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eBook If This Land Could Talk: Homesteading on the Northern Plains download

by Judy R. Cook

eBook If This Land Could Talk: Homesteading on the Northern Plains download ISBN: 1935278991
Author: Judy R. Cook
Publisher: iUniverse (June 3, 2010)
Language: English
Pages: 236
ePub: 1327 kb
Fb2: 1643 kb
Rating: 4.8
Other formats: azw mobi rtf mobi
Category: Sports
Subcategory: Biographies

Few remained, but author Judy Cook's family never lost faith in the land. Cook's Dakota roots inspire a compelling story of her grandparents' homesteading experiences in North Dakota

Few remained, but author Judy Cook's family never lost faith in the land. Cook's Dakota roots inspire a compelling story of her grandparents' homesteading experiences in North Dakota. If This Land Could Talk provides a riveting look at three generations of life on the Northern Plains where Cook spent her formative years. Her candid portrayal brings to life her four grandparents who carved a living from the inhospitable prairie and her parents who continued to farm. She offers a poignant yet entertaining glimpse into her ancestors' daily lives

If This Land Could Talk: Homesteading on the Northern Plains.

If This Land Could Talk: Homesteading on the Northern Plains.

Millions of settlers flocked westward for homesteads, taking advantage of the free land .

Millions of settlers flocked westward for homesteads, taking advantage of the free land opened to settlement by the expanding railroads.

Homesteading on the Northern Plains. Judy R. Cook discovered amazing stories of struggle, survival, and scandal when she chronicled her grandparents’ lives as homesteaders on the northern plains. A retired technical writer, she lives with her husband, Robert, near Los Angeles. An intimate, personal exploration of early homestead life on the Northern Plains, and how the author’s ancestors not only survived but thrived for three generations. In the harsh environs of the Dakota prairies, only the most hardy stood a chance of lasting a single winter.

Few remained there, but author Judy Cook's family never lost faith in the land. Cook's Dakota roots inspire this compelling story of her grandparents' homesteading experiences in North Dakota

Few remained there, but author Judy Cook's family never lost faith in the land. Cook's Dakota roots inspire this compelling story of her grandparents' homesteading experiences in North Dakota. If This Land Could Talk provides a riveting look at three generations of life on the northern plains, where Cook spent her formative years. Her candid portrayal brings to life her four grandparents, who carved a living from the inhospitable prairie, and her parents, who continued to farm on the same land. She offers a poignant yet entertaining glimpse into her ancestors' daily lives.

Are you sure you want to remove Judy R. Cook from your list?

If This Land Could Talk Homesteading On The Northern Plains. Are you sure you want to remove Judy R. Cook from your list?

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Author and UND alumna Judy R. Cook will be at the Bookstore from 11 . Tuesday, Aug. 7, for a book signing of her memoir If This Land Could Talk: Homesteading on the Northern Plains. Cook is a native of Kidder County, . She tells the story of her four grandparents and their homesteading experiences in North Dakota. It offers a poignant yet entertaining glimpse into her ancestors’ daily lives, including childhood memories growing up on the family farm in the 1950s.

