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eBook French Revolutions download

by Andrew Wincott,Tim Moore

eBook French Revolutions download ISBN: 1407439979
Author: Andrew Wincott,Tim Moore
Publisher: Whole Story Audio Books; Unabridged edition edition (July 1, 2009)
Language: English
ePub: 1658 kb
Fb2: 1517 kb
Rating: 4.8
Other formats: lrf azw txt doc
Category: Sports
Subcategory: Individual Sports

Or maybe the reader, Andrew Wincott, tries too hard.

His description of cycling the gruelling 2,256-mile Tour de France course on his own, ahead of the real thing, is great fun, full of his usual self-deprecating witticisms and wisecracks. But let's face it, bicycles are less funny than donkeys. Or maybe the reader, Andrew Wincott, tries too hard.

Tim Moore, Andrew Wincott (Narrator). ISBN: 1407439979 (ISBN13: 9781407439976).

by Tim Moore First published May 14th 2001. French Revolutions: Cycling the Tour de France (Paperback). Published June 6th 2002 by Vintage. Paperback, 277 pages. Author(s): Tim Moore. ISBN: 0099433826 (ISBN13: 9780099433828). Tim Moore, Andrew Wincott (Narrator).

French Revolutions Tim Moore. 63 people like this topic. Want to like this page?

French Revolutions Tim Moore.

Self-confessed loafer Tim Moore, seduced by the speed and glamour of the biggest annual sporting event in the world, sets out to cycle the Tour de France. Racing old men on butchers' bikes and being chased by cows, Moore soon resorts to standard race tactics - cheating and drugs - in a hilarious and moving tale of true adventure.

His sporting career cut short by rumour and innuendo, Tim Moore now writers for the Sunday Times, the Observer, the Financial Times and Esquire

His sporting career cut short by rumour and innuendo, Tim Moore now writers for the Sunday Times, the Observer, the Financial Times and Esquire. He lives quietly with his wife and three children in West London, entertaining them with nightly recitations of the critical praise lavished on his first book, Frost on My Moustache. His new book, Do Not Pass Go is due to be published in October 2003.

French Revolutions has many similarities to A Walk in the Woods by Bill Bryson, a book I enjoyed last year. Overall, French Revolutions entertains and encourages the reader to think about taking on their own adventure. Each covers the adventures of an ambitious self-powered traveler attempting a journey for which they are completely ill-equipped. Both have a heavy dose of comedy and sarcasm, poking fun at people they cross paths with and cursing treacherous terrain, but ultimately saving the most ridicule for themselves during the depths of their ineptitude. Both immediately plot and execute shortcuts to cheat days off their trips.

French Revolutions is Tim Moore's funniest book to date. It is also one of the funniest sports books ever written. Les. onnect with the author.

Conquer" may not be quite the right word. He cheats when he can, pops the occasional hayfever pill for an ephedrine rush (a fine old Tour tradition), sips cheap wine from his water bottle, and occasionally weeps on the phone to his wife. French Revolutions is Tim Moore's funniest book to date.

Cycling the Tour de France. Moore observes a changing France as he rides; small towns are dying, and local cycle clubs ride with a casualness that underlies a national softening. Moore's expertise on Tour history carries the narrative; from Paul Kimmage's race laundry tips to Bernard Hinault's champagne-filled water bottles, interesting detail abounds.

Andrew Wincott, Actor: Wiedzmin. Andrew Wincott was born in Banbury, Oxfordshire, England. 2011 The Book of Unwritten Tales (Video Game) Paladin (English version, voice). 2011 Anno 2070 (Video Game) Rufus Thorne (voice). 2010 Dead Nation (Video Game) Dr. Mordon (voice).

