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eBook Founders at Work download

by Jessica Livingston

eBook Founders at Work download ISBN: 0596101287
Author: Jessica Livingston
Publisher: Oreilly & Associates Inc; 1 edition (January 1, 2001)
Language: English
Pages: 304
ePub: 1240 kb
Fb2: 1400 kb
Rating: 4.7
Other formats: lit docx mobi doc
Category: Technologies
Subcategory: History and Culture

Jessica Livingston is a founding partner at Y Combinator, a seed-stage venture firm based in Cambridge . The book has the same interview format as Programmers at Work, this time mainly with web startup founders from the 1995-2005 period.

Jessica Livingston is a founding partner at Y Combinator, a seed-stage venture firm based in Cambridge, Massachusetts, and Mountain View, California. She was previously vice president of marketing at investment bank Adams Harkness. In addition to her work with startups at Y Combinator, she organizes Startup School (ww. tartupSchool. There is some overlap with similar individuals interviewed in Programmers at Work, such as Dan Bricklin, Steve Wozniak, and Mitch Kapor.

Jessica Livingston is one of the founding partners of the startup . Founders at Work (2007) is a revealing look at what went on in the early days of over 30 influential US startups.

Jessica Livingston is one of the founding partners of the startup accelerator Y Combinator, which has advised and invested in a number of successful startups including Dropbox and Airbnb. In 2015, she became a financial backer for OpenAI, a nonprofit dedicated to the responsible and safe development of artificial intelligence.

How wonderful it would be if you could know what all the gods of silicon valley went through when they were in their early stages. Founders at Work" is a collection of many short stories that give you an insight to the early stages of many successful entrepreneurs.

Founders at Work: Stories of Startups’ Early Days. Trademarked names may appear in this book. Distributed to the book trade worldwide by Springer-Verlag New York, In. 233 Spring Street, 6th Floor, New York, NY 10013.

57 quotes from Jessica Livingston: 'Over the years, I've learned that the first idea you have is irrelevant. It's just a catalyst for you to get started. Then you figure out what's wrong with it and you go through phases of denial, panic, regret. And then you finally have a better idea and the second idea is always the important one. ― Jessica Livingston, Founders at Work: Stories of Startups' Early Days. the less energy people expend on performance, the more they expend on appearances to compensate. Jessica Livingston, Founders at Work: Stories of Startups' Early Days.

ries-St./1590597141. Don't judge a book by its cover. 25,531,717 Views · 28 March. Bibliographic Information. Stories of Startups' Early Days. She has a bachelor's degree in English from Bucknell University in Lewisburg, Pennsylvania.

Founders at Work: Stories of Startups' Early Days is a collection of. .Read this book, and let the founders themselves tell you. show more.

Founders at Work: Stories of Startups' Early Days is a collection of interviews with founders of famous technology companies about what happened in the very earliest days. Format Paperback 488 pages. Jessica Livingston is a founding partner at Y Combinator, a seed-stage venture firm based in Cambridge, Massachusetts, and Mountain View, California.

Founders at Work: Stories of Startups' Early Days (2007) is a book written by Jessica Livingston composed of interviews she did with the founders of famous technology companies concerning what happened in their early years. Max Levchin - PayPal. Sabeer Bhatia - Hotmail. Steve Wozniak - Apple Computer. Dan Bricklin - Software Arts. Ray Ozzie - Iris Associates, Groove Networks. Evan Williams - Pyra Labs (Blogger.

Founders at Work recounts the early struggles for independence and acceptance of many of modern technology’s giants, through personal interviews that are at times hilarious, at times painful, and always inspiring. As human-interest stories they will interest the same audience that enjoys reading about the Google founders in PEOPLE magazine. These stories are exceptionally interesting, because they're about the early stages, when the founders were younger and inexperienced. Most readers know startup founders only as confident millionaires. As novices trying to find their way by trial and error, they're more human, and easier for the reader to identify with.

Comments: (7)
Mr_Mix
This book contains great interviews by an insightful and influential person. While I haven’t finished it yet, I am writing this review mostly to be able to add some product images. I was horrified by the quality of the printing of this book! Apress, the publisher, ought to be ashamed. I have uploaded images showing how poorly the printed word looks in the paperback edition. Note the awful dithering (fuzziness). None of the letters are crisp. It almost looks like a cheap photocopy on a bargain-basement laser printer.

