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by Tara Sands,Carrie Ryan

eBook The Dead-Tossed Waves (Forest of Hands and Teeth) download ISBN: 0307710300
Author: Tara Sands,Carrie Ryan
Publisher: Listening Library (Audio); Unabridged edition (March 9, 2010)
Language: English
ePub: 1579 kb
Fb2: 1494 kb
Rating: 4.2
Other formats: mobi azw txt lrf
Category: Teenager
Subcategory: Literature and Fiction

Carrie Ryan (Author), Tara Sands (Reader).

Carrie Ryan (Author), Tara Sands (Reader). Book 2 of 4 in the Forest of Hands and Teeth Series. When The Dead-Tossed Waves centered on Gabry and friends race to elude the undead and the Recruiters, I enjoyed this book. As long as Gabry was reacting to all of the near-death situations she is constantly confronted with, I thought this was a tense, exciting read. As soon as Gabry started her endless internal monologues, I was jarred out of the story and wished she would just.

The Forest of Hands and Teeth. They said it reminded them of the before time

The Forest of Hands and Teeth. the light on the horizon that means home. They said it reminded them of the before time. When they didn’t have to worry about people rising from the dead, when they didn’t have to build fences and walls and barriers to protect themselves from the masses of Mudo constantly seeking human flesh. When the living weren’t forever hunted. They said it made them feel normal. And so even while the Mudo-neighbors and friends who’d been infected, died and Returned-pulled at the fences surrounding the amusement park, they kept the rides moving.

The Dead-Tossed Waves book . Gabry lives a quiet life  . Also I think The Dead-Tossed Waves is written better than The Forest of Hands and Teeth. Before I go on, I need to mention that I'm not a fan of the love triangle in this book.

But there are threats the Barrier cannot hold back. Threats like the secrets Gabry’s mother thought she left behind when she escaped from the Sisterhood and the Forest of Hands and Teeth. Like the cult of religious zealots who worship the dead

But there are threats the Barrier cannot hold back. Like the cult of religious zealots who worship the dead. Like the stranger from the forest who seems to know Gabry. And suddenly, everything is changing. One reckless moment, and half of Gabry’s generation is dead, the other half imprisoned.

The Forest of Hands of and Teeth (2009) spliced classic zombie mythos into a world that was one part postapocalypse . When The Dead-Tossed Waves centered on Gabry and friends race to elude the undead and the Recruiters, I enjoyed this book

The Forest of Hands of and Teeth (2009) spliced classic zombie mythos into a world that was one part postapocalypse and one part colonial America and drove the plot with a healthy surge of teen hormones. This companion piece, which features some returning characters in minor roles, involves another discontented young woman, Gabry.

The Forest of Hands and Teeth is a New York Times best-selling post-apocalyptic zombie novel by first-time author Carrie Ryan that is marketed to young adults. It was published in 2009 by Random House Delacorte Press in the United States, and by Hachette Gollancz in Australia and the United Kingdom. This is the first volume of a trilogy; the second book in the series, The Dead-Tossed Waves, was released on March 9, 2010 and The Dark and Hollow Places followed in March 2011

The Dead-Tossed Waves. Authors: Carrie Ryan. Claim the "The Dead-Tossed Waves. A Game of Firsts (The Forest of Hands And Teeth).

The Dead-Tossed Waves.

Carrie Ryan, The Dead-Tossed Waves. Thank you for reading books on GrayCity. Other author's books: The Dead-Tossed Waves. The Forest of Hands and Teeth. Daughter of Deep Silence. Shadows of the Lost Sun. Flotsam & Jetsam. The Map to Everywhere. The Dark and Hollow Places.

Gabry lives a quiet life. As safe a life as is possible in a town trapped between a forest and the ocean, in a world teeming with the dead, who constantly hunger for those still living. She’s content on her side of the Barrier, happy to let her friends dream of the Dark City up the coast while she watches from the top of her lighthouse. But there are threats the Barrier cannot hold back. Threats like the secrets Gabry’s mother thought she left behind when she escaped from the Sisterhood and the Forest of Hands and Teeth. Like the cult of religious zealots who worship the dead. Like the stranger from the forest who seems to know Gabry. And suddenly, everything is changing. One reckless moment, and half of Gabry’s generation is dead, the other half imprisoned. Now Gabry only knows one thing: she must face the forest of her mother’s past in order to save herself and the one she loves.From the Hardcover edition.
Comments: (7)
Ann
Just finished this book a second ago, and was happy with it as a whole.

Ryan's writing style is unique. Some people will take issue with that; they will not be able to get accustomed to the lack of adjectives and the "inner voice" monologue going on throughout. But I think a certain beauty is in that which is different.

It's true: there is a voracious amount of inner dialogue in this book. The protagonist talks about how she's frightened very often, and about how she doesn't see a point in pushing on through the zombie apocalypse. But that's the only "con" I can see here. The rest of the novel makes you think, makes you fall in love with the new characters, ties up some loose ends from the last novel, adds to the overall worldbuilding and look & feel of what surrounds their villages.

