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eBook Play the Game: The Parent's Guide to Video Games download

by Luis Levy,Jeannie Novak

eBook Play the Game: The Parent's Guide to Video Games download ISBN: 1598633414
Author: Luis Levy,Jeannie Novak
Publisher: Course Technology PTR; 1 edition (August 10, 2007)
Language: English
Pages: 319
ePub: 1445 kb
Fb2: 1149 kb
Rating: 4.9
Other formats: mbr lit mobi txt
Category: Technologies
Subcategory: Games and Strategy Guides

Most books about video games that are aimed at parents pick a side

Most books about video games that are aimed at parents pick a side. Either video games are good for your child or they will warp your child forever. Not so with Play The Game. Play the game is the most balanced guide I've seen for parents. Play The Game is a fantastic guide book for parents who know nothing about video games, going over very basic things such as 'what's a controller' and 'what's it mean when my child says he's playing an "FPS"'.

Details (if other): Cancel. Thanks for telling us about the problem. Play the Game: The Parent's Guide to Video Games. by. Jeannie Novak, Luis Levy.

Most books about video games that are aimed at parents pick a side

Most books about video games that are aimed at parents pick a side.

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Przeczytaj go w aplikacji Książki Google Play na komputerze albo na urządzeniu z Androidem lub iOS. Pobierz, by czytać offline. Czytając książkę Play the Game: The Parent's Guide to Video Games, zaznaczaj tekst, dodawaj zakładki i rób notatki. Redefine the way you look at video games and how they relate to you and your children! "Play the Game: The Parent's Guide to Video Games" explores how electronic games can be used to strengthen communication between parents and children as well as revolut.

Finding books BookSee BookSee - Download books for free. 6 Mb. Game Development Essentials: Game Qa & Testing. Luis Levy, Jeannie Novak.

Play the Game: The Parents Guide to Video Games explores how electronic. Most books about video games that are aimed at parents pick a side.

GAME DEVELOPMENT ESSENTIALS: GAME TESTING & QA is the first book of its kind, preparing would-be testers for an exciting career in the game industry. Delamr Cengage Learning.

Play the Game : The Parent's Guide to Video Games. By (author) Jeannie Novak, By (author) Luis Levy. We can notify you when this item is back in stock. AbeBooks may have this title (opens in new window). Format Book 336 pages. Publisher COURSE TECHNOLOGY. Publication City/Country United States. Close X. Learn about new offers and get more deals by joining our newsletter.

Redefine the way you look at video games and how they relate to you and your children! "Play the Game: The Parents Guide to Video Games" explores how electronic games can be used to strengthen communication between parents and children as well as revolutionize the way we live. Written in an accessible style and language, Play the Game is perfect for any parent, from those who are unfamiliar with video games to those who are active gamers themselves. Through interviews and analysis with experts and families like yours, you'll discover how to use games to enhance parent-child and family relationships, for education, and as a career path. Provides parents with: -A comprehensive guide to the video games currently available on the market including ratings, genre, intended audience, and educational use -Tips, research, and advice from game developers, educators, psychologists, parents, and teens -Information on game development as a career, including examples of higher education programs and how to start building important skill-sets -A listing of useful additional references so that readers can continue to explore the role of video games in today's society Discover new ways to connect with your children through video games with "Play the Game!"
Comments: (5)
Andromathris
When it comes to parents and games, there is definitely a "disconnect;" it seems that there are two completely different cultures, that of the parents and that of the children. However, with the video game industry being over 35 years old now, it's worth noting that some of these parents were avid video game players back in the day. And while there are a lot of differences between the Pac-Man's and Defender's of yesterday and the nearly photo-realistic three dimensional games of today, there are also a lot of similarities. Furthermore, with a little bit of reference, it's possible to bring your knowledge of video games up to date. This is one of the things that Play The Game: The Parent's Guide to Video Games strives to do. I must admit that I hadn't expected that, but it makes perfect sense. Parents are used to talking to their children from an authoritative stance, which is hard to do when you have no clue what you're talking about. Play The Game can help with this by placing you on a more level playing field, if not giving you a bit of an leg up on the history of video games. Chapter One, "Where It All Begins," is devoted to delivering a crash-course in the history of video games, from "Tennis for Two," a game built using lab equipment and meant as a technology demonstration, to the advent of LAN parties, where a large number of computers are networked in order to play games.

Chapter Two, "Games 101," continues the history lesson with more recent history, specifically, the most recent consoles, from the PlayStation 2 to the Wii. This chapter provides an explanation of a lot of basics that have become foundations of console gaming, such as Analog sticks, D-pads and Shoulder buttons. Chapter Two also explains the various modern videogame genres, the rating system, the market for the different types of games and what benefits some games have to offer. (Benefits from playing videogames? Gasp!? Yes, benefits.)

Chapter Three, "You and Your Kids," is the point where Play The Game gets serious about its title and, having set the necessary infrastructure for understanding games, explores how parents and children can interact favorably and share the living room, as well as looking at different stages of development (specifically, Erik Erikson's stages of psychosocial development) and what games are appropriate for these stages. This chapter also looks at approaches to playing games if you've never played games before or if you haven't played since you were a kid, yourself. One interesting item explained in "You and Your Kids" is how, even when you're not playing, simply being in the room with your kids (when they're playing videogames) can help to open lines of communication, since children often communicate more freely when they're playing.

