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eBook The Universal History of Computing: From the Abacus to the Quantum Computer download

by Georges Ifrah

eBook The Universal History of Computing: From the Abacus to the Quantum Computer download ISBN: 0471441473
Author: Georges Ifrah
Publisher: Wiley; 1 edition (January 10, 2002)
Language: English
Pages: 416
ePub: 1147 kb
Fb2: 1421 kb
Rating: 4.7
Other formats: lit docx txt lrf
Category: Technologies
Subcategory: History and Culture

PRAISE FOR GEORGES IFRAH’S The Universal History of Numbers. Ifrah’s book amazes and fascinates by the scope of its scholarship.

PRAISE FOR GEORGES IFRAH’S The Universal History of Numbers. Georges Ifrah is the man. This book, quite simply, rules. a mind-boggling and enriching experience. The Guardian (London). a fascinating journey taking us through many different cultures. It is nothing less than the history of the human race told through figures. –International Herald Tribune. Sure to transfix readers.

In this fun, engaging but no less learned book, he traces the development of computing from the invention of the abacus to the creation of the binary system three centuries ago to the incredible conceptual, scientific, and technical achievements that made the first modern computers possible.

Ifrah takes us In this brilliant follow-up to his landmark international bestseller, The Universal History of Numbers . This book is translated from Ifrah's original French to English by .

Ifrah takes us In this brilliant follow-up to his landmark international bestseller, The Universal History of Numbers, Georges Ifrah traces the development of computing from the invention of the abacus to the creation of the binary system three centuries ago to the incredible conceptual, scientific, and technical achievements that made the first modern computers possible. The translation is excellent, very readable, with many additional translator's notes inserted to provide useful or interesting background information.

Georges Ifrah, David Bellos, E. F. Harding, Sophie Wood, Ian Monk. Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them.

by Ifrah G. & et a. years to incorporate parallel development in quantum theory, self-organizing systems and complexity.

We can't help everyone, but everyone can help someone. 23 MB·28,952 Downloads·New! revision of the taxonomy of fields from that used in the 1995 rankings. Dietary Reference Intakes. 306 Pages·2001·886 KB·21,601 Downloads·New!

The Computer Book: From the Abacus to Artificial Intelligence, 250 Milestones in the History of Computer . If you have been looking for a more academic approach to the history of computing then this is the book for you. The book is divided into three parts

The Computer Book: From the Abacus to Artificial Intelligence, 250 Milestones in the History of Computer Science (Sterling Milestones). The book is divided into three parts. Part One contains a very comprehensive taxonomy/chronology showing the evolution of human number systems. Part Two is where you will find the core "History of Computing" bit: tables, logarithms, analogue/digital, mechanical calculators, automatic calculation, electronic machines etc.

A note on the von Neumann algebra underlying some universal compact quantum groups De Commer, Kenny, Banach Journal of Mathematical Analysis, 2009.

From the Abacus to the Quantum Computers, by Georges Ifrah, translated from French and with notes by E. Harding. A note on the von Neumann algebra underlying some universal compact quantum groups De Commer, Kenny, Banach Journal of Mathematical Analysis, 2009. The Quantum Sieve of Eratosthenes A, Sowa, Journal of Physical Mathematics, 2016.

Georges Ifrah (1947, 2019) is a French author and historian of mathematics, especially numerals. He was formerly a teacher of mathematics.

Former math teacher Georges Ifrah ha. .Read this book and you'll find out how the computer can be traced to the Renaissance, and how Word War II influenced the development of analytical calculation. The epic tale of computing comes to life in these pages.

Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them

Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read.

"A fascinating compendium of information about writingsystems–both for words and numbers."–Publishers Weekly

"A truly enlightening and fascinating study for themathematically oriented reader."–Booklist

"Well researched. . . . This book is a rich resource for thoseinvolved in researching the history of computers."–The Mathematics Teacher

In this brilliant follow-up to his landmark internationalbestseller, The Universal History of Numbers, Georges Ifrah tracesthe development of computing from the invention of the abacus tothe creation of the binary system three centuries ago to theincredible conceptual, scientific, and technical achievements thatmade the first modern computers possible. Ifrah takes us along ashe visits mathematicians, visionaries, philosophers, and scholarsfrom every corner of the world and every period of history. Welearn about the births of the pocket calculator, the addingmachine, the cash register, and even automata. We find out how theorigins of the computer can be found in the European Renaissance,along with how World War II influenced the development ofanalytical calculation. And we explore such hot topics as numericalcodes and the recent discovery of new kinds of number systems, suchas "surreal" numbers.

Adventurous and enthralling, The Universal History of Computingis an astonishing achievement that not only unravels the epic taleof computing, but also tells the compelling story of humanintelligence–and how much further we still have to go.

Comments: (6)
VAZGINO
The Universal History of Computing is the one book you should have if you want to follow the development of computers over the years. Some of the early technology surprised me as to what could be achieved a couple hundred years ago. Actually, I wanted a more concise glance at computer history. This book goes far beyond that.
Not-the-Same
if you're the kind of person who gains a lot from understanding how something came about, you'll love this. the first like 60 pages just depict different number systems over time...after that it get's prettycool i'm halfway donebut definitely like what im reading.mine arrived in good enough condition to give it a 5/5
GEL
Great, thanks!
Naktilar
This is simply a must read for anyone who is interested in numerical literacy!

Indispensable and should be required curriculum for anyone who teaches who wishes to think of themselves as versed in the arts and letters.
Gogul
I would have expected from the title that this book might have started in the 1940s (or at the earliest with Babbage and the Difference Engine) and told the story of the development of computers from there. No, as the subtitle indicates, this book goes way back. In fact, the first section is a summary of number systems going back to the age of the Egyptians and before. It's a very methodical and somewhat dry tale, not helped by being translated from the French by translators who feel compelled to insert their own comments at intervals.
When it does get going, it provides a history of the relevant mathematics as well as automata from the Islamic era forward. The actual computer era is touched on mostly in its early stages, with the first computers of the forties and fifties. And it concludes with about sixty pages that have nothing to do with history but rather attempt to define key words such as "information" and "computer."
All in all, it is a methodical and thorough book, perhaps a little dry but not as much as some books I have read. The author muses on the implications of various stages of discovery rather than simply relating the facts (and the translators chime in as well), which enlivens the story. Still, this book is probably for the more interested rather than the casual reader.
Winn
If you have been looking for a more academic approach to the history of computing then this is the book for you.

The book is divided into three parts. Part One contains a very comprehensive taxonomy/chronology showing the evolution of human number systems.

Part Two is where you will find the core "History of Computing" bit: tables, logarithms, analogue/digital, mechanical calculators, automatic calculation, electronic machines etc. It also includes an interleaved, and detailed, explanation of how computing has evolved from basic number crunching into abstract information processing.

Part Three reads like a long philosophical conclusion and contains some excellent material on ethics and artificial intelligence.