carnevalemanfredonia.it
» » JSA, Book 12: Ghost Stories

eBook JSA, Book 12: Ghost Stories download

by Rags Morales,Paul Levitz

eBook JSA, Book 12: Ghost Stories download ISBN: 1401211968
Author: Rags Morales,Paul Levitz
Publisher: DC Comics (January 3, 2007)
Language: English
Pages: 144
ePub: 1740 kb
Fb2: 1903 kb
Rating: 4.5
Other formats: lrf doc mobi azw
Category: Teenager
Subcategory: Literature and Fiction

JSA Vol. 12: GHOST STORIES collects the final issues of this very popular JSA incarnation. Here, veteran Paul Levitz takes over writing duties from Geoff Johns (only to have Johns later return to the helm for the new JUSTICE SOCIETY OF AMERICA series).

JSA Vol. All six issues in this trade form one extended arc, making it a solid read in terms of continuity. Levitz crafts an interesting story, featuring formerly notorious British highwayman Jim Craddock, two hundred years dead and gone all spooky as the Golden Age supervillain, the Gentleman Ghost.

Written by Paul Levitz and features art from Luke Ross, George Perez, Rags Morales, and Jerry Ordway, JSA 12: Ghost Stories follows JSA 11: Mixed Signals.

During World War II, a group of costumed mystery men formed the first. Written by Paul Levitz and features art from Luke Ross, George Perez, Rags Morales, and Jerry Ordway, JSA 12: Ghost Stories follows JSA 11: Mixed Signals. The collection represents the last issues of the JSA title before its relaunch as Justice Society of America. The series collects the JSA’s crossover with the cross-company title Infinite Crisis and the post-Infinite Crisis One Year Later storyline. I enjoy the JSA, but JSA 12: Ghost Stories represents a hodgepodge of stories that don’t feel very complete.

JSA, Vol. 12: Ghost Stories.

Be grateful for whoever comes, because each has been sent as a guide from beyond. JSA, Vol. by Paul Levitz · George Pérez · Rags Morales · Jerry Ordway · Luke Ross.

The new story by Paul Levitz, Rags Morales, Dave Meikis and Luke Ross continues! The JSA's darkest secrets are laid bare by one of their most mysterious enemies as the battle is brought to the team's front door! Jsa Jsa (1999 - 2006).

Find nearly any book by Rags Morales. Rags Morales (Morales, Rags). used books, rare books and new books. JSA, Book 12: Ghost Stories. by Paul Levitz, Rags Morales. Get the best deal by comparing prices from over 100,000 booksellers. Find all books by 'Rags Morales' and compare prices Find signed collectible books by 'Rags Morales'. ISBN 9781848564503 (978-1-84856-450-3) Softcover, Titan. ISBN 9781401211967 (978-1-4012-1196-7) Softcover, DC Comics, 2007. Find signed collectible books: 'JSA, Book 12: Ghost Stories'.

Bibliographic Details Publisher: DC Comics. Publication Date: 2006

Bibliographic Details Publisher: DC Comics. Publication Date: 2006. Book Condition: New. Dust Jacket Condition: No Jacket. My November Guest Books caters to the needs of the discriminating reader and collector, offering quality books at reasonable prices. We don¿t use multiple exclamation points or cute slogans in our book descriptions. Instead we make every effort to accurately describe each book offered for sale.

JSA - Ghost Stories. lt; Previous Issue. 1 - Justice Be Done 2 - Darkness Falls 3 - The Return of Hawkman 4 - Fair Play 5 - Stealing Thunder 6 - Savage Times 7 - Princes of Darkness 8 - Black Reign 9 - Lost 10 - Black Vengeance 11 - Mixed Signals 12 - Ghost Stories. Green Lantern; Power Girl; Thunderbolt; Stargirl; Dr. Mid-Nite; Jakeem Thunder; Flash; Mr. Terrific; Wildcat; Ma Hunkel; Gentleman Ghost. from JSA (DC, 1999 series) (June 2006).

A new volume collecting the story arc written by Paul Levitz (LEGION OF SUPER-HEROES), presented in JSA . The JSA has been targeted by the Gentleman Ghost and his undead army.

