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eBook C++ The Core Language: A Foundation for C Programmers (Nutshell Handbooks) download

by Doug Brown,Gregory Satir

eBook C++ The Core Language: A Foundation for C Programmers (Nutshell Handbooks) download ISBN: 156592116X
Author: Doug Brown,Gregory Satir
Publisher: O'Reilly & Associates; 1st edition (October 29, 1995)
Language: English
Pages: 234
ePub: 1768 kb
Fb2: 1850 kb
Rating: 4.2
Other formats: mbr azw lrf doc
Category: Technologies
Subcategory: Programming

This is an excellent book for C programmers coming to C++ for the first time.

We'd rather spend twice the time on making one book the industry's best. This is an excellent book for C programmers coming to C++ for the first time. I found the writing style and organisation of topics to be very good.

by Doug Brown & Gregory Satir. 81 MB·25,640 Downloads·New!. At a time when energy costs are high, this important handbook expertly guides those seeking optimum use.

It covers features common to all C++ compilers, including those on UNIX, WIndows, NT, DOS and Macs.

Doug Brown, Gregory Satir. C++ has crossed the Single Book Complexity Barrier

Doug Brown, Gregory Satir. C++ has crossed the Single Book Complexity Barrier. The individual features are not all that complex, but when put together in a program they interact in highly non-intuitive ways.

Finding books BookSee BookSee - Download books for free. Doug Brown, Gregory Satir.

The book includes sidebars that give overviews of advanced features not covered. Read full description. See details and exclusions.

Gregory Satir, Doug Brown. It covers features common to all C++ compilers, including those on UNIX, WIndows, NT, DOS and Macs.

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C++ is an object-oriented enhancement of the C programming language and is becoming the language of choice for serious software development.C++ has crossed the Single Book Complexity Barrier. The individual features are not all that complex, but when put together in a program they interact in highly non-intuitive ways. Many books discuss each of the features separately, giving readers the illusion that they understand the language. But when they try to program, they're in for a painful surprise (even people who already know C).C++: The Core Language is for C programmers transitioning to C++. It's designed to get readers up to speed quickly by covering an essential subset of the language.The subset consists of features without which it's just not C++, and a handful of others that make it a reasonably useful language. You can actually use this subset (using any compiler) to get familiar with the basics of the language.Once you really understand that much, it's time to do some programming and learn more from other books. After reading this book, you'll be far better equipped to get something useful out of a reference manual, a graphical user interface programming book, and maybe a book on the specific libraries you'll be using. (Take a look at our companion book, Practical C++ Programming.)C++: The Core Language includes sidebars that give overviews of all the advanced features not covered, so that readers know they exist and how they fit in. It covers features common to all C++ compilers, including those on UNIX, Windows NT, Windows, DOS, and Macintosh.Comparison: C++: The Core Language vs.Practical C++ ProgrammingO'Reilly's policy is not to publish two books on the same topic for the same audience. We'd rather spend twice the time on making one book the industry's best. So why do we have two C++ tutorials? Which one should you get?The answer is they're very different. Steve Oualline, author of the successful book Practical C Programming, came to us with the idea of doing a C++ edition. Thus was born Practical C++ Programming. It's a comprehensive tutorial to C++, starting from the ground up. It also covers the programming process, style, and other important real-world issues. By providing exercises and problems with answers, the book helps you make sure you understand before you move on.While that book was under development, we received the proposal forC++: The Core Language. Its innovative approach is to cover only a subset of the language -- the part that's most important to learn first -- and to assume readers already know C. The idea is that C++ is just too complicated to learn all at once. So, you learn the basics solidly from this short book, which prepares you to understand some of the 200+ other C++ books and to start programming.These two books are based on different philosophies and are for different audiences. But there is one way in which they work together. If you are a C programmer, we recommend you start with C++: The Core Language, then read about advanced topics and real-world problems in Practical C++ Programming.

