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eBook The John Lardner Reader: A Press Box Legend's Classic Sportswriting download

by Dan Jenkins,John Lardner

eBook The John Lardner Reader: A Press Box Legend's Classic Sportswriting download ISBN: 0803230478
Author: Dan Jenkins,John Lardner
Publisher: Bison Books; 1 edition (October 1, 2010)
Language: English
Pages: 304
ePub: 1485 kb
Fb2: 1718 kb
Rating: 4.4
Other formats: mbr doc rtf lrf
Category: Sports
Subcategory: Miscellaneous

The John Lardner Reader book. This collection marks the return to print of John Lardner, one of America’s press box giants, a classic stylist whose wry humor and tireless reporting helped elevate sportswriting to art.

The John Lardner Reader book. The brilliant W. C. Heinz called Lardner the best of us. This book shows why.

by Dan Jenkins, John Lardner, John Schulian. This collection marks the return to print of John Lardner, one of America's press box giants, a classic stylist whose wry humor and tireless reporting helped elevate sportswriting to art. Heinz called Lardner "the best of u. Lardner applied his singular touch not only to his era's icons-Joe Louis, Ted Williams, Satchel Paige-but to the scamps, eccentrics, hustlers, and con men in the shadow of sports.

Home Browse Books Book details, The John Lardner Reader: A Press Box Legend's. The John Lardner Reader: A Press Box Legend's Classic Sportswriting. By John Lardner, John Schulian. Who but John Lardner could have written this lead in 1954? Stanley Ketchel was twenty-four years old when he was fatally shot in the back by the common-law husband of the lady who was cooking his breakfast. Slit my wrist was what this aspiring young typist wanted to do when I read that, thinking I could never come close to being that good - might as well look for a job in janitorial services.

The John Lardner Reader: A Press Box Legend's Classic Sportswriting. Additional Information. Published by: University of Nebraska Press.

Personal Name: Lardner, John, 1912-1960. by by Cheikh Anta Diop ; introd. by John Herrik Clarke ; afterword by James G. Spady. ISBN: 0883780496 Author: Diop, Cheikh Anta. Publication, Distribution, et. Lincoln ; London. University of Nebraska Press, (c)2010. Publication & Distribution: Chicago.

This collection marks the return to print of John Lardner, one of America’s press box giants, a classic stylist .

This collection marks the return to print of John Lardner, one of America’s press box giants, a classic stylist whose wry humor and tireless reporting helped elevate sportswriting to art. Lardner applied his singular touch not only to his era’s icons-Joe Louis, Ted Williams, Satchel Paige-but to the scamps, eccentrics, hustlers, and con men in the shadow of sports.

John Lardner (sports writer). Another friend, cartoonist Walt Kelly, designed the jacket and wrote a preface. 1912-05-04)May 4, 1912 Chicago, Illinois, United States. Some of Lardner's work was collected into a 2010 book, The John Lardner Reader: A Press Box Legend's Classic Sportswriting, by sports writer John Schulian Personal life. Lardner, the first son of Ring Lardner and his wife Ellis, was born in Chicago, where his father was writing for the Chicago Examiner.

This collection marks the return to print of John Lardner, one of America's press box giants, a classic stylist whose wry humor and tireless reporting helped elevate sportswriting to art.

The John Lardner Reader. A Press Box Legend's Classic Sportswriting

The John Lardner Reader. A Press Box Legend's Classic Sportswriting. Dan Jenkins is the author of Jenkins at the Majors: 60 Years of the World’s Best Golf Writing, from Hogan to Tiger.

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This collection marks the return to print of John Lardner, one of America’s press box giants, a classic stylist whose wry humor and tireless reporting helped elevate sportswriting to art. The brilliant W. C. Heinz called Lardner “the best of us.” This book shows why. Lardner applied his singular touch not only to his era’s icons—Joe Louis, Ted Williams, Satchel Paige—but to the scamps, eccentrics, hustlers, and con men in the shadow of sports. Whether in snappy columns or leisurely magazine pieces, Lardner held sport of every description up to the light, forever changing the way people wrote, read, and thought about their heroes, from superstars to scrappers. These forty-nine pieces represent sportswriting at the top of its game.
Comments: (7)
Molace
Like several other noted sportswriters this paperback includes several of the classic columns of John Lardner, the son of Ring Lardner who covered sports in the early decades of the 20th century. Both baseball and boxing are heavily featured in the book with a rather entertaining piece on gambler Titanic Thomson who I had previously never heard of. For anyone with aspirations to be a sports writer I would suggest they read books such as this to learn the various styles that writers have to entertain and inform their readers. This book, The John Lardner Reader, would be a must to include in their studies. I only wish it were available in hard cover.
Uste
Ask many of today's sports writers to recommend writers to study to understand the sports writing craft and one name will continue to appear. In this superb collection, John Schulian has compiled John Lardner's best work in a single edition. If you are not familiar with this son of RIng Lardner, prepare yourself for a fun ride. If you are like me, someone who spent hours reading old copies of Newsweek in college libraries to enjoy the world of John Lardner this is a welcome volume. If you do not believe me, then read the forward by Dan Jenkins judge for yourself why writers treasure the work of John Lardner.
Ballazan
A master for us all in the news world........

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FailCrew
Exhibit A in proving what a genius John Lardner was.
Ungall
A Very Good But Not Great Compilation. This is mostly a mixture of baseball, golf, and boxing stories. I favor his baseball stories more as I can relate to what he writes. Unfortunately, much of his writing is almost based on the fact his readers are in on the same joke as he is. A lot of it is topical that many of us today will just nod about and think, "okay, if you say so."

I favor his war correspondence over his sports writing. Much of his reporting on WWII is memorable and makes one feel as if he is there with Lardner. This is still a worthy sampling of Lardner's output.
Nilasida
I used to read J. Lardner in his Newsweek days and recognized him then as the greatest sports writer with whom I was familiar. Many of these columns are among his best work, but others are not. The selection is spotty, but average Lardner is still superior, and you'll enjoy this anthology.
Blackbrand
classic stuff from a sportswriting legend