A new volume collecting the story arc written by Paul Levitz (LEGION OF SUPER-HEROES), presented in JSA The JSA has been targeted by the Gentleman Ghost and his undead army. How will they end a supernatural slaughter when the only being who can stop it is the ghost of Batman?

After learning about the clash between Batman and Superman and the mysterious Gentleman Ghost, the JSA become haunted by the spirits of departed loved ones and begin to believe that the Ghost has returned.
Comments: (7)
Fomand
I still don't see a good enough justification for why JSA was cancelled, only so that it could be relaunched shortly after as JUSTICE SOCIETY OF AMERICA. However, exactly because it was relaunched shortly after, the aggravation factor remains a minor one. It's all good in the 'hood as long as there's a JSA safeguarding the world and being an inspiration for the younger generations of heroes. JSA Vol. 12: GHOST STORIES collects #82-87, the final issues of this very popular JSA incarnation. Here, veteran Paul Levitz takes over writing duties from Geoff Johns (only to have Johns later return to the helm for the new JUSTICE SOCIETY OF AMERICA series). All six issues in this trade form one extended arc, making it a solid read in terms of continuity.

Levitz crafts an interesting story, featuring formerly notorious British highwayman Jim Craddock, two hundred years dead and gone all spooky as the Golden Age supervillain, the Gentleman Ghost. One gripe I have with this arc is that the origin of the Gentleman Ghost is altered so soon after the version chronicled fairly recently in Hawkman's comic book. And, now, according to Levitz, it seems that Craddock's fate is no longer bound with Hawkman and Hawkgirl's. I realize that revisions and re-dos in comic books are common occurences, but, for some reason, this one cheeses me off. To me, DC (or just Levitz?) then comes off as pretty dismissive of the Gentleman Ghost. It's odd that I feel like this, because Jim Craddock to me isn't at all an intriguing character. I'm not even sure I'm explaining myself right. But the Ghost is pretty low in the totem pole in terms of significance, and I guess I feel for him as an underdog.

A gypsy's prophesy, the sagacity of a long deceased legendary hero, virgins, and a JSA member rumored to be with noble blood. These are key elements which play a part in Jim Craddock's killing quest against the Justice Society. Believing that he can live again if only the ones he hates most in the world should perish, the Gentleman Ghost begins to target the JSA.

Backtracking a bit, issue #82 presents a neat little flashback story (and sort of an INFINITE CRISIS tie-in), narrated thru the shorthand notes scribbled by Earth 2's Lois Lane. Back in 1951, Earth-2's JSA had chosen to disband rather than disclose their secret identities to Congress. In the aftermath, Superman and Batman learn that the Gentleman Ghost had rifled thru the JSA's secret files, and the World's Finest end up tangling with the intangible. This sets the stage for the story proper.

Comic book fans know that, in the wake of INFINITE CRISIS, DC titles had a narrative jump of one year ahead, with the series 52 filling in the missing gap of time. So, in this one year's lapse, the JSA apparently hadn't nearly been as active and only Mr. Terrific and Dr. Mid-Nite get together regularly and then only to play Scrabble. The main story arc begins around this time, as the spirits of dead loved ones begin to manifest themselves to JSA members, and then, of course, Craddock gets his own haunting on. These ghostly goings-on provide the impetus to formally assemble the Justice Society.

I have such a fondness for the JSA. I dig its longevity and that sense of family and of legacy being passed on to the next generation. GHOST STORIES does a good job of showcasing the more venerable - although, probably, "classic" sounds better than "venerable" - JSAers, specifically Jay Garrick (the Flash) and Alan Scott (Green Lantern). I have no problems at all that they garner so much attention here, specially since Jay Garrick is one of my favorite JSA superhero. Courtney, Jakeem and, surprisingly, Ma Hunkel also get their share of the spotlight. By the way, Levitz provides a humorous subplot with Courtney (the Star-Spangled Kid) facing off against the dreaded driving lessons.