"Wow!...Great job of bringing this man [Tom] and his times to life...Definitely a winner!" -Megan Smolenyak, chief genealogist for Ancestry.com, author of Who Do You Think You Are?, and consultant to the TV series of the same name. Millions of settlers flocked westward for homesteads, taking advantage of the free land opened to settlement by the expanding railroads. Few remained there, but author Judy Cook's family never lost faith in the land. Cook's Dakota roots inspire this compelling story of her grandparents' homesteading experiences in North Dakota. If This Land Could Talk provides a riveting look at three generations of life on the northern plains, where Cook spent her formative years. Her candid portrayal brings to life her four grandparents, who carved a living from the inhospitable prairie, and her parents, who continued to farm on the same land. She offers a poignant yet entertaining glimpse into her ancestors' daily lives. The author recounts growing up on the same land in the 1950s, shaped by a way of life long since vanished. Based on meticulous research, personal experiences, and stories passed from family to family, If This Land Could Talk resonates with a powerful sense of place, an enduring love of the land, and reverence for the family.
Comments: (7)
HelloBoB:D
I found a cousin and learned more about my genealogy. Well written book.
Alister
Judy Cook has captured the flavor of a hardscrabble life on the Northern Plains through the eyes of her ancestors. Her research and personal knowledge give new insight about the settlers and their descendants in a unique section of this country during the late 18th to mid-19th centuries.
Nea
I enjoyed the stories about the author's family and the perils of homesteading in North Dakota. It was an excellent read.
Paxondano
This afternoon, I returned to Robinson, where I lived as a boy, to scatter the ashes of my father Garry Koenig on the farm that he grew up on. After this emotionally-charged event, I wearily sat down on my aunt's (Jean Jasper) sofa to think. While sitting there, my eyes casually floated to my aunt's bookcase where a signed copy of "If This Land Could Talk" was sitting. I picked it up, and thumbed through it, pausing to read the occasional paragraph here and there. Then, intrigued, I read the whole thing. Ms. Cook has brought to life for me the history of the area in which my father's father's father chose to raise his family in a way that no mere documentarian could. She provides glimpses of a time past that very few people today could remember, and has given me comfort in my time of grief. My compliments!
Skilkancar
The mood portrayed throughout the book was a strong sense of community. In countless anecdotes, Cook emphasized how the people of Kidder County looked out for one another. One of the opening incidents recounts a tale of a lynching which took place when an outsider killed his estranged wife and her elderly father who was a respected resident of the county. The lynch mob was seeking justice for one of their own.

One of the final incidents detailed by Cook occurred in 1973, when ten convicts escaped from the North Dakota State Penitentiary in Bismarck and traveled through Kidder County on their way to Canada. Two of the escapees wandered onto the farm of one of the neighbors of Judy's parents. The woman who lived there with her husband was alone and scared. She locked the doors and called her nearest neighbor, the author's father, who responded by coming to help her. That chapter was very exciting because the reader was not sure of the outcome. It does point out how closely knit this community was.

I enjoyed the presentation of words by the author. She sprinkles just enough interesting and unusual anecdotes with the genealogy of her ancestors. Her narration flows easily even when the subject matter is serious.

Many of the anecdotes are ones Cook remembers her father telling and retelling, so they have become a part of the family's oral history. When she decided to write the book, Cook researched the lore which had been passed down from generation to generation for its authenticity. Along the way, she obtained many photographs which are relevant to her stories. She shared these in her book.

A common thread that runs throughout the book is the family's love and respect for the land. I had the sense that they thought the land would always be there for them, if they could just hang on through this or that difficult situation. The author intimated that the land was unchanging no matter what occurred within the families. It seemed they would do anything to save the family land. It made me wonder if they owned the land or if it owned them! There was definitely a strong bond between land and family.

In reading some of the stories of Cook's four grandparents, the writer takes us into her confidence when we find out some of the family secrets throughout the chapters. This technique keeps us interested because the reader is like a part of the community or family.
Fecage
My favorite children's book is Caddie Woodlawn by Carol Ryrie Brink. My favorite adult history books are Bruce Catton's books on the Civil War such as A Stillness at Appomatox and Terribly Swift Sword.
Judy Cook's book combines the best of both. The characters are compelling, the events are very moving and the research is flawless. Characters like Petra make me hungry for more. Each chapter was so suspenseful and moving that I hated for it to end. There are over a dozen characters in this memoir that I would have gladly followed over the length of two hundred pages. Life for settlers of the Dakota plains may have been harsh but it is full of meaning, color, spirit and high drama.
Blackredeemer
Being a genealogist, myself, I enjoyed this book in which the author portrays the victories and hardships of her ancestors in North Dakota. She did a lot of research to uncover their behavior and personalities, not just the bare dates of birth, marriage and death one finds in dusty archives.

I cared about these people who lived in the recent past, and suffered with them when things went wrong. I could relate their lives to those of my own recent ancestors, who had much in common with them. My family didn't live in North Dakota, but the problems of people everywhere in the United States in the same time period were similar in many ways.

We find fault with our lives, and yet our standard of living is so much higher than that of people from even 50-100 years ago we should remember and honor them. This will help us appreciate what we have.
Everyone is fascinated by his or her family history. However, Judy Cook's family is particularly compelling and colorful. If This Land Could Talk is a definite "must read."--Candy Greene, author and consultant