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eBook Rescue: The Story of How Gentiles Saved Jews in the Holocaust download

by Milton Meltzer

eBook Rescue: The Story of How Gentiles Saved Jews in the Holocaust download ISBN: 0060242094
Author: Milton Meltzer
Publisher: Harpercollins Childrens Books; 1st edition (August 1, 1988)
Language: English
Pages: 168
ePub: 1984 kb
Fb2: 1700 kb
Rating: 4.8
Other formats: mbr rtf docx lrf
Category: Teenager
Subcategory: Education and Reference

The author, Milton Meltzer, writes the story of the Gentiles in an intriguing way. He gives the reader informative stories about many different Gentiles who assisted the Jews during the Holocaust

The author, Milton Meltzer, writes the story of the Gentiles in an intriguing way. He gives the reader informative stories about many different Gentiles who assisted the Jews during the Holocaust. He also makes connections between different places and periods of time when the Holocaust was taking place. For example, Adolf Eichman, a German Nazi bureaucrat, is described in a few places throughout the book. First, his background is explained, and then later in the book, some of the horrible things he planned for the Jews.

This book tells of how the gentiles saved the Jews in Europe. To tell the truth, I began this book rather ignorant about the Holocaust. I liked this book for the many different stories it told, each more daring then the next. This book doesn't really have a plot, it is more of a collection of stories I recommend this book people who like the facts more than a story. Personally, I found this book to be very interesting. One thing it lacked was a storyline though. I have read such books as The Hiding Place and Zvi, but am far from having a full understanding of what brought about the Holocaust, how Hitler rose to power, and what happened then. For me, this book was perfect.

Historian Milton Meltzer was born in Worcester, Massachusetts in 1915. During World War II, he served as an air traffic controller in the Army Air Corps. He attended Columbia University, but had to leave during his senior year because of the Great Depression. He got a job writing for the WPA Federal Theater Project. After the war, he worked as a writer for CBS radio and in public relations for Pfizer. In 1956, he published his first book A Pictorial History of the Negro American, which was co-written by Langston Hughes.

Here are their stories: thrilling, terrifying, and most of all, inspiring. For in the horror that was the Holocaust, some human decency could still shine through. It is an inspiring testimonial. The San Francisco Examiner-Chronicle. A companion to Never to Forget, this is the story of those gentiles who sought to rescue their Jewish neighbors from annihilation during World War II. Succeeding chapters describe the efforts of Germans, Poles, Danes, and others to save Jewish friends and strangers from the.

The two books by Meltzer most widely held in WorldCat participating libraries are Never to Forget: the Jews of the Holocaust (1976) and Rescue: the story of how gentiles saved Jews in the Holocaust (1988).

A companion to Never to Forget, this is the story of those Gentiles who sought to rescue their Jewish neighbors from . An ALA Best Book for Young Adults.

A companion to Never to Forget, this is the story of those Gentiles who sought to rescue their Jewish neighbors from annihilation during WWII. A story that needs telling". Between the years 1933 and 1945, Adolf Hitler organized the murder of six million Jews while the world looked on silently. But not all people stood back in fear. In every Nazi-occupied country, at every level of society, there were non-Jews who had the courage to resist.

Milton Meltzer presents some remarkable stories of how Righteous Gentiles risked imprisonment and even death to save Jews from Nazi persecution. The book also provides some basic background information about the Holocaust. While Meltzer recounts the stories of some famous rescuers, such as Raoul Wallenberg, King Christian X of Denmark and Oskar Schindler, he also tells of ordinary people who made a difference and became heroes because they acted courageously and did not tolerate Nazi hatred. Recommended for junior high school students. Assignment: Rescue by Varian Fry.

Rescue the novel written by Milton Meltzer is a touching story of how many brave gentiles tried to save the lives of those who were looked . Rescue: The Gentiles Who Saved Jews in the Holocaust, is a wonderful book.

Rescue the novel written by Milton Meltzer is a touching story of how many brave gentiles tried to save the lives of those who were looked down apon, such as the Jews during the Holocaust. Many of the gentiles took the Jews into their homes, at risk they may too be caught. A must read about the Holocaust. com User, January 4, 2002. It tells in almost firsthand experince how the Gentiles saved some of the Jews and why. 0. Report.

A recounting drawn from historic source material of the many individual acts of heroism performed by righteous gentiles who sought to thwart the extermination of the Jews during the Holocaust.
Comments: (7)
Spilberg
Being Jewish, myself I thought I knew a lot about the Holocaust. I knew quite a bit but was surprised at what I didn't know!!! A friend of mine had a battered copy he loaned me. The clear substance of the book was amazing. You almost could put yourself inside the book. It's heartwarming, horrible and amazing how one man, Hitler was able to turn most people in Germany against the Jews! You'll have to buy the book to find out more. I bought one for myself and one for my friend to replace his battered copy. It's not a book you love, you love it because of the truth it tells you about.
Opithris
This book is heartwarming. I wished everyone would read books like this to understand how awful the Holocaust was. Most people have no idea what went on, but after you read this book, you will know some of the horrors the Nazi's did to people.
Yozshugore
An excellent resource for my classroom.
Lailace
I know a little about the Holocaust but have not studied it extensively, and this book seemed to be written for me.