No complaints about the artwork, except perhaps the lack of visual continuity, which isn't a big deal to me this time when the artists assembled happen to be George Perez (issue #82), Rags Morales (#83-85) and Jerry Ordway (#86-87), with Luke Ross handling artwork for the Gentleman Ghost flashbacks. It's too bad that these flashbacks still don't make me care about Jim Craddock.

By no means is GHOST STORIES the best story to come out of this series, I think mostly because the Gentleman Ghost, that despicable apparition, doesn't quite strike crippling fear into the hearts of anyone. I mean, dude's got a monocle! As such, I didn't think the threat level was all that imposing. Paul Levitz just isn't able to inject enough creepiness into the phantoms. Also, the big showdown at the end comes off as a bit weak. I was expecting more from the JSAer with noble blood than a ho-hum fighty fight. Still, the story is fast-paced enough and action-packed enough, with some neat moments (the Earth-2 Superman & Batman teaming up one more time or when Jakeem, hounded by specters, gets the Thunderbolt to summon help - and look who show up). And, again, it prominently showcases some of my more favorite folks. So, for all that, I think JSA: GHOST STORIES deserves 3.5 out of 5 stars.
Wel
In the final JSA storyline (issues 82-87) prior to its latest rebirth in the post-'Infinite Crisis' DC Universe, "Ghost Stories," is an excellent storyline designed to remind long-time comic buffs like myself that old Justice Society members from another time are still viable today. I want to congratulate writer Paul Levitz for his pretty solid plotting and dialogue, and I believe Rags Morales, George Perez, & Jerry Ordway should be commended for providing Levitz with top-notch artwork (particularly, in the flashback sequences) to make the project an inexpensive and worthwhile investment for consumers.

First, it was a real treat to see the Golden Age versions of Superman, Lois Lane, Batman, and Wonder Woman (if only in flashback) back in action in the same story after a 20+ year hiatus. Their solo encounters with the 'Gentleman' Jim Craddock (alias the "Gentleman Ghost") is a fun throwback to old-school DC Comics storytelling, as Craddock manages to elude each of these legendary characters. Unfortunately, their presence in this story can only be explained to newcomers if they have already read "Infinite Crisis," which is, unfortunately, too often a convoluted mess.

At any rate, the second chapter quickly leaps forward to the present day, where Jay 'Flash' Garrick's elderly wife is confronted by the ghost of her deceased father. This sequence is followed by several members of the JSA confronting painful ghostly memories apparently summoned by Craddock, who has seized the opportunity to settle some old scores with the original Flash, 'Green Lantern' Alan Scott, & Wildcat. He also takes great joy in eluding two of the JSA's younger members, the frustrated Power Girl and Stargirl, despite their best efforts to apprehend him.

Interspersed with the storyline is Craddock's 18th Century backstory (the art here is fantastic), which explains how he grew up from an orphaned thief to a notorious highwayman whose fate is later sealed at the gallows. His evil master plan comes to fruition in the final chapter when one JSA member is improbably the team's last hope of defeating Craddock and his ghostly army. Suffice to say, the far too convenient ancestry linking this hero to the 'Gentleman Ghost' is really one plot twist too many supplied by writer Paul Levitz.

Going back a few chapters, however, my favorite sequence occurs at its mid-point when Jakeem Thunder summons some otherwordly assistance in the form of the Golden Age Sandman, the Golden Age Batman, the Golden Age Mr. Terrific, and Jade to combat some ghostly hooligans in a barroom brawl. While Jade's depiction here doesn't seem to jive with her feisty persona last seen in Judd Winick's "Outsiders" series prior to her demise, her heartfelt relationship with her ailing father, 'Green Lantern' Alan Scott, is no doubt the most touching element of this storyline.

I will give writer Paul Levitz some credit for not overplaying his hand in attempting to explain the presence of classic (and sorely missed) Golden Age characters that DC Comics removed from its new continuity back in 1985. Levitz simply has the genie-like Thunderbolt say, "It's complicated," and leaves it at that.

Overall, "Ghost Stories," in my opinion, rates at least 8.5 on a scale of 1 to 10. At various junctures, it provides a long-awaited, nostalgic wink back at the classic (albeit convoluted) DC Universe that DC Comics conveniently chose to forget.