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eBook Refactoring to Patterns download

by Joshua Kerievsky

eBook Refactoring to Patterns download ISBN: 0321213351
Author: Joshua Kerievsky
Publisher: Addison-Wesley Professional; 1 edition (August 15, 2004)
Language: English
Pages: 400
ePub: 1517 kb
Fb2: 1129 kb
Rating: 4.8
Other formats: doc txt lrf lit
Category: Technologies
Subcategory: Programming

With the highly anticipated Refactoring to Patterns, Joshua Kerievsky has changed our approach to design by forever uniting patterns with the evolutionary process of refactoring

With the highly anticipated Refactoring to Patterns, Joshua Kerievsky has changed our approach to design by forever uniting patterns with the evolutionary process of refactoring. This book introduces the theory and practice of pattern-directed refactorings: sequences of low-level refactorings that allow designers to safely move designs to, towards, or away from pattern implementations. Using code from real-world projects, Kerievsky documents the thinking and steps underlying over two dozen pattern-based design transformations

Refactoring to Patterns book.

Refactoring to Patterns book. With the highly anticipated " Refactoring to Patterns," Joshua Kerievsky has changed our approach to design by forever uniting In 1994, "Design Patterns" changed the landscape of object-oriented development by introducing classic solutions to recurring design problems. In 1999, "Refactoring" revolutionized design by introducing an effective process for improving code.

The author does a lot of references to "Refactoring" by Martin Fowler and to THE Design Patterns book (Gamma.

Author/s : Joshua Kerievsky Publisher : Addison Wesley Category : Design Patterns, UML, and Refactoring . That's what Joshua Kerievsky has managed to create with this book.

That's what Joshua Kerievsky has managed to create with this book. This book assumes that you already know about refactoring and even states clearly that this book is best read with Martin Fowler's "Refactoring" as a reference. With that prerequisite in mind, this text does an excellent job of introducing the process of using refactorings to fix code problems by introducing patterns into your design.

The baseline for all of the patterns (. the "wrong, or to-be-refactored state") is on master. Each pattern is in it's own folder.

com/xp/refactoring/). The baseline for all of the patterns (. Each of them is a separate Maven module. The solution, is on each branch, named similarly as the folder.

many a programmer picks up Design Patterns, gazes at a Structure diagram, and then begins coding. Many of us who program using TDD and continuous refactoring find that it helps us: Keep defect counts low Refactor without fear Produce simpler, better code Program without stress. The result is code that exactly mirrors the Structure diagram, instead of a pattern implementation that best matches the need at hand.

Details for this torrent. Refactoring To Patterns- Joshua Kerievsky v. 3. Type: Other E-books. Using code from real-world projects, Kerievsky documents the thinking and steps underlying over two dozen pattern-based design transformations. Along the way he offers insights into pattern differences and how to implement patterns in the simplest possible ways. Get this torrent Anonymous Download.

The form I am using in this work is nearly identical to the one used by Martin in his Refactoring book.

I’ve yet to write a formal introduction to this work. The form I am using in this work is nearly identical to the one used by Martin in his Refactoring book. I have added the following to this form:, Zero, one or two asterisks beside the name of every refactoring.

Refactoring to Patterns. Josh Kerievsky has been at the heart of this overlap. I first met him when he organized the successful patterns study groups in New York City. For several years now, I've been involved with advocating agile methods in general, and Extreme Programming in particular. These groups did a collaborative study of growing literature on design patterns. 199 Pages · 2003 · 767 KB · 718 Downloads ·English. I tried to make sense of the Four Books, until love arrived, and it all became a single syllable.

In 1994, DESIGN PATTERNS changed the landscape of object-oriented development by introducing classic Solutions to recurring design problems. In 1999, REFACTORING revolutionized design by introducing an effective process for improving code. With the highly-anticipated REFACTORING TO PATTERNS, Joshua Kerievsky has changed our approach to design by forever uniting patterns with the evolutionary process of refactoring. This book introduces the theory and practice of pattern-directed refactorings: sequences of low-level refactorings that allow designers to safely move designs to, towards, or away from pattern implementations. Using code from real-world projects, Kerievsky documents the thinking and steps underlying over two dozed pattern-based design transformations. Along the way he offers insights into pattern differences and how to implement patterns in the simplest possible ways.
Comments: (7)
TheFresh
The emergence of Design Patterns has certainly been one of the most important things that has ever happened to object-oriented programming. We are more likely to end up with much cleaner and more testable systems when using design patterns as they are based upon tried and tested formulas for solving common problems. In reality though, we're often faced with different challenges. We need to work on legacy systems that often contain a lot of poorly structured and untested code. In the real world we often know that patterns would help a lot to clean up that mess, but adding them to an existing system is ... hard.

