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eBook A Significant Other: Riding the Centenary Tour de France with Lance Armstrong download

by Matt Rendell

eBook A Significant Other: Riding the Centenary Tour de France with Lance Armstrong download ISBN: 0297847163
Author: Matt Rendell
Publisher: Weidenfeld & Nicolson (August 1, 2004)
Language: English
Pages: 256
ePub: 1589 kb
Fb2: 1595 kb
Rating: 4.8
Other formats: azw mbr txt rtf
Category: Sports
Subcategory: Individual Sports

Lance Armstrong's place in the cycling history books is assured I have a great deal of respect for Matt Rendell as a journalist, but his writing in "A Significant Other" disappointed me. The book lurches rather awkwardly between Victor Hugo Pena's.

Lance Armstrong's place in the cycling history books is assured. Winner of the Tour de France a record-breaking six times, he is regarded as one of the greatest individual talents the sport has ever seen. Perhaps his most compelling victory was in 2003 when he won the coveted Centenary race. It's an appealing concept that's badly delivered.

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In 2003 Lance Armstrong won the Centenary Tour de France. Matt Rendell has written for television documentaries, contributed to television sports coverage for the BBC, ITV and Channel 4, including the British coverage of the Tour de France. It was his fifth victory and has cemented his position as one of the greatest cyclists of all time. This is the story of the 2003 Tour through the eyes of Lance's right-hand rider, the Colombian Victor Hugh Pena. He currently writes for Procycling magazine. Country of Publication.

May be you will be interested in other books by Matt Rendell: A Significant Other: Riding the Centenary Tour . Lance Armstrong's place in the cycling history books is assured.

May be you will be interested in other books by Matt Rendell: A Significant Other: Riding the Centenary Tour de France with Lance Armstrong by Matt Rendell. newSpecify the genre of the book on their own. Author: Matt Rendell. Title: A Significant Other: Riding the Centenary Tour de France with Lance Armstrong.

Rendell's book takes as its subject the role of the domestique, the journeyman pro whose job . 10. It's Not About the Bike: My Journey Back to Life by Lance Armstrong.

Rendell's book takes as its subject the role of the domestique, the journeyman pro whose job is to shepherd and protect the team leader, to fetch and carry food and drink, to chase down attacks, and, when necessary, to give up a wheel or even his entire bicycle to his master. It slightly goes against the grain to nominate Lance's bestseller - after all, doesn't he win enough? But this is just too big a book to ignore.

Armstrong riding the prologue of the 2004 Tour de France. He won sprint finishes from Basso in stages 13 and 15 and made up a significant gap in the last 250 m to nip Klöden at the line in stage 17. The pattern returned in 2003, Armstrong taking first place and Ullrich second. Only a minute and a second separated the two at the end of the final day in Paris Armstrong wearing the yellow jersey at the 2005 Tour de France.

An inside look at the 2003 Tour de France through the eyes of Lance Armstrong’s right-hand rider, the Colombian Victor Hugo Peña. Peña served as Armstrong’s domestique, a crucial yet unsung position unique to cycling. The domestique handles a variety of tasks, but his most important is to ride ahead of the team leader, creating a wind tunnel that makes it aerodynamically easier for the “star” to continue pedaling, even when his muscles are thoroughly exhausted. This is the essence of cycling, and the key to Armstrong’s victories. Yet the domestique gets none of the glory. Now, in revealing the true role of the domestique for the first time, Matt Rendell gives a more vivid and insightful portrayal of professional cycling than ever before.
Comments: (6)
Fenrinos
not only a great portrait of an exceptional rider, but also a very comprehensive overview of the Tour de France's history, as well as a guide for understanding a lot of what happens on the bike and inside a race peloton. Rendell is a very powerful storyteller. another great cycling book to be read many times over the years.
Dusar
Fantastic! (full review at later date)

Rendell really is an amazing writer. It's too bad his work wasn't in a more lucrative and high-profile field, however, since I can't help but feel that he's underappreciated and has toiled in relative obscurity.
Vishura
The part of this book about Victor Hugo Pena and the Tour for this year is exceptional. It provides tremendous insight as to the amazing physical ability of Pena, who was participating as a domestique, although he was a champion cyclist himself.
Victor's description of the pain during the time trial is classic. I may put that paragraph on my training room wall.
However when the author goes into detail on the TDF route over the years, it becomes tedious and for me, meaningless. Who cares how many times the TDF went through village X?
Then we get an interpretation of the tour and the history of France (if not all mankind) which lost me early on. Maybe these chapters should have been in another book.
In summary, I'm glad I read the book. The good outweighed the "not so interesting" part.
September
This book is on a different level, artistically and intellectually, from most cycling journalism. I've read a bevy of Tour de France books and this is the best by far. It takes a different angle on professional cycling, the perspective of the domestique, to show you things about the sport that you would never learn reading yet another book about Lance or the other stars. The story of Victor Hugo Pena (now exiled from Lance, but riding with another team, Phonak) is far more representative of life in the peloton than that of the stars, and so tells you so much more about the cruel, beautiful sport of cycling.
Morad
This is a curious book, cutting between Pena'a narrative of an individual stage, which is great if you're a racing cyclist (I am) or an enthusiastic fan, and Matt Randall's history and philosophy of bike racing. Matt could be accused of overly philosophising, especially when he's trying to use professional cycling as a metaphor for the sins of globalisation, which is a bit of a stretch. I enjoyed the read, the book misses out on a top rating because of Matt's final chapter. It's a bike race, fortunatly Pena provides the narrative to carry the politics!
Lestony
I bought this book because I thought I'd learn more about the job of the domestiques in general, and about Victor Hugo Pena specifically. And I really enjoyed the half of the book that was about Victor Hugo Pena. Those portions of the book are well written and engaging. But I was bored by the other half of the book that was more philosophical and historical. There are plenty of books about the history of the Tour de France and I would have bought one of those if I had wanted to read about the Tour. I wish the book had only been about domestiques and Victor Hugo Pena. The book is still worth a read, but it could have been so much better.