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eBook Software Testing: The Basics of the Trade download

by Gaia Asher

eBook Software Testing: The Basics of the Trade download ISBN: 0977036405
Author: Gaia Asher
Publisher: Galiel.Net (September 1, 2005)
Language: English
Pages: 175
ePub: 1418 kb
Fb2: 1283 kb
Rating: 4.9
Other formats: azw lrf txt docx
Category: Technologies
Subcategory: Programming

Software Testing book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Software Testing: The Basics of the Trade as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Software Testing book.

The book teaches students how to properly utilize and interpret the results of the modern-day hacking tools . As mentioned in the title, this is a basics course. You learn the very basics of many tools that can set you on a solid path to a penetration testing career.

The book teaches students how to properly utilize and interpret the results of the modern-day hacking tools required to complete a penetration test. It provides a simple and clean explanation of how to effectively utilize these tools. If you are new to this field and looking to get a solid foundation on hacking and penetration testing then I would highly recommend this book.

Select Format: Paperback. ISBN13:9780977036400.

The list of top 10 best software testing books to learn manual and automation testing skills quickly from the experts. It has a special chapter that gives details of the functions of the designer as well as the testers and then gives the strategies for both

The list of top 10 best software testing books to learn manual and automation testing skills quickly from the experts. It has a special chapter that gives details of the functions of the designer as well as the testers and then gives the strategies for both.

Software testing jobs can also be performed remotely and some organizations may provide work from home options to. .

Software testing jobs can also be performed remotely and some organizations may provide work from home options to software testers. With the rise in the adoption of crowdsourced testing, crowdtesting, individuals also have an opportunity to freelance as a software tester and earn a side income. Software Testing Interview Questions. Some of the common software testing interview questions for freshers and those who are new to software testing are given below. Why do you want to become a software tester? What do you think, are good qualities that a software tester must have?

Day Trading and Swing Trading the Currency Market: Technical and Fundamental Strategies to Profit from Market moves, Kathy Lien. One of the best selling day trading books, you get to benefit from the experience of one of the most highly regarded analysts in the forex world. If you haven’t seen her on Bloomberg or CNN, then you’ll enjoy her to the point style. You’ll gain an insight into conducting accurate market analysis, plus the author’s a solid source of trade ideas.

Software testing is really about reducing risk. I just wanted to cover some of the basics here which you’ll hear about and see in everyday conversations as a software developer. Hey John, I’m a bit confused. The goal of testing software is not to find bugs or to make software better. Black-box testing sounds a whole lot like functional testing.

This Book covers below topics Importance of Software Testing Basics of Quality Assurance (QA) in Software Development . these are the some of the software testing books. there are various online sites for learning software testing://www.

This Book covers below topics Importance of Software Testing Basics of Quality Assurance (QA) in Software Development Explains below Terms used in Software Testing. o Software Development Life Cycle (SDLC) o Functional & Non-functional Testing o Testing methods (whitebox, blackbox and Greybox) o Testing levels (Unit Testing, Integration Testing, System testing, Regression testing, Alpha Testing, Beta testing) o Testing Artifacts (Test plan, Traceability.

Software Testing Basics. Software testing can be stated as the process of verifying and validating that a software or application is bug free, meets the technical requirements as guided by it’s design and development and meets the user requirements effectively and efficiently with handling all the exceptional and boundary cases. The process of software testing aims not only at finding faults in the existing software but also at finding measures to improve the software in terms of efficiency, accuracy and usability

In many companies, software testers are simply considered software developers with a lower pay. However, that’s not the case. While it is true that software testing involves a lot of programming, it also requires a significantly different mind set and skills. Let’s illustrate this with a story:

Dark Ages. First, the developer arrives at the site and starts to plan the castle. He thinks, “Let’s put it on top of that hill, it’s the highest and provides a good, defendable position. It will also border with a river and so the defenders will always have water. Walls? Five meters thick and enforced concrete should do the trick. Gates… steel, half a meter thick. Good.”

Then the test team arrives on horses in a full armor, and the test lead starts to look at the castle. His thoughts are a bit different, “Ok, the position is strong, cannot take it over with a direct attack. What about the tower? Ladders will not work, too tall… May be walls? Enforced concrete, five meters thick, cannot use a ram. No, no weakness here. Gates… hm-m-m… Steel, half a meter thick, cannot break through. By the way, did they lock them?”

