carnevalemanfredonia.it
» » Linux Programmer's Reference

eBook Linux Programmer's Reference download

by Richard Petersen

eBook Linux Programmer's Reference download ISBN: 0072123559
Author: Richard Petersen
Publisher: McGraw-Hill Osborne Media; Subsequent edition (December 10, 1999)
Language: English
Pages: 443
ePub: 1187 kb
Fb2: 1566 kb
Rating: 4.6
Other formats: docx doc mbr azw
Category: Technologies
Subcategory: Operating Systems

Linux, Programmer's Reference book.

Linux, Programmer's Reference book. Details (if other): Cancel.

Written by Linux expert Richard Petersen, this book explains how to get up-and-running on Linux, use the desktops and shells .

Written by Linux expert Richard Petersen, this book explains how to get up-and-running on Linux, use the desktops and shells, manage applications, deploy servers, implement security measures, and handle system and network administration tasks. This is a must-have guide for all Linux users.

A LINUX expert offers an alphabetical reference of every major LINUX command, syntax, description and example. The book provides time-saving insight as to when a certain command is better used over another. BASH and TCSH are covered, along with the Z shell.

Compare similar products. Linux Programmer's Reference by Richard Petersen (Paperback, 1998).

item 5 Linux Programmer's Reference by Petersen, Richard Paperback Book The Cheap Fast -Linux Programmer's Reference by Petersen, Richard Paperback Book The Cheap Fast. item 6 Linux Programmer's Reference by Petersen, Richard Paperback Book The Cheap Fast -Linux Programmer's Reference by Petersen, Richard Paperback Book The Cheap Fast. Compare similar products.

Richard Petersen, MLIS, teaches Unix and C/C++ courses at the University of California at Berkeley.

Author is a recognized Linux expert-PC Magazine calls Peterson "an impressive technical writer. Contains alphabetical reference of every major Linux command, syntax, description, and example. Provides time-saving insight as to when a certain command is better used over another.

by Richard Petersen (Author). - Elizabeth Zinkann, Sys Admin Magazine, June 2000. ISBN-13: 978-0072123555.

Richard Petersen (author). Please provide me with your latest book news, views and details of Waterstones’ special offers. Linux: The Complete Reference written by Richard Petersen detailed in the below table. Linux: The Complete Reference written by Richard Petersen detailed in the below tabl. ame of the Book. Linux: The Complete Reference. Name of the Author(s). How to Download a Linux: The Complete Reference By Richard Petersen. Step-1 : Read the Book Name and author Name thoroughly.

Goalkicker - Programming Notes for Professionals books. Computer Vision: Algorithms and Applications - Richard Szeliski. Data Structures and Algorithms: Annotated Reference with Examples - G. Barnett and L. Del Tongo. Computer Vision: Models, Learning, and Inference - Simon .

A alphabetic guide to Linux commands, syntax, descriptions, and examples covers the BASH, TCSH, and Z shell Linux programming shells
Comments: (4)
Gio
OK
Mysterious Wrench
If you already know the basics of programming (or even a little more than that), you're looking at Linux and you're a little confused about how it all goes together, this book does a pretty good job of explaining things, and it seems to be a good reference.
Example - I knew there were 'a.out' systems and 'ELF' systems, but I was a little confused when my Red Hat box started spitting out files named 'a.out' - this book explains the situation.
Before you read this you'd want to know what a shell is, and that there are several kinds of shell, and so on. You'd want to have a fair grasp of C and programming fundamentals (the shared library examples dive straight in with function pointers for example). You would also need to know your way around a Unix system before coming near the book, it's not going to help you in that area. IMHO that's a good thing, it cuts straight to the chase with the content.
In style, the book is _very_ concise. You'll need to read each page a couple of times to get the juice out. Occasionally it's too concise - it covers RCS (revision control system) and the 'ci' and 'co' commands without ever noting that they stand for 'check-in' and 'check-out', a concept that surely makes RCS easier to understand.
The examples that run through the book generally seem well structured and are able to be typed in and run on your machine as you read.
Overall I found this to be useful - it cleared up a LOT of dumb questions that I had. I'd like to have seen more on scripting languages than the appendices listing commands in Perl and Tcl/Tk. If a solid chapter on scripting languages was there instead of the two appendices, this would be a great book. As it is, it's still good. Well written, concise and it covers the ground. It'll do me!
Xal
The title of this book isn't exacly clear as to what it contains as the text, title, and summary use 'programming' to refer to both C/C++ programming and scripting. It has a some sections on using gcc, gdb, and make, but the first 157 pages are a reference to unix CLI syntax and shell commands (like "Unix in a Nutshell"). It would probably be good for a programmer who has never worked with Unix before. I was hoping for more of a "Linux Programmers" reference that covered Linux-specific nuances, libraries and devices, rather than a "Linux for Programmers" that shows how to use a shell and what the command line arguments are for gcc, etc... I guess the bottom line is it's not about programming, it's about scripting and the basic Linux/Unix tools that a programmer would use.
Ericaz
Good reference.