This is an heroic account of an inadequate man's attempt to achieve the unachievable. It's not easy cycling the Tour de France. Battling it out with old men on butchers' bikes and pursued by cattle, Tim Moore soon finds himself resorting to narcotic assistance and systematic overeating. Accounts of his suffering and chicanery, and those encountered in the race's history, are interwoven through a look at France's preparations for the most famous cycling event in the world. This recording is unabridged. Typically abridged audiobooks are not more than 60 per cent of the author's work and as low as 30 per cent with characters and plotlines removed.
Comments: (7)
Kulabandis
The Tour de France: a grueling 2000+ mile long bike race around France, up and down the Alps and Pyrenees, stretching on for 3 weeks. A race that professionals regularly fail to complete. What happens when an amateur that hasn’t biked in years attempts to take on the course? Tim Moore decides to find out, taking the reader through the often off-color history of the tour: cheating riders, abuse of performance-enhancing drugs, and the antics of crazed superfans. Moore oscillates between cursing terrible meals eaten along the way, reveling in the comradery of locals impressed by his undertaking, and moaning the destruction of small towns by creeping globalization. He fails spectacularly at boosting his performance through the abuse of over-the-counter amphetamines. Most of his misadventures are more mundane; he humorously bemoans his difficulties climbing mountains and the odd mechanical noises produced by his bicycle.

French Revolutions has many similarities to A Walk in the Woods by Bill Bryson, a book I enjoyed last year. Each covers the adventures of an ambitious self-powered traveler attempting a journey for which they are completely ill-equipped. Both have a heavy dose of comedy and sarcasm, poking fun at people they cross paths with and cursing treacherous terrain, but ultimately saving the most ridicule for themselves during the depths of their ineptitude. Both immediately plot and execute shortcuts to cheat days off their trips. The strength of Bryson’s book is its buddy comedy -- Bryson somehow found and convinced an out-of-shape old friend to join him for the journey. Moore’s journey is solo and leans heavier on the historic backbone both books use to build interest around the respective journeys.

Overall, French Revolutions entertains and encourages the reader to think about taking on their own adventure.
Kelezel
I laughed loud a few times when he described how mystified and clueless he was even in the face of a simple puncture and his attempts of saving face when talking to "real cyclists". I especially liked how he described his cheating in the mountains and covering it up in subsequent encounters.
Mostly it describes his slow transformation from a "Fred" to a cyclist and I got more than a little bit eager to try Le Tour myself one day (including the occasional cheating).
Runemane
The book's an enjoyable read, if a bit implausible at first, when the author claims such total ignorance of everything cycling, yet plans a 2000 mile trip. The style reminded me of Bill Bryson, though not reported with Bryson's ultra-sharp eye. I thought it was a fair mix of reportage and humor and once the narrative got past the 'I'm such an ill-prepared novice' confessional was an engaging read with some good historical research. By the way, Tim, the English champion was Percy Stallard, not Stannard.
Zeus Wooden
After reading it, I'm unsure whether to recommend it or nor. It is an amusing account of the author's attempt on cycling the Tour de France route, despite lacking both experience and fitness.

It is hilarious at best, but the style of Time Moore is an acquired taste. The language is rich, in fact it is swamped with curious words and British cultural references. Endangered words such as proboscis, ululations, stultifying, decorum, fatuousness, jocularity, etc are littered around the book - but after a while the effect of hyperinflation sets in and it becomes a slight annoyance.

In short, it is a book about the love of La Grande Boucle - thus a must for those who enjoy Tour de France, and recommended for those partial to cycling, but who have yet to get inflicted with the Tour fever.
Dddasuk
This is an entertaining book; the writing is unique, at times quite hilarious, and also at times a bit hard to follow with very esoteric references made that are supposed to be funny. Overall highly recommended to the cycling enthusiast.
Bukus
I didn't like the flippancy or overly Brit humor at first. But I grew to like the author as he morphed into a credible athlete by book's end. If you love the Tour or if you've toured by bike or foot in Europe, then you'll identify with many of his stories. It did stir a longing to have a go at some of those climbs.
Kagaramar
I loved this book. It was a little difficult to read as Moore is very British, but this also made the book entertaining.

It's was a slow read for me, but that gave me a chance to savor the trip!

I often felt I was right there with him on his journey around France.
A must read for all adventure travelers not just cyclists. So well written I feel like I was there feeling every experience and funny as well.