Chapter Four, "The Social Game," addresses issues with social interaction of local players (such as your family members) and also social interaction with others via the Internet in online games, including Massively Multiplayer Online games (or, "MMO"s). Topics such as dealing with competition and aggression are discussed, as well as relationships with other (remote) players. One thing I found to be quite nice was the "Best N00b Survival Practices" list. It offers some good suggestions for surviving you first (and most vulnerable) time in a MMO game. A short inset section called, "Basic FPS Vocabulary" explains four frequently used FPS terms, specifically, "Owned," "Camping," "Spawn Killing" and "Teabagging." And, of course, a book like this couldn't be complete without including Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs. Chapter Four also points out some of the useful aspects of the social anonymity provided by online games. Interesting stuff.

There are things to be learned by playing games. Actual, valuable lessons. Chapter Five, "Playing to Learn" discusses these. I am an advocate for games as learning tools, but Play the Game: The Parent's Guide to Video Games actually points out some that I hadn't previously considered. Some of these seem to be applying literary analysis techniques to video games, but then again, they seem to make valid points, even if these skills are learned without the players realizing it. Then again, I've heard that some videogame playing related skills, such as management skills from managing MMORPG guilds, should be included on resumes. Imagine.

In addition to being a great leisure activity and actually being able to teach people skills, there are real-life careers to be had in the video game development industry. Chapter Six, "Game Makers" and Chapter Seven, "Playing to Work," detail the history of this young industry and offer a glimpse at the tools of the trade and the positions that are involved in creating modern videogames, as well as pointing out the skills and education that are sought after for these positions. Chapter Seven has a particularly informative section on "Ports of Entry," or different ways to get into videogame development and how they compare with each other. This is a useful chapter for anyone interested in game development but unsure of their best approach into the industry.

The final chapter, "Know Your Game," is a summary chapter that recaps some lingo and covers some important hardware information that will help those unfamiliar with consoles to find their way around hooking up a console and preparing to play some games.

Initially, I thought the book was a bit far-reaching for its topic, but as I read and saw how everything would be useful to those who weren't familiar with the material already, it started to make sense. One particular aspect of Play The Game: The Parent's Guide to Video Games that will help the book to hit home with parents is the multitudes of "Parent Snapshot" inset sections. Several appear in each chapter of the book and provide observations and insights that actual parents have concerning playing games with their children. I believe that Play The Game: The Parent's Guide to Video Games goes a long way to closing the culture gap between today's gaming children and their parents. It provides useful information, new insight and testimonials that show how games can be a positive dynamic in your kids' lives and in your relationship with them.

Play The Game: The Parent's Guide to Video Games was written by Jeannie Novak, Lead Author and Series Editor of Thomson's Game Development Essentials series, and by Luis Levy, an engineer at Treyarch who overcame a learning difficulty involving his motor skills by playing videogames, at the suggestion of his mother. These two authors each bring knowledge and unique experiences which help to make this book a good read. I highly suggest it for any parents out there who want to have a better idea of what videogames are all about or want to use videogames as a tool to increase the quantity and quality of their communication with their children.

By: Robert Perkins AKA Geck0 - original review can be found at [...]
Negal
Play The Game is geared towards college students and helping them brush up on gaming knowledge in preparation for the course ahead. This book is great for that as well as many other uses. It doubles as both a great study tool and a great read for parents to get in touch with their children who are gamers, looking to work in the industry or even to bond with their children on the same level.

Play The Game goes very in depth as far as details regarding games and genre's as well as all the existing and previous console generations. It's broken down to simplicity for anyone to understand and appreciate. For college students it tells how the industry works, from young gamers to older gamers and how the games are made and what kind of time and effort goes into it.

The book even goes into detail regarding High Definition and Standard Definition TV displays. This is a must have for any college student looking to become something in the industry as well as parents or even for gamers who enjoy a little coffee table read.
Fenius
Most books about video games that are aimed at parents pick a side. Either video games are good for your child or they will warp your child forever. Not so with Play The Game. Play the game is the most balanced guide I've seen for parents.

Play The Game is a fantastic guide book for parents who know nothing about video games, going over very basic things such as 'what's a controller' and 'what's it mean when my child says he's playing an "FPS"'. Simultaneously it also makes a excellent reference book for parents who play games themselves, offering insights into how to maximize your play time with your child.

Play The Game's strength lies in not judging video games. The book seems to accept that games can be either a positive or negative force in a child's life and really focuses on helping parents ensure that games are positive for their child and their family.

James Portnow
Next-Gen
Llbery
A lot of parents remember the 'the old school' of gaming, even if they don't play any now. This book has some good examples of similarities between the 'then and now' and how things are different as well. It has some great references on how games today can be a small area where we can connect with our children even if we are not gamers our selves. As well as some information about the games that are attracting our kids today.
Bolv
For parents who are looking to understand what their kids are up to this is a great book. Gaming isn't just for pasty faced kids in their parents' basement. Games can help educate and develop social skills. This book does a nice job of showing the wide ranging implications that games can have on kids. For parents who feel intimated by the latest and greatest consoles, this book does a nice job of explaining concepts clearly and evenly. If you used to play games back in the Atari 2600 days and then took a break this book will get you caught up in no time. If you are student, like myself interested in gaming this book can be a valuable resource for its extensive history.

A definite add to your library.