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eBook When Things Start to Think download

by Neil Gershenfeld

eBook When Things Start to Think download ISBN: 0805058745
Author: Neil Gershenfeld
Publisher: Henry Holt and Co.; 1st edition (January 12, 1999)
Language: English
Pages: 225
ePub: 1597 kb
Fb2: 1747 kb
Rating: 4.4
Other formats: azw lrf mbr doc
Category: Technologies
Subcategory: Computer Science

Neil Gershenfeld, director of MIT's Media Lab, joins the ranks of rs with When Things Start to Think, and his focus is on how the future of computing will fit into our physical realities.

Neil Gershenfeld, director of MIT's Media Lab, joins the ranks of rs with When Things Start to Think, and his focus is on how the future of computing will fit into our physical realities. This sensorial focus allows Gershenfeld to explore such science fictional ideas as wearable computers, nanotech circuitry implants, as well as such concerns as emotions, money, and civil rights in the new age of artificial intelligence

Neil Gershenfeld covers a variety of topics, ranging from the evolution of computing, to the MIT Media . When DESIGNERS Start To Think: This isn't a book about "things" starting to think, or even computers starting to think.

Even when he gripes about the shortcomings of these fields, his message remains simple: we've come a long way, When Things Start to Think was published in 1999, but is still a thought-provoking and entertaining read over a decade later.

This is a book for people who want to know what the future is going to look like and for people who want to know how to create the future.

We live in a world of increasingly intrusive information technology, requiring that people meet the needs of machines rather than the other way around. In When Things Start to Think, Neil Gershenfeld explains why this has happened and how to fix i. This book presents a compelling vision of what the world will be like tomorrow, based on technology in the laboratory today

When Things Start to Think.

Gershenfeld directs the Center for Bits and Atoms at. the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, which gets support. from the National Science Foundation. When Things Start to Think.

Neil Gershenfeld In this lecture, Gershenfeld discusses ""From Bits to Atoms" Prof

Neil Gershenfeld In this lecture, Gershenfeld discusses ""From Bits to Atoms" Prof.

Neil Gershenfeld, director of MIT's Media Lab, joins the ranks of rs with When Things Start . When I first read the book, I was astonished at how intuitive everything was - well explained, well thought out, and extremely well written

Neil Gershenfeld, director of MIT's Media Lab, joins the ranks of rs with When Things Start to Think, and hi. .When I first read the book, I was astonished at how intuitive everything was - well explained, well thought out, and extremely well written And it will be for your children. how education should be. Published by Thriftbooks. com User, 19 years ago.

Neil Gershenfeld, P. is an associate professor at MIT, the director of the Media Lab's Physics and Media Group, and codirector of the Things that Think consortium. Gershenfeld has written for Wired and for other technology publications, and he lives in Boston.

Neil Gershenfeld as keynote speaker at APMM 2010. In 1998, Gershenfeld started a class at MIT called "How to make (almost) anything". Neil A. Gershenfeld (2000). Henry Holt and Company. ISBN 978-0-8050-5880-2. However, this class attracted a lot of students from various backgrounds: artists, architects, designers, students without any technical background.

