.

I loved this book. Hope is an exceptional narrator - I sort of see her as this girl who's fighting a grin, so sometimes it looks like she has pursed-lips from sucking on sour grapes so long, but really that grimace is just a smile waiting to break out. Her thoughts sometimes turn dark - when she thinks about the mother that didn't want her, or the people she has had to leave behind - but her namesake is often bigger than her woes and she's this girl who is constantly breaking out in sunshine, despite the rain. I loved her. And I think she's the main reason that, despite being a 16-year-old narrator, Joan Bauer's `Hope Was Here' is a proud middle-grade book.

This one also had me crying buckets by the end - as much for the story as to be leaving behind this cast of characters who I so enjoyed spending a little bit of time with.

This is a beautiful, heartfelt book that asks big life questions in a small-town setting. Hope is one of the best narrators, and Joan Bauer's book is being added to my list of favourite Newbery's
Naa
What a funny, heartwarming, bittersweet book! Joan Bauer's "Hope Was Here" is perfectly written. Hope was left by her mother, Deena, as a young, sick, fatherless baby, originally named Tulip, and given to Hope's aunt, Addie, a cook. So Hope spends her life moving from one place to the other, and in some cases, as a waitress. In "Hope Was Here", Hope and Addie move to Mulhoney, Wisconsin to work for a leukemia-diagnosed man, after their money was stolen from their previous boss, in Brooklyn. In Mulhoney, Hope finds herself in a crazy political race, while managing the busy restaurant. I highly recommend it!
Umi
The story is good, its an easy read and allows you to cheer for the good guys over the obvious bad.

BUT the author would do well to research treatment for leukemia. I have about 50 pages left to go and can hardly stand it. "reports of GT leukemia going into his brain....leukemia is a blood cancer..... so its in the blood.... perhaps you meant it crossed over to the CNS. Which I know the bad guys are wrongly reporting, but if that were the case,GT would be hospitalized and they would be proved wrong quickly. This after I spent a good about of time trying to ignore the fact that if he was in active treatment getting leukemia into remission, he couldn't be doing all he was doing. That is the first stage of treatment and its an intense brutal one. Should have picked a different cancer maybe??
Beazezius
This is a book about a girl who is rejected by her mother, raised by her aunt and in search of her father. The yearning of every teen who wishes to be loved, held and wanted is in the heart of Hope. Her exterior tuffness is played out well in a diner environment where a thick skin is a job requirement.

Some of the objections posted here I find unfounded. Hope's entire motivation in life is to seek out the love she misses from her MIA Dad while trying to accept her AWOL mother's attitude. She finds comfort in her imaginations about a loving father and ekes out bits of value from her mother's advice about waiting on tables. These two merge as a force that drives her forward in the book. Her head is motivated by her desire to be the best server and her heart by drawing near to a father. It's all there and justifies all her actions.

Oh, there's one other motivation that fills any open gaps, her devotion to her aunt. I found that everything she does is propelled by these.

I too felt a flaw in the book is the simplification of politics. The Mayor character is too flat, the Cheese company is Vadar like. But unlike one reviewer I saw the politics the other way around. Wisconsin can be a very blue state and small local politics is often devoid of real national issues. So I saw these as liberal people grasping for control, using corporations badly. Despite the usual corporate metaphors and our national rhetoric, we all know that dirty machine politics is the sole domain of no one party. Heck, the Dems wrote the book on corporate, government and local domination at Tammany Hall.

But after a momentary bit of labeling, I discarded the cliches. The story transcended party politics. Its about struggle, finding a cause that's worthy and keeping hope alive.

Integrity, love and hope are universal. This book weves these three qualities into a dramatic stroy that touched my family.

Can't wait for the movie version.
Fomand
Our 10 year old grandson read this book recently, and I read it as well so that we could discuss it. It is a wonderful peak into a world where most children have little knowledge. The young protagonist who has been given up at birth by her mother is raised by a loving aunt but has to move continually because of the aunt's jobs. The story tells of a child's struggle to find a way to feel that she has roots somewhere.

Normally, I would have said that this is more of a book for girls. However our grandson was fascinated by the story and introduced to some sensitivities that all children can identify with regardless of their gender.