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eBook Getting Started with Storm: Continuous Streaming Computation with Twitter's Cluster Technology download

by Gabriel Eisbruch,Dario Simonassi,Jonathan Leibiusky

eBook Getting Started with Storm: Continuous Streaming Computation with Twitter's Cluster Technology download ISBN: 1449324010
Author: Gabriel Eisbruch,Dario Simonassi,Jonathan Leibiusky
Publisher: O'Reilly Media; 1 edition (September 20, 2012)
Language: English
Pages: 106
ePub: 1852 kb
Fb2: 1402 kb
Rating: 4.7
Other formats: mbr docx rtf lrf
Category: Technologies
Subcategory: Networking and Cloud Computing

Dario has been working in software development for more than 10 years.

Dario has been working in software development for more than 10 years. Today, Dario is the Chief Architect of MercadoLibre (NASDAQ MELI) where he leads the architecture team.

Jonathan Leibiusky (Author), Gabriel Eisbruch (Author), Dario . Dario has been working in software development for more than 10 years.

Jonathan Leibiusky (Author), Gabriel Eisbruch (Author), Dario Simonassi (Author) & 0 more. ISBN-13: 978-1449324018. The perfect book for people who is "getting started" with the technology and look for concise material about it's common applications and several examples. Published on October 12, 2012.

item 3 Getting Started With Storm by Jonathan Leibiusky, Gabriel Eisbruch, Dario Si. .Gabriel is a computer science student and works as an Software Architect in Mercadolibre (NASDAQ MELI) since 2007.

This hands-on guide introduces you to Storm, a distributed, JVM-based system for processing streaming data. Through simple tutorials, sample Java code, and a complete real-world scenario, you'll learn how to build fast, fault-tolerant solutions that process results as soon as the data arrives. Discover how easy it is to set up Storm clusters for solving various problems, including continuous data computation, distributed remote procedure calls, and data stream processing.

Chapter 2 Getting Started. 5. Chapter 3 Topologies. He has developed and contributed to several new and existing open source projects, including "Jedis", which is being used actively by VMWare and SpringSource. In the last year he has specialized in big data analysis, implementing Mercadolibre's hadoop cluster.

By: Jonathan Leibiusky (Author), Gabriel Eisbruch (Author), Dario Simonassi (Author), Jonathan Leibiusky (Author), Gabriel Eisbruch (Author) Publisher: Oreilly . Getting Started With Storm.

By: Jonathan Leibiusky (Author), Gabriel Eisbruch (Author), Dario Simonassi (Author), Jonathan Leibiusky (Author), Gabriel Eisbruch (Author) Publisher: Oreilly & Associates Inc Released: 20 Sep 2012.

Getting Started with Storm book. Special thanks to Jonathan Leibiusky, Gabriel Eisbruch and Dario Simonassi. Thanks for your time and effort. A good start on Apache Storm, a distributed continuous stream computing framework. A 100 page book with brief description on almost all concepts with examples.

oceedings{SW, title {Getting Started with Storm - Continuous . with Twitter's Cluster Technology}, author {Jonathan Leibiusky and Gabriel Eisbruch and Dario Simonassi}, year {2012} }.

oceedings{SW, title {Getting Started with Storm - Continuous Streaming Computation with Twitter's Cluster Technology}, author {Jonathan Leibiusky and Gabriel Eisbruch and Dario Simonassi}, year {2012} }. Jonathan Leibiusky, Gabriel Eisbruch, Dario Simonassi.

For example: Getting Started with Storm by Jonathan Leibiusky, Gabriel Eisbruch, and Dario Simonassi (O’Reilly).

Printed in the United States of America. For example: Getting Started with Storm by Jonathan Leibiusky, Gabriel Eisbruch, and Dario Simonassi (O’Reilly).

Getting Started with Storm. Continuous Streaming Computation with Twitter's Cluster Technology. By Gabriel Eisbruch, Jonathan Leibiusky, Dario Simonassi. Publisher: O'Reilly Media. Release Date: September 2012. Where’s the cart? Now you can get everything with O'Reilly Online Learning.

Even as big data is turning the world upside down, the next phase of the revolution is already taking shape: real-time data analysis. This hands-on guide introduces you to Storm, a distributed, JVM-based system for processing streaming data. Through simple tutorials, sample Java code, and a complete real-world scenario, you’ll learn how to build fast, fault-tolerant solutions that process results as soon as the data arrives.

Discover how easy it is to set up Storm clusters for solving various problems, including continuous data computation, distributed remote procedure calls, and data stream processing.

Learn how to program Storm components: spouts for data input and bolts for data transformationDiscover how data is exchanged between spouts and bolts in a Storm topologyMake spouts fault-tolerant with several commonly used design strategiesExplore bolts—their life cycle, strategies for design, and ways to implement themScale your solution by defining each component’s level of parallelismStudy a real-time web analytics system built with Node.js, a Redis server, and a Storm topologyWrite spouts and bolts with non-JVM languages such as Python, Ruby, and Javascript
Comments: (7)
Shomeshet
During these times when many people who do not speak English as a native language must read technical books in English, it is very important that technical books in English be written well, so people who do not have a strong command of the English language will be able to read them easily. Since English *is* my native language, I had no problem getting through the book, but, if English were not my native language, it would have been difficult.

The book provides a brief overview of Storm. Unfortunately, it seems to be out-of-date or just plain wrong in many places. Storm is a rapidly evolving technology Perhaps, O'Reilly should be offering this book only in an online "preview" version until Storm stabilizes?
Brightcaster
This book could have been much shorter. If you'd take the code snippets out (which are the largest part of the book) you'd end up with an introductory tutorial suitable for a blog. But then, it's also outdated...
Narim
The little bit of worthwhile content is overshadowed by the (apparent) complete lack of editing of the text and code examples. Incomprehensible at times. Really disappointing. Sorry
Nirn
Right now it's the only book on Storm, but still, it should have in more depth analysis on some technical aspects of Storm rather than just dumping code on paper to demonstrate what Storm can do.

You can probably just read the Storm manual on github without missing much.
BroWelm
This very thin tome is an okay intro to Storm, and great on the general concepts like spouts and bolts. However, it is already out of date, as the 0.8.x releases have changed a lot. What we found most missing was help on architecting and tuning Storm apps.
Vozilkree
Sadly, the code is full of blatant language and typographical errors and already woefully out-dated.
Whitescar
Extraordinarily thin on content, and written for a version that was superseded months before publication. Still, much better than the online tutorial.
I bought the Kindle version in Jan 2013, and it's so outdated that it's just useless. Examples won't compile and latest things in Storm such as Trident aren't even mentioned (well - the book predates those). This is not what I expected from O'Reilly. You'd learn much more by simply reading the Storm wiki/documentation and watching Nathan Marz's presentation on YouTube.