This book attempts to show you how to cut through undergrowth of various code smells and how to patch the systems with appropriate patterns. The book contains a lot of bite-sized chapters, so it is okay to grab it for 15 minutes, read a bit and get back to it some time later. Each refactoring contains a theoretical part (explaining the symptoms of said smell and a suggested refactoring), a "mechanics" part (how to perform the refactoring) and a practical example.

As of 2016, I didn't find step-by-step mechanics very useful (but this book was written back in 2004 and modern IDEs we use nowadays were nowhere as smart as they are today), but reading the original (unrefactored) code and comparing it with the final one (refactored) is definitely worth it.
Ddilonyne
I have just finished this book. All i can tell is that this one clearly is the next book you should read after knowing basic pattern design.

there is only one thing i wish any pattern book should have is that "at the end of each chapter, the author should include the COMPLETE refactored code so we can spend less time to understand what is going on". That's why i won't give this one 5 stars because it makes us spending more neccessary time to understand what is going on.

anyway, if you have no knowledge about pattern, you will need to spend more time to understand this book. Whenever you start a new chapter, you need to go online to search for a better understanding of what the pattern is about before diving into each chapter. if not, you will get lost for sure if you just concentrate on the mechanics section. The mechanics section is just the steps helping you reach the final form of a pattern . So if you know the structure of the pattern already, it will help you understand the mechanics section a lot faster.
Haralem
I heard a lot of praise regarding this book, so I decided to buy it.

Overall it's a good book but I was kind of hoping for something more. The author does a lot of references to "Refactoring" by Martin Fowler and to THE Design Patterns book (Gamma ...). In my view this book is more like a "how to understand and utilize" those previous two books and might increase the understanding for when to apply design patterns and when to avoid it.

I'd say that the examples used in this book is very good and they certainly do feel like non-fabricated examples. The Author's reasoning to when and how to refactor code in the examples are well described and easy to follow.

I think that if you studied Design Patterns & Refactoring and had problems understanding when or how to utilize what you learned during those books, then this book might be something for you. This might also be interesting if you wonder how to (as the title suggest) refactor towards a pattern. However, I think that where this book fails is that in a lot of situations refactoring toward patterns is to overcomplicate a code base when there are much easier solutions at hand.

Finally I'd like to say that this is certainly a good book, however I wouldn't rate it as one of those "must read"-books.
I'd much rather recommend the following books:

Clean Code - Robert C. Martin
Refactoring - Martin Fowler
Design Patterns - 4 authors : Gamma ...
The Pragmatic Programmer - Andrew Hunt and David Thomas
Nuadabandis
Kerievsky has done it. He has started to pull together anti-patterns (a.k.a. "bad smells"), refactorings, and patterns into one unified study. All three work well individually. Together, they make a powerful combination.

This isn't as rigorously analytic as the original Design Patterns book. I fully expect more theory-oriented writers to follow the trail blazed here. Instead, Kerievsky gives worked examples, in great detail. At every point, he starts with a code sample drawn from real life, complex enough to be interesting. Then, step by step, he shows the incremental changes made to transition from it's problematic start to its pattern-based end point. Experienced programmers may find this plodding and repetitive. Beginners, however, often have a hard time planning incremental changes and executing them. The author takes care to keep the code in working order at each increment, showing a clear path through the forest of possibilities. Some readers may even trace the path backwards, giving another look at how each change moves toward the end state. The worked examples are the real strength of this text.

This is a book for the software maintainer. In other words, it addresses 90% or 99% of the work that real programmers do. Just about every other software text on the market assumes that the project just started - the disks are empty and the compiler shrink-wrap is on the floor. I admit, that kind of programming is the most fun. It's just not realistic, though. Most work is rework, the kind demonstrated here.

Another great feature of this book is what it lacks: dogmatic harangues about methodology. It even keeps a skeptical attitude towards patterns, since heavyweight design techniques aren't always right for lightweight problems. Kerievsky mentions agile-ism, but doesn't make it a part of the process. He does, however, take the continuous testing idea from the eXtremists and work that into the demonstrations. Bravo! Hardware designers may wonder what the fuss is about, since thorough testing has been part of their culture for years. It's a happy novelty in much of the software world, though, and deserves to become standard practice.

My only problem with this book is that there isn't more of it. For example, constructor chaining is a great idea. There are two kind of chain, though. He shows the increasing parameter list, where simpler constructors supply default values for the more ones with more parameters. It's also possible to chain in decreasing order, where each constructor processes one parameter and passes on the simplified list. (What's good for constructors, of course, is also good for other collections of related methods.)

The book's ideal reader understands an OO language, uses subclassing regularly, and knows something about design patterns. That reader, with enough patience to follow the examples, will learn a lot. More experienced developers won't need the step by step approach, but may benefit from seeing multiple refactorings working together to solve a complex problem. It has my highest recommendation for any developer who really thinks about design and redesign.

//wiredweird