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eBook Mesmerized download

by David-Matthew Barnes

eBook Mesmerized download ISBN: 1602821917
Author: David-Matthew Barnes
Publisher: Bold Strokes Books (November 16, 2010)
Language: English
Pages: 264
ePub: 1796 kb
Fb2: 1634 kb
Rating: 4.7
Other formats: lit txt mbr lrf
Category: Teenager
Subcategory: Literature and Fiction

He writes in multiple genres, primarily young adult.

David-Matthew Barnes ("Wren") is an author, playwright, poet, and screenwriter. He writes in multiple genres, primarily young adult. He writes contemporary romance novels as Wren Valentino and horror films as Matthew Macola. His award-winning screenplays have earned many international accolades, including two Los Angeles Film Awards, a New York Film Award, and a European Independent Film Award. To David-Matthew Barnes ("Wren") is an author, playwright, poet, and screenwriter.

David-Matthew Barnes is a best selling author, playwright, poet, and screenwriter. He writes in multiple genres, including mysteries, thrillers, women's fiction, and young adult. He writes horror films under the pen name Declan Mayfair and contemporary romance novels under the pen name Wren Valentino. His literary work has appeared in over one hundred publications. He is a member of the Dramatists Guild of America, International Thriller Writers, and the Society of Children's Book Writers and Illustrators.

David-Matthew Barnes. David-Matthew Barnes is an author, playwright, poet, and screenwriter. Leah Cassels secretly dreams of becoming the star of a underwater mermaid show at Neptune's Cove.

While being punished for writing a controversial article in her high school paper, Serena Albright is befriended by enigmatic loner Brodie Wiles

While being punished for writing a controversial article in her high school paper, Serena Albright is befriended by enigmatic loner Brodie Wiles. Serena witnesses the first time that Brodie meets Lance Royal, who is secretly rehearsing to compete in The Showdown, the biggest dance contest of the year.

David-Matthew Barnes (born September 3, 1970) is an American novelist, playwright, poet, screenwriter, filmmaker .

David-Matthew Barnes (born September 3, 1970) is an American novelist, playwright, poet, screenwriter, filmmaker, director, actor, and teacher. Barnes is the author of four young adult novels: Mesmerized (Bold Strokes Books, 2010), Swimming to Chicago (Bold Strokes Books, 2011), Wonderland (2012), and The Marijuana Mermaids (2013). In addition, he is the author of the literary suspense novel Accidents Never Happen (Bold Strokes Books, 2011), the rock 'n' roll gay love story The Jetsetters (Bold Strokes Books, 2012), and the women's novel Ambrosia (Diva D Publishing, 2012).

Accidents Never Happen. ISBN 13: 978-1-60282-530-7. This Electronic Book is published by. Bold Strokes Books, In. . Box 249. Valley Falls, New York 12185. This is a work of fiction. Names, characters, places, and incidents are the product of the author’s imagination or are used fictitiously. Any resemblance to actual persons, living or dead, business establishments, events, or locales is entirely coincidental. This book, or parts thereof, may not be reproduced in any form without permission.

While being punished for writing a controversial article in her high school paper, Serena Albright is befriended by Brodie Wiles. Serena witnesses the first time that Brodie meets Lance Royal, who is secretly rehearsing to compete a dance contest.

The official promotional trailer for the novel SWIMMING TO CHICAGO written by David-Matthew Barnes, published in 2011. ww. avidmatthewbarnes. com ww. oldstrokesbooks.