I REALLY liked the character development. I also felt like I was there with the characters, living it with them. I know that sounds odd, but Ryan really does write in such a way that it feels like you're right there, living it with them. Putting yourself in their shoes, urging them to take the next step. And then they do, and it's magnificent.
Unsoo
This is the second book in The Forest of Hands and Teeth series. Gabry, a teenaged girl, lives in a lighthouse with her mother, Mary. On a dare from her friend Cira, she goes outside the fence with a group of teenagers, including Cira’s brother, Catcher to an abandoned amusement park. What was a lark becomes a tragedy as they are beset upon by the Mudo, infected with the zombie virus. While Gabry escapes, Cira and many of the others are either killed or captured upon their return and sentenced to work as soldiers/guards in the city, which is a death sentence for most. Cira begs Gabry to find her brother, who she finds has been bitten. Along her perilous trip she meets the mysterious Elias who keeps her safe and provides some key insight into Catcher’s condition. Her mother’s revelation and disappearance, along with some trying circumstances lead to an escape into the Forest and to secrets of Gabry’s past. While uneven, at times, I appreciated the building of the world mythos and would have liked to have learned more. I am hoping that the third book will provide some resolution to the story.
Braendo
I am trying to finish up some series that I started reading, and Carrie Ryan's zombie series is at the top of the list. I love the world-building; zombies have been decimating the human population for decades, cutting off the remaining human settlements. Life revolves around not getting eaten by zombies. A bite will turn a normal, healthy human into a slavering, mindless monster. Walls and fences have been erected around the towns and villages to keep the creatures out, and Gabry's mother, who lives in the lighthouse, must patrol the shoreline and dispatch any of the undead that the tide brings in. Gabry is content with her life; she obeys the rules, helps her mom, and tries to stay out of trouble. This makes one giant lapse in judgment on her part almost inconceivable. Bowing to peer pressure, she sneaks over the wall to go to the old roller coaster, putting herself, and her entire village, at risk. Gabry and her friends are, predictably, attacked by a zombie, and the consequences of her breaking the rules will have repercussions she could never have guessed at. It sends her on a harrowing race through the Forest of Hands and Teeth, in search of her past, and in search of the truth.

While I love the deadly, menacing world where Gabry lives, I was not so enamored with Gabry herself. I found her so shallow and immature, and I could not relate to her. Even after the disastrous outing beyond the Barrier, a willful act that destroys most of her generation of teens from Vista, she tells herself that she wouldn't change a thing about that night, because then she and Catcher would never have brushed their together. Wait? What?! Most of her friends are either killed or turned into zombies, or are going to be banished from the village, and that's okay, because why? She and her crush, Catcher, brushed lips together. They don't even share a proper toe-curling kiss! No, they brush lips, and that life-altering experience was worth the cost of several lives, including her best friend forever, Cira. This made no sense to me, and made me dislike Gabry intensely.

When The Dead-Tossed Waves centered on Gabry and friends race to elude the undead and the Recruiters, I enjoyed this book. As long as Gabry was reacting to all of the near-death situations she is constantly confronted with, I thought this was a tense, exciting read. As soon as Gabry started her endless internal monologues, I was jarred out of the story and wished she would just. Stop. Talking! to herself. I think that I felt this way because she established herself to me as a self-possessed, self-involved, and selfish woman who always put her own desires ahead of everyone else's. When her mother makes confessions about her past, Gabry rejects her, condemning her for lying to her. This bothered me because Mary's whole life revolved around making a safe, secure home for Gabry, which was something that she didn't really have when she was a girl. For Gabry to abruptly turn her back on her mother, to let her venture off into the Forest by herself, I just couldn't forgive her for that. Gabry had already crossed the Barrier several times by herself, which was strictly forbidden, yet she was willing to let Mary go alone. She was too scared to go with the woman who loved her and raised her, but she was willing to put herself in harm's way if a cute boy was waiting for her? That just didn't say much about Gabry's strength of character, and since I didn't respect her, I had a hard time liking her. She does come around by the end of the book, but it was a little too late for me.

That said, I did enjoy aspects of the book. I just didn't not like the protagonist. I'm disappointed that I didn't enjoy The Dead-Tossed Waves more, and I am hoping that The Dark and Hallow Places will be more up my alley.

Grade: C+
Cetnan
"'Then what's the point of making any memories?' I ask her, my voice heated. My shoulders tense with agitation. 'What's the point of any of it if all we're supposed to do is forget?'"

"They appear almost human in death, more human than they seemed just moments ago. And I wonder again what we lose when we die and if we retain anything of what we used to be when we Return."

The second book in the series seemed deeper to me. The first book was this shocking tragedy that showed what life had become after a zombie apocalypse. How creative we became in sustaining life. The second book tried to search for meaning in all of this. And while there were no zombie babies thrown out windows we did have zombies with broken off jaws and no teeth traveling on leashes with humans. Very reminiscent of Walking Dead. Makes me wonder if it was derived from the Robert Kirkman's comic books or if the same idea happened to come to both. Either way it's awesome. And I love that there are cult's that worship zombies in this book. In many ways the survivor's are almost scarier than the zombies at times.