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eBook Baseball's All-Time Best Hitters: How Statistics Can Level the Playing Field download

by Michael J. Schell

eBook Baseball's All-Time Best Hitters: How Statistics Can Level the Playing Field download ISBN: 0691123438
Author: Michael J. Schell
Publisher: Princeton University Press (March 27, 2005)
Language: English
Pages: 320
ePub: 1181 kb
Fb2: 1548 kb
Rating: 4.6
Other formats: mbr azw lit lrf
Category: Sports
Subcategory: Baseball

How Statistics Can Level the Playing Field. The aim of this book is to identify the 100 all-time best hitters, where best hitters means the best hitters for average.

How Statistics Can Level the Playing Field. Princeton university press princeton, new jersey. Published by Princeton University Press, 41 William Street, Princeton, New Jersey 08540.

Baseball's All-Time Best Hitters book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read

Baseball's All-Time Best Hitters book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Baseball's All-Time Best Hitters: How Statistics Can Level the Playing Field as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Michael Schell challenges the traditional list of all-time hitters, which . In this book I have tried to identify the best 100 hitters in the history of major league baseball.

Michael Schell challenges the traditional list of all-time hitters, which places Ty Cobb first, Gwynn 16th, and includes just 8 players whose prime came after 1960.

Baseball's All-Time Best Hitters How Statistics Can Level the Playing Field by Michael J. Schell and Publisher Princeton University Press. How Statistics Can Level the Playing Field. Save up to 80% by choosing the eTextbook option for ISBN: 9781400850631, 1400850630. The print version of this textbook is ISBN: 9780691123431, 0691123438. By: Michael J. Schell. Publisher: Princeton University Press. Print ISBN: 9780691123431, 0691123438.

Tony Gwynn is the greatest hitter in the history of baseball. That's the conclusion of this engaging and provocative analysis of baseball's all-time best hitters

Tony Gwynn is the greatest hitter in the history of baseball. That's the conclusion of this engaging and provocative analysis of baseball's all-time best hitters. Michael Schell challenges the traditional list of all-time hitters, which places Ty Cobb first, Gwynn 16th, and includes just 8 players whose prime came after 1960.

Schell's statistics "level" the playing field because they downplay the importance of power, thus favoring Gwynn. Schell is on more solid ground when he proposes players who should be included in the Hall of Fame. All in all, this book is for the hardcore baseball fan, especially one comfortable with complex statistical analysis. For comprehensive baseball collections. APaul M. Kaplan, Lake Villa Dist.

All-Time Best Hitters : How Statistics Can Level the Playing Field. One of the best baseball books ever written. com User, August 7, 2008. Baseball fans love to engage in "who's the best" debates.

Baseball's All-Time Best Hitters : How Statistics Can Level the Playing Field. by Michael J.

Publisher: Princeton University Press. Indeed, the top fifteen traditional all-time best hitters all played before 1960, with the majority of them playing in the early part of the century. The author develops an alternate method in the first five chapters of the text. It is richly motivated, using baseball's history, facts and anecdotes. So, based upon this method, who is baseball's all-time best hitter? He is not Ty Cobb or Roger Hornsby or Joe Jackson but a player currently playing for the San Diego Padres. Randall J. Swift (randall. eduis associate professor of mathematics at Western Kentucky University.

Schell, Michael . aseball’s All-Time Best Hitters: How Statistics Can Level the Playing Field, Princeton University Press, Princeton . aseball’s All-Time Best Hitters: How Statistics Can Level the Playing Field, Princeton University Press, Princeton, 1999. Authors and Affiliations.

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Tony Gwynn is the greatest hitter in the history of baseball. That's the conclusion of this engaging and provocative analysis of baseball's all-time best hitters. Michael Schell challenges the traditional list of all-time hitters, which places Ty Cobb first, Gwynn 16th, and includes just 8 players whose prime came after 1960. Schell argues that the raw batting averages used as the list's basis should be adjusted to take into account that hitters played in different eras, with different rules, and in different ballparks. He makes those adjustments and produces a new list of the best 100 hitters that will spark debate among baseball fans and statisticians everywhere.

Schell combines the two qualifications essential for a book like this. He is a professional statistician--applying his skills to cancer research--and he has an encyclopedic knowledge of baseball. He has wondered how to rank hitters since he was a boy growing up as a passionate Cincinnati Reds fan. Over the years, he has analyzed the most important factors, including the relative difficulty of hitting in different ballparks, the length of hitters' careers, the talent pool that players are drawn from, and changes in the game that raised or lowered major-league batting averages (the introduction of the designated hitter and changes in the height and location of the pitcher's mound, for example). Schell's study finally levels the playing field, giving new credit to hitters who played in adverse conditions and downgrading others who faced fewer obstacles. His final ranking of players differs dramatically from the traditional list. Gwynn, for example, bumps Cobb to 2nd place, Rod Carew rises from 28th to 3rd, Babe Ruth drops from 9th to 16th, and Willie Mays comes from off the list to rank 13th. Schell's list also gives relatively more credit to modern players, containing 39 whose best days were after 1960.