This is a book for people who want to know what the future is going to look like and for people who want to know how to create the future. Gershenfeld offers a glimpse at the brave new post-computerized world, where microchips work for us instead of against us. He argues that we waste the potential of the microchip when we confine it to a box on our desk: the real electronic revolution will come when computers have all but disappeared into the walls around us. Imagine a digital book that looks like a traditional book printed on paper and is pleasant to read in bed but has all the mutability of a screen display. How about a personal fabricator that can organize digitized atoms into anything you want, or a musical keyboard that can be woven into a denim jacket? Gershenfeld tells the story of his Things that Think group at MIT's Media Lab, the group of innovative scientists and researchers dedicated to integrating digital technology into the fabric of our lives.
Comments: (7)
Villo
This book written at the turn of the millennium represent the jumpstart of IoT. Many great prediction that ended up becoming reality and some less ones. Overall a great source of inspiration and a great trigger for deeper thoughts on the utility and implications in the upcoming realm of pervasive connected device.s
INvait
An excellent book for the layperson to understand where computing is headed and where the lines between life sciences and technology blur. Gershenfeld makes it easy to understand how our lives will be affected by the incredible advances we are making in all fields of science. This book belongs on the shelf right along side Kurzweil, Norman and Metcalfe. It will round out our comprehension of the future, both near and farther out on the horizon. I learned about PEM three-dimensional printers and how they will help us model our ideas. I learned about the all too easy use of buzzwords such as "fuzzy logic" to confuse the public into thinking something "new" is happening. I learned a great new definition for religion-"Beliefs about our existence that are not falsifiable have a central place in human experience-they're called religion." And I learned about a great place for students of all backgrounds to work together for fun and maybe even profit-the Media labs at MIT. And I found an answer to a question that has long been bothering me. "Marvin Minsky believes that the study of artificial intelligence failed to live up to its promise, not because of any lack of intelligence in the programs or the programmers, but because of the limited life experience of a computer that can't see, or hear, or move." Anyone with even a hint of questions about the future and what it might hold for us should pick up this book. It is marvelous reading, despite the weight of the subject matter!
Jeronashe
The author of this book is clearly of the opinion that the "Digital Revolution" is more of what he calls a 'disinformation campaign'. His arguments are to the effect that computers and gadgets need to be responsive to human needs, this not being the case to this date. Computers should be a suit of clothes a person can wear (literally!!) and not a straightjacket, the author seems to say. We should expect more from computers, and the Digital Revolution should be for people, not computers.
The author is definitely correct in saying this, as computers are still difficult to use for most people. The author's book is an attempt to propose remedies for this state of affairs, and some of these are highly creative, making the book very interesting to read. Some of the more clever ideas include smart paper, wearable computers, and smart money. He also overviews more exotic notions of computation, such as DNA and quantum computation. These ideas and developments are all very exciting, and no doubt most of them will come about....and soon.
Malojurus
Gershenfeld admits that this book is incomplete. Unless you can be satisfied with an explanation of quantum physics that is a few sentences long, this book is definitely not the be-all and end-all. It might be worth your while just to skip this text and look into his other books "The Nature of Mathematical Modeling" and "The Physics of Information Technology" (I have yet to read these) if you are truly interested in this subject.

On the other hand, I fear for those who may be left satisfied with this book. Gershenfeld seems to think that we can allow machines to think for us. My fear lies in the consequences when (not if) these machines break down. For example, we in the firefighting industry call the lights that indicate the water level in a fire engine "idiot lights" because you are an idiot if you rely on them. Any self-respecting pump operator knows these detection systems fail and that they should be able to calculate water levels for themselves. If we are to rely on the more complicated systems he suggests, it follows that it will be increasingly difficult to compensate for them when they break down. Just look at what happens when cell phones, PC's, and networks break down today.

Gershenfeld should follow this book with "When Things Become Dumb."
Morlurne
Neil never disappoints with his visions of the future. This book was written in 2000 and many of the topics discussed have came to fruition or are on the verge
White_Nigga
Yes,the future is now!
Shem
The style of writing and the author's extraneous comments about left field topics was off putting. I wonder whether folks who liked it simply ignored its shortcomings.
It's hard to provide a real expectation with a book like this. It's touching a very interesting subject and yet, it cannot really go in full technical details on how to do it. My personal expectations on this book were about looking at technology by hard technology fan rather than money-driven projects or from consultants.
This book, though a bit of simple light read, will show current and upcoming technologies in a raw science form; why & simple how those master scientists are creating outstanding technology by first having fun and at looking at simple problems.
Want to get a feel about the possible next eBook? It will explain how this could happen. Want to see what a computer chip in your shoe could give to you? You will read the why.
It was a delight to see that there are masterminds behind the annoying fact that computers are dumb. too dumb. The potential to make them live and help the humanity is there and When Things Start to Think is trying to convey that is a simple & easy read for a broad audience.