Rainbow Award Winner for Best LGBT Coming of Age/Young Adult Novel! While being punished for writing a controversial article in her high school paper, Serena Albright is befriended by the enigmatic loner Brodie Wiles. Serena witnesses the first time that Brodie meets Lance Royal, who is secretly rehearsing to compete in The Showdown, the biggest dance contest of the year. Immediately, Serena is drawn into their world, inspired by the love she recognizes between them.Through her close friendship with Brodie and Lance, Serena finds comfort for the grief and guilt she feels over the brutal death of her older gay brother, the victim of a hate crime. Frustrated that her deep-in-denial parents spend endless hours in front of the television and refuse to acknowledge the death of their son, Serena accepts the challenge to have a face-to-face meeting with the boy who killed her brother.
Comments: (6)
INvait
This is a wonderful book. I have read it and now passing it on to my daughter. Everyone should read it.
virus
(Was Gene Loves Jezebel around in 1986? I remember them from the 90s! I'm sure this is a petty thing to look up.) So far I like the scene setting, the bands and the references to Molly Ringwald/Brat Pack films. You get the idea going in that this is set up to be all sweet 80s movie-ish. And it is, but it's more Dead Poets Society than Breakfast Club; serious and sad, painful honest in the way that stories about the loss of innocence are. Outsider viewpoint of a teenage gay rights activist/future journalism major is pretty good; means she's interested in getting the facts right but also a bit clouded by romanticism and by the lingering echoes of a painful event in her family's recent history. Her personal story (at least so far, 40 some pages in) is compelling, and her watching the unfolding romance between her friends is almost a distraction from her own upturned life. She's a teenager, and it shows; when she sees how lost her parents have become she doesn't feel like she can help them, just wants to escape to college. The number of things she doesn't know about her own friends and family is fitting for her age and situation. There's a feeling that she wants to be friends with the boy she suspects is gay as a chance to re-do things with her dead brother, to make amends. So the story isn't /really/ the romance between Lance and Brodie, but about Serena coming to terms with the murder of her brother. (And Lance and Brodie remind me of Chris and Ryan a bit, especially when Serena sees them dancing and says 'They made me want to fall in love.') 'Mesmerized' is a story about grief--the varied, unpredictable, insconsistent ways people deal with it, the ups and downs of life after loss, and the moments of joy and loving bonds that find their way through anyway. Timed right over high school graduation, it's also about growing up, moving away, and how fast and intense things happen when you're eighteen. And it's about how when you think you're coping, there are moments that hit you. The moment when Serena walks into the living room to find her dad sobbing over a baby picture of her brother is heartbreaking--the image is so stark and simple that before you know it, you've had the briefest, smallest glimpse into the heart of man who's lost his firstborn child, and it hurts a lot. The emotions in general ring very true. Teenagers are up one minute, down the next, and people recovering from trauma can be as well. The hurt and anger are very real, very stark, and the way they coexist with the giddiness of young love and having close friends is very real too. The soundtrack really brings out the 80s-film-ness; by the dance competition when somebody puts on Alphaville, you can totally picture it in your head--and when the Evil Homophobic Dance Judge is thwarted by the Surprisingly Nice MeanGirl holding a boom box over her head blasting Pat Benatar, the trope is pretty much complete. But honestly, I /love/ those movies.

A gay story directed at young adults - that's still a rare thing I guess. I'm glad that some authors think about young people when they write - maybe the next generation will be more accepting and sensitive:)
Marelyne
First off, whoa. I hope you're ready for an emotional ride with this book. It packs a punch that will leave you breathless, giddy, and full of hope.

If I wasn't already fairly close to my siblings, this book would have me reaching out to them in a heartbeat. In fact, even though we are close, I almost put the book down to go hang out with them.

Serena is a high school senior who, before the start of the book, loses her brother to a hate crime. He is brutally murdered and left in the gutter because he's gay. At the start of the book, Serena knows virtually nothing about who he was, and her parents are stuck in a catatonic state.

Through a series of events that can only be described as fate, Serena befriends hot boy Brodie and they meet Lance. Because of these meetings, Serena starts to learn more about the brother she had, and wishes more than anything she could have him back to talk to him.

My heart broke throughout the book for Serena and her family. Seeing her suffering from the loss was painful, but at the same time, watching the love of Brodie and Lance unfold through her eyes was beautiful. I could feel how intense it was by the words the author uses to describe their looks, their movements, and every other last detail.

Secrets are revealed throught the book, and I won't ruin them here, but let's just say I stayed up very late to finish it. I just couldn't go to sleep without knowing what happened. In the end, Serena finds the courage to confront her brother's killer with the help of her brother's best friend, boyfriend, and her mother.

Also, the ending scenes with The Showdown? I would pay seriously good money to see this as a movie because of that scene. Barnes chose the PERFECT song for the dance sequence, and it was running through my head throughout it. So beautiful.

Do yourself a favor. Get this book. Read it. And then go hang out with your siblings and get to know who they REALLY are.
Vizuru
It's "love at first sight" for loner high school senior Brody Wiles meets Lance Royal, who is preparing to enter a local dancing competition. There as a witness is the high school paper's conscientious but socially-stunted editor, Serena Albright, who is especially attuned to the needs of gay teens, since her brother - who was never completely accepted by her parents or her after he came out to them - was the fatal victim of a hate crime. Serena makes it her mission to help Brody find happiness, the same way she wishes she would have been better attuned to her brother's needs. At the same time, she is working through the guilt she has for failing to have done so, and dealing with her parents, who have become emotional cripples since their son's death, failing to deal with their grief and move on. Like Serena, her parents find themselves involved in helping Brody after he comes out to his own parents, and decides to join Lance as his dance partner in the competition. At the same time, Serena and her parents have to deal with a request from the individual who is in prison for killing her brother.

The book is set in the late 1980's, but still relevant to the plight of many gay teens today. The author presents a vivid and realistic telling of the emotions and unfortunate realities that can face a teenager in reconciling his sexuality, as well as the confrontations this can cause with others. Very well written, meant for a younger audience, but a valuable read for all. Four stars out of five.

- Bob Lind, Echo Magazine
Utchanat
I bought this book for my fifteen year old daughter as soon as it was available. She has had nothing to say but great things about the book. She said she loved the story and the characters. She is typically very picky about what she reads but has informed me that she has now read it three times since it was given to her. She greatly anticipates David-Matthew Barne's next book and keeps asking when it will be available.