This book is devoted to software testing as a trade, something that people do for a living. And the primary thing that separates the trade and the art is that you cannot limit yourself to a single technique, area, or dimension of your trade. Van Gogh could paint some of his pictures in blue. It was later called a “blue period” and these pictures are in the best museums of the world, because it was art. Software testers have to use all of the spectrum and keep in mind all the dimensions of software testing, because it’s their trade.

A complete up-to-date picture of the dimensions of software testing is what this book is about.

Is this book right for you?

From the author:

Got an interview for a software tester or software design engineer in test (SDET) position? Read this book and go for the kill.

Got a phone interview for a software tester or SDET position? Print the table of contents available on the publisher's site for free, and use it as a plan and reference. You'll be back ordering soon.

Got a software tester position? Read this book to keep it.

Got a software project to manage with the testing outsourced to India? Read this book to know whether they do it right or screw you and themselves over.

Have a test team in India to sell their services in the United States? Bulk orders are welcome.

Still in college? Do you take a course on software design and development? Do you have a test for it?

New to the software development? Fresh from college? Read this book to learn what you are missing (unless you read it in the college).

Have 20 years of experience in the software industry as I do? Know it all and observed software testing growing from Glen Myer's "The Art of Software Testing" to its modern state? Read this book anyway. You'll enjoy it a lot. And you'll be able to fully appreciate it.

Am I bragging? Yes. You would be too, if you wrote such a good book.

Who is this book for?

Software testers, developers, Computer Science and Information Technology students, software project managers.

Comments: (2)
Hasirri
Search for 'Steve Jobs,part 1' on the "tube"; Go to 07:46 to 07:60 for Walter Isaacson, Steve Jobs' biographer's CBS comment on Jobs technical skills, quote: "He didn't know how to write code or program a computer".

Hooray!!! What a relief to discover that Steve Jobs was another CEO who had to deal with the gap between management nous and argumentative handcoding gurus. And it appears that this thin book by Gaia Asher is just what entrepreneurs need to retake executive command of their production line. No more bowing and scraping to their the code gurus who,(not all)couldn't care less about keylines, PMS colour matching, type faces, aesthetic form and grace... and SECURITY. (No, usually just plop it in a frame and HTML the damn thing without even beta testing or code QA.) You see, even my programmers thought that beta testing was good enough for release to the client. Gosh.

Over the years,with the fazing out of reflective artwork made ready for the printers, and with the fazing in of graphics computer programs and hand-coding whiz kids, our executive team developed a solution to bridge the mindset "Gap" between constipated hand-coders and starry-eyed graphic designers... "Never the twain shall meet" we used to say. Our solution to designing a great product, interactive or print collateral, was for our Senior art director to sit down next to the hand coder and watch and direct every move made to get a valuable end result ready to go to press or onto the web. (Yes we develop e-commerce websites too for a brandname airline, beers, as well as some national sports teams and venues, etc.)

Now, after reading Ms. Asher's eye-opening disclosures and funny explanations of Cyber security...without having to stare at pages of code examples, I can talk to my hand coders without bowing and offering my first-born to get clean results. Apparently Jobs had to shout and scream to get what he wanted. But now, thanks to Ms Asher, I know what they are saying and doing. In fact, her enthusiasm ignited my interest so that I am now half way through a C# course and enjoying every bit of it. No hiding from the boss this time.
Camper
I was reviewing this book to see if it would be something worth advising my employees to read. I was looking for something short and to the point that would cover briefly cover all aspects of Test Engineering without offering opinions into which methods work and don't work. The only part of the book you really get to read in the 10 page preview is the introduction, the author makes it a point to tell you that he is writing a book free of opinions & gets to the heart of what Test Engineering really is.

This is why I decided to give the book a shot, unfortunately the author is unable to keep to his own goal. Right from the start he is trying to convince you that his book is worth reading, explaining why other books are no good &/or not worth the money. He continues this kind of attitude through at least the end of chapter 2 (for that is as far as I was able to read). He bashed on the programming skills of people from foreign countries and pretty much bashes on anyone who isn't him.
This book is a complete waste of time & I would advise anyone wanting to learn about Test Engineering to look elsewhere. There is nothing to learn here except how to have a poor attitude which is not a skill anyone hoping to find a job want to have.