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by Edward Whymper

eBook Scrambles Among the Alps in the Years 1860-69 download ISBN: 0486289729
Author: Edward Whymper
Publisher: Dover Publications; 5th ed. edition (May 14, 1996)
Language: English
Pages: 512
ePub: 1898 kb
Fb2: 1357 kb
Rating: 4.6
Other formats: mbr azw lrf docx
Category: Sports
Subcategory: Mountaineering

Whymper wrote several books on mountaineering, including Scrambles Amongst the Alps

Whymper wrote several books on mountaineering, including Scrambles Amongst the Alps. That year he also made the first crossing of the Moming Pass.

Scrambles Amongst the Alps is one the great classics (some would say the greatest) of early mountaineering literature, and Edward Whymper (1840-1911) one of the leading figures of the early years of Alpine climbing

Scrambles Amongst the Alps is one the great classics (some would say the greatest) of early mountaineering literature, and Edward Whymper (1840-1911) one of the leading figures of the early years of Alpine climbing. He is best known, of course, for his many attempts on the Matterhorn, and for the loss of four members of his climbing party after the successful first ascent of the peak in July, 1865. Although the Matterhorn stands in ways in the center of his book, there are descriptions of many other ascents as well, in the Alps of France and Italy, as well as those of Switzerland.

Whymper details his Alps climbs in the 1860s with many first ascents including Mont Pelvoux in 1861, Barre des .

Whymper details his Alps climbs in the 1860s with many first ascents including Mont Pelvoux in 1861, Barre des Écrins in 1864, Mont Dolent and Aiguille d'Argentière in 1864, and Grand Cornier, Pointe Whymper on the Grandes Jorasses, and Aiguille Verte in 1865. But Whymper will always be remembered for the first ascent of the Matterhorn on July 14, 1865. Something about his style of writing makes one feel they have not only read a delightful tale, they have actually incorporated it into their own memory.

Whymper's book about some of his first ascents of peaks in the Alps, including the first ascent of the famed Matterhorn alternates between really fascinating and dry.

Пользовательский отзыв - amerynth - LibraryThing. Whymper's book about some of his first ascents of peaks in the Alps, including the first ascent of the famed Matterhorn alternates between really fascinating and dry. His curmudgeonly character. Стр. 83. 174. 262.

When Whymper first arrived in the region in 1860, he had only a literary acquaintance with mountain-climbing. Throughout the book, Whymper brings to life the joys he experienced in his scrambles, and he concludes that in the end, these pleasures couldn’t be effaced. He took to it at once, returning often to make many first ascents. Nonetheless, he writes, there have been griefs upon which I have not dared to dwell; and with these in mind I say, Climb if you will, but remember that courage and strength are nought without prudence, and that a momentary negligence may destroy the happiness of a lifetime.

The book written by Edward Whymper, a famous illustrator, writer, explorer and climber, is a real discovery for those readers who love nature and especially mountains. The author focuses not only th. .English history of mountaineering in the Victorian epoch, but also on the beauty of the mountainous regions and the possible risks in mountaineering. Edward Whymper is known as the first who has conquered Matterhorn so his impressions about his ascend are especially valuable. In his description other peaks of the Andes and the Alps with their fascinating beauty are included

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On the 23d of July 1860, I started for my first tour in the Alps. As we steamed out into the Channel, Beachy Head came into view, and recalled a scramble of many years ago.

carousel previous carousel next. The Ascent of the Matterhorn. Isabella L. (Isabella Lucy) Bird. On the 23d of July 1860, I started for my first tour in the Alps. With the impudence of ignorance, my brother and I, schoolboys both, had tried to scale that great chalk cliff.

First conqueror of Matterhorn describes early mountain climbing, excitement and danger of climbing the high peaks — violent storms, falling rocks, frigid temperatures, glorious alpine scenery, and the thrill of conquest.
Comments: (7)
Berenn
I read this as historical research but quickly fell in love with it as a work of literature. There's a lot of first-we-did-this and then-we-did-that, but when Whymper moves away from chronological reporting, he shows himself to be one hell of a good writer. His conquest of the Matterhorn and the tragedy that quickly followed give the book its emotional core. If you like adventure stories, I don't know how you don't love this.
THOMAS
Mountaineering classic! A great documentary on climbing technique and gear of old. Whymper's wonderful humor and incredible enthusiasm for the mountains permeate.
Heraly
As a mountain and alpine hiker this was a great book written by someone who did it all back when climbing didn't have any of the tech gear that makes it easier today. Especially the stories of summiting the Matterhorn. Been to Zermatt several times and the awesomeness of that mountain never disappoints!
Haal
This is a great book whether you are an armchair mountaineer or an avid climber. It is a classic of the genre by a pioneer of the craft. There's some humble bragging in the text that is a common thread(note title), but overall a great read. It will be a keeper on my bookshelf.
Xarcondre
A classic travel diary for everyone that finds pleasure in "the Alps", you can travel in the footsteps of Whymper and feel his presence among these fascinating mountains. Obligatory for every mountain man
Varshav
As advertised
Gozragore
Originally Published in 1871. Whymper details his Alps climbs in the 1860s with many first ascents including Mont Pelvoux in 1861, Barre des Écrins in 1864, Mont Dolent and Aiguille d'Argentière in 1864, and Grand Cornier, Pointe Whymper on the Grandes Jorasses, and Aiguille Verte in 1865. But Whymper will always be remembered for the first ascent of the Matterhorn on July 14, 1865.

The Matterhorn was considered to be mountaineering's biggest challenge at the time, and Whymper met with failure again and again. Finally on his eighth attempt he finally succeeded, becoming the first man to reach the summit on July 14, 1865.

On the descent, tragedy struck when four members of the party slipped and were killed, and only the breaking of the rope saved Whymper and the two remaining guides from the same fate. A controversy ensued as to whether the rope had actually been cut, but a formal investigation could not find any proof.

The accident haunted Whymper: "Every night, do you understand, I see my comrades of the Matterhorn slipping on their backs, their arms outstretched, one after the other, in perfect order at equal distances - Croz the guide, first, then Hadow, then Hudson, and lastly Douglas. Yes, I shall always see them."

I thoroughly enjoyed the parts of the book dedicated to climbing and was struck by Whymper's adventurous spirit, and his dedication and perseverance. The book does drag on a bit in a few parts with chapters on the technical details about glaciers and railway tracks. The 130 illustrations, many woodcut by Whymper himself, bring the story to life, and are almost as good as photographs.
Since I first read this little classic, Edward Whymper's book on scrambling in the Alps has always been my favorite mountaineering book. Something about his style of writing makes one feel they have not only read a delightful tale, they have actually incorporated it into their own memory. His pencil etchings are so evocative, you can almost smell the brisk air of Zermatt and feel the weathered texture of the Swiss dwelling. You can once again experience the thoughts of trepidation and anticipation which accompany a good outing in the mountains. This is Victorian mountain writing at its very best, in an age before high technology and polarfleece added safety and comfort but put some palpable distance between you and the experience and blunted the directness of your perceptions and observations. I've spent many of my own happy hours scrambling in the Alps, but somehow Whymper makes it seem like I'm doing it anew. Sure, it's always interesting to read of the difficulties of Everest or the tales of hardship on Half Dome, but Whymper was among the first, and high technology and modern photography have not allowed us to better put you into the heart of the experience.