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eBook The Last Amateurs: Playing for Glory and Honor in Division I College Basketball download

by John Feinstein

eBook The Last Amateurs: Playing for Glory and Honor in Division I College Basketball download ISBN: 0316278424
Author: John Feinstein
Publisher: Back Bay Books; Reprint edition (November 1, 2001)
Language: English
Pages: 480
ePub: 1232 kb
Fb2: 1602 kb
Rating: 4.6
Other formats: rtf mobi mbr lrf
Category: Sports
Subcategory: Basketball

John Feinstein is the author of several bestsellers, including books on golf (The Majors, A. .

John Feinstein is the author of several bestsellers, including books on golf (The Majors, A Good Walk Spoiled), basketball (A March to Madness, A Season on the Brink), and other sports. These men, now in their mid- and late-30’s, were featured in John Feinstein’s 2001 book, The Last Amateurs: Playing for Glory and Honor in Division I College Basketball

In The Last Amateurs, he mines the 1999-2000 season of Patriot League basketball

In The Last Amateurs, he mines the 1999-2000 season of Patriot League basketball. Given the high-stakes, high-profile, and often dirty world of college hoops these days, Feinstein comes up with a remarkably refreshing place to visit, a sporting environment short on scandals, prima donnas, and sneaker contracts, but long on a pure passion for the game that complements achievement in the classroom.

Especially after this book, The Last Amateurs. I recommend this book to any fan of college basketball, sports or just John Feinstein. The Last Amateurs is about a year in the life of the Patriot League for college basketball. The seven teams profiled during the 1999-2000 season include Layfayette, Army, Navy, Holy Cross, Lehigh, Colgate and Bucknell. Feinstein, much like other great college basketball books like A Season on the Brink, A Season Inside, Las Once again, John Feinstein turns in a great read. I hope he continues to write books, especially on college basketball, for years to come. Oct 27, 2012 Rebecca rated it it was amazing.

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Like millions who love college basketball, John Feinstein was first drawn to the game because of its intensity, speed and . The young men on these teams are playing for the love of the sport, of competition and of their schools.

Like millions who love college basketball, John Feinstein was first drawn to the game because of its intensity, speed and intelligence. John Feinstein spent a season with these players, uncovering the drama of their daily lives and the passions that drive them to commit hundreds of hours to basketball even when there is no chance of a professional future. He offers a look at American sport at its purest.

The Last Amateurs' is Feinstein's best work. At the time the schools did not offer athletic scholarships. The players played because they wanted to keep playing competitive hoops and they were all required to be real students. These games are played in small arenas far way from the glare of the big time spotlight

The Last Amateurs: Playing for Glory and Honor in Division I College Basketball

The Last Amateurs: Playing for Glory and Honor in Division I College Basketball. The Majors: In Pursuit of Golf’s Holy Grail. Mickle was bringing Foster and Armstrong in a day early to do some media interviews and I tagged along because it was an excuse to go home for a couple of days.

John Feinstein transports us to a world where in which Division I college basketball players care more about their . Feinstein has a gift for finding the numerous stories inside the story - and The Last Amateurs is no exception.

John Feinstein transports us to a world where in which Division I college basketball players care more about their grade point averages than points per game and are more likely to discuss the latest public utterances of Dick Cheney than Dick Vitale. It is a place where the players are all smarter than the vast majority of college students but must still work hard at thier studies- regardless of their on-court skills.

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John Feinstein is the author of several books that detail events and personalities in sports, including his most recent "The Last Amateurs: Play for Glory and Honor in Division I College Basketball. Other books include "Season on the Brink: A Year with Bob Knight and the Indiana Hoosiers," "Civil War, Army vs. Navy: A Year Inside College Football's Purest Rivalry," "The First Coming: Tiger Woods: Master or Martyr" and "The Majors: In Pursuit of Golf's Holy Grail. Feinstein writes regularly for Inside Sports, Golf Magazine, Tennis.