Comments: (7)
godlike
After reading the excellent "Visual C++ Blue Book", I still felt a little ignorant about how the OOP works with C++. Though the "Visual C++ Blue Book" explained it well, OOP is such a 'core competency' or 'fundamental' I felt I needed a little extra understanding on these concepts of C++. This book did an excellent job of explaining the core concepts of OOP as it relates to C++. Since it is short, I didn't get bored with the endless yammering of many authors. It was quick, consice, and yet somehow managed to be extremely thurough. I highly recommend this book to anyone even though it recommends itself to C programmers moving to C++. I'm from VB, ASP and was able to grasp all of the concepts. Buy it, it will make you a better programmer.
Ustamya
As an undergrad and passionate dbl major, having read many books in C and C++, this book quickly became my friend. It's a good read for those breaking out of C to C++. This book helped me cope with the shock experienced while I was trying to learn ADTs, BSTs, splay trees, skip lists, multiway tries and extendable hashing in the high level programming courses where if you asked questions you'd look dumb. The information in this book made me feel contiguously good while sitting in class. It also served as another perspective and filled in the gaps that the professor and school text left out. Also, pick up Robert Sedgewick's Algorithms in C++ 3rd Edition, which is also a splendid read.
Enjoy helping computers understand people!
late-
Whitemaster
"C++ the Core Language" was written in the mid-90's but is still relevant today. It was the only text I could find to teach C++ to this 25 year "C" programmer. Don't try and use it if you don't already know "C" and its structures and unions. If you know "C", the book is straight forward and doesn't waist your time defining what an "int" is or how to write a loop.
Mojar
son loves it
Clandratha
This is an excellent book for C programmers coming to C++ for the first time. I found the writing style and organisation of topics to be very good. The authors describe key object-based and object-oriented concepts first using familiar C constructions and then extend those ideas into the C++ domain. The ease of transitioning from C structs to C++ classes was very good, as was the discussion of subtle points like the copy constructor. Almost all major C++ concepts are described, including inheritence, virtual functions, and even templates.
My only negative criticism is that the authors leave out some important C++ functionality from their view of the C++ "core." They only mention in passing the use of const, considered by many to be vital to good C++ design. Also, since this book was published in 1995, it does not discuss the C++ standard library, which was finalised in 1997. It is therefore missing a discussion of the very useful 'string' class, among many others. Readers should defininitely follow up on these topics.
Regardless of this missing information, this book will give C programmers a solid foundation for using C++.
Nirad
First and foremost you need to already know C in order to use this book. You need to be familiar with the entire language because the authors derive most of their examples by saying: "This is the concept, this is how you would do it in C (to see the basic mechanisms), and now here's how you do it in C++." This book does not hold your hand through this teaching though, they assume you know what you are doing and are following what they are talking about, which is okay by me. I personally don't like books that are really wordy and have alot of information I already know and so I waste my time and money on needless words. There needs to be more books like this one, just tell me the core concepts like what they do and why and the burden for learning and understanding them falls on me not the authors. One complaint that was echoed in an earlier review was the lack of disk I/O commands which are different enough in C++ to necessitate in me having to go to another book to look them up. How about an appendix or website or something like that, sure would be helpful. All in all, a very good book if you don't like all the B.S., fluff, and general page filling that you see on the bookshelves (aka. every book except O'Reily's).
Mr_KiLLaURa
This book is relatively short, but many people might see this as a good thing, since it is really intended to transition C programmers to the basics ("core") of C++. I believe it does a decent job of this, although there are some topics (such as const) that I think it should cover but, surprisingly, does not. I liked the comparisons between polymorphism in C and C++, and the explanation of virtual functions. The examples are pretty good. There is some great humor in the book, and some parts actually made me laugh out loud. Overall, I would suggest the book to any C programmer who wants to transition to C++. Get this as your first such transitional book, then once you understand the basics, move on to a more comprehensive intermediate level book.
I had 7+ years C++ programming experience and then spent 3+ years in Java, XML, and JScript so I needed a nice, brief book which covered the core aspects of C++. Since it is only a reference I give it 4 stars. However, that's as high as I go for references, so it is a top drawer book.
Why do I like this book? It is very readable and quickly covers the key features of C++. I like it because it has little sidebars for discussion of more advanced topics. Core C++ is a small book for programmers... no bloatation.
This book doesn't get into heavy generic programming or type programming (with tons of operator overloads, cast operators and so forth), it is actually a book meant to help C programmers come over to C++. So, if you are a language geek or a C++ monster... get a different book. This is for C programmers and slightly rusty C++ programmers.
I would also say this book would be useful to Java programmers coming over to C++, since Java In in a Nutshell claims Java is more like C than C++ (and this seems true by my experience).