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eBook The Player download

by Boris Becker

eBook The Player download ISBN: 0552151858
Author: Boris Becker
Publisher: Corgi Adult; New Ed edition (June 1, 2005)
Language: English
Pages: 329
ePub: 1250 kb
Fb2: 1723 kb
Rating: 4.1
Other formats: mobi txt lit mbr
Category: Sports
Subcategory: Racket Sports

Boris Franz Becker (German pronunciation: ; born 22 November 1967) is a German former world No. 1 professional tennis player. He was successful from the start of his career, winning the first of his six major singles titles at age 1. .

Boris Franz Becker (German pronunciation: ; born 22 November 1967) is a German former world No. He was successful from the start of his career, winning the first of his six major singles titles at age 17. His Grand Slam singles titles included three Wimbledons, two Australian Opens and one US Open. He also won five year-end championships, 13 Masters Series titles and an Olympic gold medal in doubles

Boris Becker shot to fame in 1985 when at seventeen years old, he became the youngest player ever to win the men's final at Wimbledon

Boris Becker shot to fame in 1985 when at seventeen years old, he became the youngest player ever to win the men's final at Wimbledon. He went on to win two more Wimbledon titles, and a total of forty-nine singles and fifteen doubles crowns, making him one of the greatest players of the twentieth century. But his life off the court has always attracted as much attention as his triumphs on i. ow, in this remarkably candid and thought-provoking autobiography, Boris Becker tells the real story behind the headlines.

The Player Boris Becker. 16 people like this topic. Want to like this Page?

The Player Boris Becker.

Boris Becker shot to fame in 1985 when at seventeen years old, he became the youngest player ever to win the men's final at Wimbledon.

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Profile page for No team player Boris Becker. Boris Becker previous match for No team was against Eintracht Trier in DFB Pokal, and the match ended with result 0 - 2(Freiburg won the match).

Boris Becker shot to fame in 1985 when at seventeen years old, he became the . Please provide me with your latest book news, views and details of Waterstones’ special offers.

Boris Becker's Wimbledon

Boris Becker's Wimbledon. Boris Becker and Chris Bower.

Boris Becker shot to fame in 1985 when, at 17, he became the youngest player ever to win the men’s final at Wimbledon. He went on to win two more Wimbledon titles, and a total of 49 singles and 15 doubles crowns, making him one of the greatest players of the 20th century. But his personal life always attracted as much attention as his professional triumphs. Now, in this remarkably candid autobiography, Boris Becker tells the real story behind the headlines. He talks about his marriage, his daughter, and his painful divorce. He talks about how he felt at the end of his tennis career and his battles with pills and alcohol. He also shares his memories of the good times, the championship wins, and the make-or-break matches.
Comments: (7)
Meztisho
This autobiogtaphy seems more directed towards a German audience. Boris' recollection of his first Wimbledon title at age 17 is noteworthy; however, his narrative about the rest of his life jumps aroumd too much.
Appatently, he had contentious breakups with coaches, a bitter divorce and a run in with German tax authorities.
It reads as his side of dated gossip articles in the German press.
In the end, book is vapid and unfulfilling.
Exellent
Boris Becker is the epitome of an attacking tennis player bursting onto the grounds of Wimbledon at 17. He really was the transitional player who, with Stefan Edberg, ended the Ivan Lendl dominance bridging the gap to the Agassi/Sampras generation. But instead of being a superb athlete, Boris was a deep thinker with many other goals in his life and this book reflects as much on his complicated personal life as it does his tennis career. You could say that Boris was almost embarrassed or bored with his tennis career. He understood that life was so much more, intellectually and personally.

If regular life were only so simple. Of course not all of the public will get a hostess pregnant on a "chance" one-time meeting. Complications ensue capped by his income tax evasion trial. Through this Becker maintains his dignity although somewhat bruised.

Becker is a complicated man and this book does a great job of portraying the true Becker. If you want a tennis book only, read Patrick McEnroe's new book or step back to Pete Sampras' book. This is more about knowing and understanding the unique and talented Mr. Becker.
spacebreeze
I would've preferred to give three and a half stars but nvm, well worth a read if you're a fan, I always wanted to hear his own point of view.

It doesn't appear to be too ghost written and though the tennis is featured, it's not just about tennis, and that's inevitable. We all know Becker's physical tennis style - it was often the things happening off the court that threatened his place in the game and could well have distracted him. It's obvious that Boris has had many highs and lows, very early fame and success that he struggled to deal with, as he was suddenly thrust into the public eye. He overcame that to sustain a long and illustrious tennis career at a time the game was undergoing some key transitions which he describes well - the context of someone who witnessed and was at the middle of the change of a tennis era.

If there is anyone who bridged those two eras, it was Becker. Despite his serve dominant game, he was always entertaining to watch. And he makes a good point - at a time when most sports are being dogged and threatened by drug scandals and cheating, tennis remains a relatively untainted, predominantly skill based game, equal parts mental, emotional and physical. The main cloud over it at present is the increased commercialism and exploitation of the sport. Fair enough - professional top players deserve remuneration but at what point does it become more about the money than the game?

Boris is a contradiction - swinging between tightly controlled discipline, and extreme passion/drama; self assuredness and then self doubt/loathing. It is those shades that made him an interesting player and individual. His feelings towards his homeland veer from pride, affection and sentiment; to some disappointment, frustration and bitterness.

His accounts of meeting other great, legendary figures - sporting and political - leave a lasting impression and have obviously helped put priorities and his own position in perspective for Becker. As did fatherhood.

We watched him transform from boy wunderkind of Germany, forced to represent a nations hopes and pride, to becoming a grown man in his own right with family and business responsibilities. Flawed but surviving when others may have been broken by the pressure. It is sad that his marriage to Barbara became a casualty and ended so messily, but that's life that intrudes - the book was written some time ago however and I think that since then both have been able to move on. Becker is now on the sidelines of tennis but it's cool too see him involving himself once again, through coaching and commentary - all the best to him.
Conjulhala
Very interesting life. I am not a tennis fan. I like to read autobiographies/biographies of people I know nothing about. The biography I read before this one was of Clementine Churchill. There is a trend with movie star biographies. Their lives are interesting up until they become famous. Then all they do is work.
Gelgen
While we watched this champion burst upon the scene, pursue his career with dogged determination and eventually bow out on tennis' greatest stage it was easy to forget he was a young man growing up in full public glare. We know all about the tennis but next to nothing about the boy wonder who grew into a man. A fantastic account from the horse's mouth which an intriguing layer to the man we knew as Boom Boom Becker!
heart of sky
I was excited to read this since I watched Boris play back in the late 80's. I lost interest in the book quickly due to his writing and life style. Reading about Andre Agassi was MUCH more interesting and a quick read.
Mavegar
This book is a good read. This is how an autobiography for a sportsperson should be written - AFTER he/she retires. Most people just write it in the middle of their careers and leaves the story ...well half finished. Boris does provide some honest insight into his life in this book more than his sport which is an interesting choice as one would expect sports to dominate most of the content. Every boom - boom fan should get hold of this one to get to know his life through his eyes first hand. Highly recommended.
A very interesting book, giving an inside look in the world of a top athlete, who became rich and famous almost overnight. Boris shares his views on the world of sports and other side of normal human life (social inequality, racism, love, etc.). A great read!