Like millions who love college basketball, John Feinstein was first drawn to the game because of its intensity, speed and intelligence. Like many others, he felt that the vast sums of money involved in NCAA basketball had turned the sport into a division of the NBA, rather than the beloved amateur sport it once was. He went in search of college basketball played with the passion and integrity it once inspired, and found the Patriot League. As one of the NCAA's smallest leagues, none of these teams leaves college early to join the NBA and none of these coaches gets national recognition or endorsement contracts. The young men on these teams are playing for the love of the sport, of competition and of their schools. John Feinstein spent a season with these players, uncovering the drama of their daily lives and the passions that drive them to commit hundreds of hours to basketball even when there is no chance of a professional future. He offers a look at American sport at its purest.
Comments: (7)
Boyn
According to LinkedIn, Chris Spitler is General Counsel and a Senior Vice-President at Nordea Bank. Pat Campolieta is an Advancement Officer at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. Steve Aylsworth is the CEO of JetLux Hotels. These men, now in their mid- and late-30’s, were featured in John Feinstein’s 2001 book, The Last Amateurs: Playing for Glory and Honor in Division I College Basketball,

Feinstein is a prolific chronicler of the American sporting life, having authored well written and easy to read books on everything from the Army-Navy football game and the Baltimore Ravens to the PGA Tour and Bob Knight. If I were to attempt to read every one of Feinstein’s books, I might have to live to age 107.

The organization of The Last Amateurs is familiar and easy to follow – Feinstein summarizes a Patriot League men’s college basketball season, highlighting the high and low points and crafting uncritical profiles of head coaches and players. Although a Season in Review concept is a common framework for a work of sports non-fiction, Feinstein’s literary talent sets The Last Amateurs apart from most jock/sportswriter diaries.

Since the publication of The Last Amateurs, the Patriot League has expanded from seven to ten teams, adding Loyola (Maryland), American and Boston University. Athletic scholarships are now available to basketball players attending Patriot League colleges. But the qualities that set the Patriot League apart from the pack remain intact. Most Patriot League games were (and still are) played before crowds of less than 1,500. The ESPN cameras are at seemingly every game on the Division I schedule, except the ones involving Patriot League schools. And most of the players, genuine scholar-athletes, are majoring in substantive disciplines, courses of study that will lead to something beyond a ten-day contract with the Orlando Magic.

For Spitler, Campolieta and Aylsworth, college basketball was a minor item on life’s resume, a stepping stone to what one hopes are rich and fulfilling lives.
Yannara
Feinstein has made a career selecting specific sports stories for in-depth analysis and a subsequent book. This time the story is a lowly Division 1 basketball conference that was formed under the premise of not issuing scholarships, therefore the title of the book. This book is at it's best examining personal stories of individual players. How they got here, family issues effecting college educations, and the personal motivation that keeps kids playing basketball without significant minutes or monetary reward are covered in detail with brillance. Of course, the most famous is the worst player on the worst team in the worst conference in Division 1a basketball who uses that as a pick-up line. But many more stories are just as funny or touching including the stories of the coaches.
The author is at his best telling these individual stories or commenting on how these true amatuers play for the challenge of competitive sports. You find yourself wishing all college sports could go back to true students who are athletes. Where the author failed was in overlaying these stories and moral questions around the complete season covering all the teams. There are just too many names and too many teams to keep track of. My first thought was that he should have had a diagram page in the center section showing the players on each team and where they finished the year. But that might not have cured the problem. Maybe he should have selected a couple of teams and overlayed their seasons with short stories of the other teams as they were played. Or maybe he should have written more in short story form with each chapter covering a team. Irrespective, it's just too much data for a reader looking for enjoyment. I do recommend this book and found the good outweighs the bad. Just be forwarned of the confusion, particularly in the middle of the book.
As a matter of disclosure, I did not attend nor have any interest in any of the colleges mentioned in the book as many previous readers have had.
Jode
After hearing My Feinstein discuss this book on The Jim Rome show, I decided to give it a chance. Overall, I enjoyed reading about life in the Patriot League during the 2000 basketball season. The only problems that I had with the book is that it tries to cover so much. An entire season, 7 teams, coaches, players, and as a result, I was disappointed that I did not get a more in depth look at some of the players and coaches. I felt that this was a series of magazine bios on the coaches interspaced with descriptions of the games. I did like the book and if you are interested in basketball and a fan. This book will take you into a world where the kids play because they love the game, knowing there is pretty much no chance they will make a living from basketball. If you like Feinstain (I'm reading my second), pick this up. You won't be disappointed.