Outlined geographically and flowing smoothly from chapter to chapter, Rescue looks at at groups and individuals who helped Jews, and comments on the philosophies behind each person's choices. Each chapter has a simple map at the beginning, and Meltzer ties each event to the next with comments like: "In the village of Le Chambon all the people came together to save the lives of thousands of Jews. In the country of Denmark another spectacular act of human solidarity took place." This makes the book easy to understand.

While it does speak about Hitler's purposes and some of the horrific acts perpetrated on the Jews, as necessitated by the story, Rescue's focus is on the good, so that the evil is easier to handle.

A few of the exciting things this book unintentionally brought out is that God can use anybody, regardless of character or culture, to protect His people; that God is working even in the worst of circumstances; and that, while humans are fallen (thus the Holocaust happened in the first place) we are still made in the image of God and know to do right.
Isha
The biography, Rescue: The Story of How Gentiles Saved Jews in the Holocaust by Milton Meltzer, reflects on the people and events that are not usually thought of with the topic of the Holocaust. In the book, the Gentiles prove to be convincing heroes because they go out of their way and risk their lives to help others, which they are taught to hate. This book is a worthwhile read because the heroic deeds of the Gentiles are well explained, and the author sparks the interest of the reader to learn more about each Gentile's story.
The Gentiles are heroes because they go above and beyond what is expected in everyday life. They protected the Jews because they believe it is the right thing to do, regardless of what they are taught by the anti-Semitists. For example, a student, Marion Pritchard, witnesses the brutality by the Germans to Jewish children, while she is riding her bike down the road. This disturbing incident shocks her into wanting to do as much as she could to help them and stop this cruelty. "Crying with rage, she just sat there on her bicycle and at that moment decided she would do anything she could to stop such atrocities." (p.140). By choosing to do this, she puts herself in danger and alters the course of her life.
The author says that the Gentiles even help strangers; this is not an unusual characteristic of heroes since they tend to be selfless, and do not distinguish between the people they help. In Poland, a woman, Elizabeth Przewlocka, grabs a Jewish boy before he is about to be deported. She hid him until she could find an orphanage for him. "Elizabeth Przewlocka, snatched a Jewish child she didn't know while the Nazi guard wasn't looking." (p.32). The author gives several examples of this throughout the book. Milton Meltzer successfully paints a vivid picture of the activities taking place. This makes the reader feel like they are physically seeing the story unfold.
The author, Milton Meltzer, writes the story of the Gentiles in an intriguing way. He gives the reader informative stories about many different Gentiles who assisted the Jews during the Holocaust. He also makes connections between different places and periods of time when the Holocaust was taking place. For example, Adolf Eichman, a German Nazi bureaucrat, is described in a few places throughout the book. First, his background is explained, and then later in the book, some of the horrible things he planned for the Jews. These include in Budapest with his goals of destroying every Jew possible, and the deportation of families in Holland, like Anne Frank's. "Adolf Eichmann prepared a plan to round up the Jews in Budapest, the capital." (p.106), "Anne was sent to Auschwitz in the last deportation of Dutch Jews organized by Eichmann." (p. 134). Also, the book and its events are connected, even from chapter to chapter, so that all the stories flow smoothly. For example, chapter six is about Le Chambon and Andre Trocme, "That `dangerous, difficult Trocme,' as he had been called by his national church, had made goodness happen in Le Chambon." (p.87), and leads into the next chapter, which is about Denmark and Sweden, "In the village of Le Chambon all the people came together to save the lives of thousands of Jews. In the country of Denmark another spectacular act of human solidarity took place." (p.89). This makes the book easy to follow and understand. To get an even fuller understanding of where each of the rescues is taken place, there are maps at the beginning of each chapter. There is also an index in the back of the book to find specific events or people, which are mentioned throughout the biography. Milton Meltzer leaves readers with questions to think about, "Would I, could I, we wonder, stand up for the persecuted and the helpless? Would I risk so much? Would I care that much?". (p.156).
This book is a must read because it gives a different view of the Holocaust, from the heroic people who help rather than the ruthless ones who kill. The book is particularly suitable for people with little knowledge of the Holocaust. It is written for people with interest in the Holocaust, but without emphasize on the gruesome details. This biography shows that there are many ways in which people show their heroism.