Using a fun, conversational style, the book presents a feast of stories and statistics about players, ballparks, and teams--all arranged so that calculations can be skipped by general readers but consulted by statisticians eager to follow Schell's methods or introduce their students to such basic concepts as mean, histogram, standard deviation, p-value, and regression. Baseball's All-Time Best Hitters will shake up how baseball fans view the greatest heroes of America's national pastime.

Comments: (7)
Bladecliff
Excellent historical background and sound baseball-based and mathematical basis for the evolution of the revolution in baseball batter statistics. The revised comparison of the best hitters in baseball history, and the reasons for this, grab the readers' attention in a dramatic (but statistical) way. I have made sections of this book the basis of some of the bedtime readings (with my explanations added) to my nine year old grandson who is really into baseball and the associated statistics, and he's fascinated with this and asks me to continue these readings when I fly to his house for visits.
Darksinger
Mr. Schell's book on baseball will disappoint nearly all ordinary baseball fans. It is loaded with statistical analysis that is nonintuitive and produces very counterintuitive results. For Mr. Schell, it seems that the facts must be made to fit the theory rather than the other way round. To be sure, some of the ways that are used to judge hitting prowess are not merely innovative but highly illuminating. But we don't want to throw out the baby with the bathwater. The idea that Tony Gwynn is the best hitter of all time and that Babe Ruth is far down in the standings is going a bit too far.

Mr. Schell has a more more recent book that will seem more sensible to most fans. It gives weight to slugging ability or so-called power hitting and restores Ruth to a high place in the pecking order and drops Gwynn to a spot we can believe in.
fr0mTheSkY
As advertised
Fordredor
Tony Gwynn may well be the greatest hitter of all - if you're talking strictly batting average; but even then Cobb (12 batting crowns), Wagner (8 batting titles), Musial (7 crowns), Hornsby (7 crowns), Ted Williams (6 crowns, and that's with missing 5 peak years), Sisler, Joe Jackson, Dan Brouthers, and a few others must be dealt with. But since when is batting average the sole, or even the primary, criteria? As much as I like batting average, how about Home Runs, RBI, Slugging Percentage?

Tony hit 135 homers in his career. Three Gwynns wouldn't have equaled the number of HRs by one Mays, or one Aaron, or one Frank Robinson, or one Musial, one Mantle, one Williams, etc. Yet all of these guys did pretty well with batting average and batting titles, too. In fact, they are all far closer to (or, in some cases, equal to) Tony in batting average than Tony is to them in round trippers. And this doesn't even get into RBI, Slugging, etc.

I admire Tony, but Tony is no Ted or Willie or Hank or Stanley Frank or Robbie or Mick or Rajah. Just to name a few. Not even including Lou and
Foxx and Babe and Junior and Dimag and Ott. And, yes, Cobb and Shoeless, too. And, I've intentionally excluded all the steroid power boys of the 1990s and 21st century (Bonds and Pujols and ARod, etc.). Tony might make the top fifteen hitters, but I doubt even that, and certainly not the top ten. But these days anybody with the number-crunching power enabled by a computer can find thousands of ways of getting himself a little attention by lying with numbers.

In our benighted age, data is the opiate of the people.
sobolica
Most baseball fans like statistics, so it should not be a disappointment to them to find out that this is an elementary statistics book where the statistical methods are taught to explain how to adjust batting averages in order to compare players in terms of their batting averages. The average baseball fan would be interested in comparisons of Ty Cobb, Tony Gwynn, Ted Williams and others who are acknowledged as the best hitters for average in the game. Schell considers factors that make direct comparisons unfair and he provides methods to adjust for these factors based on the vast amount of statistical data available to him that has been gathered throughout the history of major league baseball.
Key effects include the home ball park, stage of career and interventions such as the lowering of the pitcher's mound after 1968. To adjust for players whose abilities decline substantially in the latter years of their career Schell uses only the first 8000 at bats to gauge the players hitting ability. This helps players like Mickey Mantle whose performance declined appreciably at the end of his career due in part to injuries.

Schell provides a lot of interesting statistics and comparisons. Ty Cobb had the highest lifetime batting average but after all the adjustments finishes second to Tony Gwynn, a result that will surely create controversy.

Nevertheless Schell's approach makes sense and his results are not too surprising. As he notes his adjustments move many of the modern players whose numerical averages are lower than the players from the late 1800s and early 1900s, ahead on the list.

Schell relates how he showed up to meet and congratulate Gwynn on the date of his 8000th at bat when he clinched first place based on the Schell adjustment system.

Mike Schell is a sports enthusiast and a professor of biostatistics at the University of North Carolina. In 2002 he was one of the invited speakers at the Sport Statistics Section Session of the Joint Statistical Meetings.

This book was published just one month after his other book on home run hitters. The methodology is quite similar. This book got a lot more fan fare due to the publicity regarding Tony Gwynn.