I do not know if the hardcover edition has this problem or not.
Agalas
This is a wonderful collection of interviews of company founders and co-founders. Kudos to the author for asking good questions and kudos to the interviewees for their candid, fascinating, detailed answers.

What surprised me most was how down-to-earth and normal most of these successful people were. Only a couple of them seemed full of themselves. The rest, surprisingly, were just the opposite. Their stories about their startup days provided insights into their values, motivations, aspirations, points of view, work ethic; as well as their worries, fears, doubts, and concerns; plus their approach to making tough decisions and a recognition of their personal limitations and flaws. Their interview responses are full of insights into their decisions about business development, product development, product management, pricing, promotion, distribution, customer service, technical support, accounting, finance, hiring and technology choices; and dealing with venture capitalists, business partners and actual or potential competitors.

The interviews also provide a lot of insights into technology trends and market trends during the time that the founders' companies were starting up.

Here are the companies whose founders were interviewed, in the order they appear in the book: PayPal, Hotmail, Apple, Excite, Software Arts, Lotus Development, Iris Associates, Groove Networks, Pyra Labs (Blogger.com), Yahoo, Research in Motion, Marimba, Gmail, WebTV, TiVo, Viaweb, del.icio.us, ONELIST, Bloglines, Craigslist, Flickr, WAIS, InternetArchive, Alexa, Adobe Systems, Open Systems, Hummer Winblad, 37signals, ArsDigita, Fog Creek Software, TripAdvisor, HOT or NOT, Tickle, Firefox, Six Apart, Lycos, Aliant Computer Systems, Shareholder.com.

This book is perfect for anyone interested in entrepreneurship, technology startups, technology companies in general, and business books in general. I've read the book once already and now I'm in the middle of reading it a second time. I wish there were an audio version of it.
Jaiarton
I have only finished about a third of the book, and have already gotten my money's worth out of it. It is fascinating to see the vicissitudes of a project shape -- and be shaped by -- the business decisions.

The chapters covering Hotmail and PayPal showed some remarkable insight into how a given product can be marketed. Hotmail was a fairly straightforward shot from original idea to sales, (email from PIM DB is a fairly minor refinement technically -- it was huge from a business standpoint) but went through some massive changes in how that idea was sold. PayPal, on the other hand, went through profound shifts in the product itself, and also in marketing.

For me, insight into the founders' thought-processes as they rolled with the changes that they encountered was the primary value of the book. The author, then, is to be commended. Keeping the discussions of multiple interviewees relevant and picking out such insightful details is no mean feat. Every chapter so far has been excellent in these regards -- A further testament to her skills as an interviewer and editor.

If you are in or are considering going into a technical business, this book will help you understand the mind of those successful at that sort of thing. Most of the business advice I find is directed at the non-technical side of things, which is a very different sort of mind. That is what makes this book so particularly useful.
shustrik
The printing quality is appalling, I've never seen a professionally printed book that looked so bad. I have the "Coders at Work" book from the same publisher and it's 100x better, so I'm inclined to say that the copy I received is a second rate knockoff and not an official copy.

Cannot comment on content of the book because I literally cannot stand reading the blurry text.
Mildorah
Book was delivered as advertised. Now about the book. Well done by the author. The interviews were interesting and enlightening. If you're thinking about entrepreneurship you should read this book to get familiar with the possibilities, both the positives and the challenges. From the success arrived by detour to the success of following a dedicated plan. There's much to absorb and it's just plain interesting.
Wanenai
After reading the classic Programmers at Work (see below) back in the 1980s, then re-reading it again last year, I was a little disappointed with Founders at Work.

The book has the same interview format as Programmers at Work, this time mainly with web startup founders from the 1995-2005 period. There is some overlap with similar individuals interviewed in Programmers at Work, such as Dan Bricklin, Steve Wozniak, and Mitch Kapor. But mainly, you'll read about the guys and gals behind PayPal, Blogger, Yahoo, craigslist, Flickr, del.icio.us, etc. I was hoping for the same level of storytelling from the individuals interviewed--however, this time I found the stories to be flat, and uninteresting after awhile. This may just be an individual preference and bias, since many readers of this book won't have been influenced by Programmers at Work.

I would still suggest reading this one, but only after you've read Programmers at Work.