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eBook Into the Labyrinth download

by Roderick Townley

eBook Into the Labyrinth download ISBN: 0689837461
Author: Roderick Townley
Publisher: Gardners Books (August 31, 2004)
Language: English
Pages: 224
ePub: 1636 kb
Fb2: 1467 kb
Rating: 4.5
Other formats: doc txt lrf mbr
Category: Teenager

This sequel, Into the Labyrinth by Roderick Townley, explores the special challenges and unimaginable threats . Townley provides enough background to help readers unfamiliar with the first book while not distracting from his story.

This sequel, Into the Labyrinth by Roderick Townley, explores the special challenges and unimaginable threats faced by the characters when they are uploaded onto the World Wide Web. Ages 10-up.

This sequel, Into the Labyrinth by Roderick Townley, explores the special challenges and unimaginable threats .

a book beloved from the first page. Its sequel,Into the Labyrinth, was hailed by theNew York Timesas "a hopping fine read. The present volume completes the Sylvie cycle. Mr. Townley has also published the novelSky, described by VOYA as "one hell of a book," as well as volumes of poetry, nonfiction, and literary criticism. He has two children, Jesse and Grace, and is married to author Wyatt Townley

Into the Labyrinth book. Another sweet yet simple book by Mr. Roderick Townley. This one, much like the first, also struck me as very multi-dimensional, perhaps even more-so.

Into the Labyrinth book. This one made the leap to virtual reality, along with its usual realms of reality, consciousness, subconsciousness, and the dreamscape. Also as usual, the author very much left a lot of the imagination up to the reader.

Behind Every Stack Of Books, There Is A Flood Of Knowledge (Awesome painting) Does anyone know . Jeremiah’s art is full of imaginations and could take me into a whimsy fantasy world

Jeremiah’s art is full of imaginations and could take me into a whimsy fantasy world. I am pinning it because I love reading and the steps are made of books! Jeremiah Morelli aka is a German middle school teacher and digital artist focusing on fantasy-themed illustration. Love this picture! And I love books. With books I have traveled the world - I've spent time in Antarctica - I've climbed mountains and dived the oceans. I can't imagine a world without the wonder of books!

A deliciously quirky tale of secrets, magic, and illusions. Roderic Townley spins a deliciously spooky tale of one girl's journey to discover what's real and what is simply an illusion.

A deliciously quirky tale of secrets, magic, and illusions. Everything is in place: the packed theater, the Amazing Thummel, and, center stage, the magician's mysterious assistant. Some have called her the most beautiful woman in Europe. Then, in a swirl of light, she vanishes! An astounding illusion, but she never reappears.

Into the Labyrinth (2002, Sylvie Cycle book 2), young adult fiction by Roderick Townley. This disambiguation page lists articles associated with the title Into the Labyrinth.

What a relief when the old storybook is republished and the characters who live inside it suddenly discover they have Readers again - lots of Readers - especially when the book is loaded on to the Web. The endless reading exhausts the characters - but that's nothing to the problems they face as strange things start happening. Words get changed around, scenes disappear - and Sylvie and her friends must launch themselves into the labyrinth of cyberspace to confront a twenty-first century evil that threatens to destroy their world.

by Roderick Townley · Omar Rayyan. The Great Good Thing (The Sylvie Cycle, by Roderick Townley. Sylvie had an amazing life, but she didn't get to live it very often. Sylvie has been a twelve-year-old princess for more than eighty years, ever since the book she lives in was first printed.

For those who have read or heard of Rick Riordan's "Battle of the Labyrinth", this is really different.

What a relief when the old storybook is republished and the characters who live inside it suddenly discover they have Readers again - lots of Readers - especially when the book is loaded on to the Web. The endless reading exhausts the characters - but that's nothing to the problems they face as strange things start happening. Words get changed around, scenes disappear - and Sylvie and her friends must launch themselves into the labyrinth of cyberspace to confront a twenty-first century evil that threatens to destroy their world.
Comments: (3)
Doomwarden
After reading and loving "A Great Good Thing," I was hoping for this sequel to be as well-written and charming. I was disappointed. It features the same wonderful characters, princess Sylvie and the "girl with the dark blue eyes," as well as the king and queen and all the other characters, but the plot doesn't hold together nearly as well. The author inserts a new character -- a yoga instructor named Rosetta-- into "the story" as an assistant shepherdess, and all the talk of energy projection lines and finding one's center is way above the heads of its 9-12 audience.
Instead of books and their readers, it tackles the problem of the Internet and its viewers -- that is, "the story" is published online. Instead of a little brother who is a pyromaniac and destroys the book in "A Great Good Thing," it seems to deal with a boy who spreads computer viruses -- but this part isn't very clear.
The story borders more on the zany type of puns and Alice-in Wonderland type plot, -- than than the clever, funny and fantastic but logical and believeable plot devices of the original. Characters from other stories wander into the text. Internet "cookies" look like lemon cookies, but are tasteless. Someone steals the "d's" in one paragraph. Entire lines of dialouge disappear, arrows become roses. Persumably all these thing happen due to a computer virus -- but there is no clear character behind or logical reason for the problems. The book suggests a little boy is to blame, but unlike the clear difficulties in the first book -- escaping a burning book and not being forgotten upon the death of the reader -- the villian is murky and there is not a logical direction to the problems. The mysterious villian is defeated eventually -- but you never do learn how or why the virus happened. And by the end of the book, you don't particulary care.
Lli
Although the first book, The Great Good Thing, may have been better in some ways, this was still quite a good book! All the same characters from the first book are here plus new people. The usual characters continue in their roles in this book and do more and more. In Into the Labyrinth, the Writer puts Sylvie's story on the Internet. That's when their story gets a virus.

Just as they start getting used to climbing down the page, instead of across as in a book, they find that for some strange reason letters go missing, and words get mixed up. When Sylvie learns what a virus is from a friend and finds a way outside of the story, she becomes determined to solve the problem.

Into the Labyrinth is a creative, imaginative book!
Insanity
First I must say Roderick Townley is a writing genius. However this is not his best work. In the first one he still doesn't make it completly understandable. In this one I think he isn't quite staying in the same place first one. I think he lose's topic a bit too much and tries to make it better than the first one. He fails in the attempt. I would recommend the book just don't expect a movie anytime soon.