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eBook Sacred Passage: How to Provide Fearless, Compassionate Care for the Dying download

by Margaret Coberly Ph.D RN

eBook Sacred Passage: How to Provide Fearless, Compassionate Care for the Dying download ISBN: 1570628505
Author: Margaret Coberly Ph.D RN
Publisher: Shambhala; 1 edition (March 12, 2002)
Language: English
Pages: 144
ePub: 1470 kb
Fb2: 1173 kb
Rating: 4.7
Other formats: azw docx mobi txt
Category: Self-Help
Subcategory: Death and Grief

Working as an emergency room nurse, Margaret Coberly came in contact with death on a daily basis. An important book for both caregivers and patients

Working as an emergency room nurse, Margaret Coberly came in contact with death on a daily basis. An important book for both caregivers and patients. Coberly compellingly demonstrates how terminally ill people can experience emotional and spiritual healing, even when they cannot be cured. -Journal of Hospice and Palliative Nursing. A much-needed, wise, and helpful guidebook. director of Hospice Nursing Consultants. This is a rich and wise book that will help many people. -Joan Halifax Roshi, Project on Being with Dying, Upaya Zen Center. From the Inside Flap.

Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by Lotu Tii on February 25, 2014.

An important book for both caregivers and patients. Demonstrates how terminally ill people can experience emotional and spiritual healing, even when they cannot be cured. Recently added by. UUCFLibrary, UUCSC, VanessaCowie, tjkrisher, arangybird, Chenrezig Institute, bertlvx, DGCEC.

Coberly shows us how this view generates fear and denial, which harm the dying by adding unnecessary loneliness, confusion, and mental anguish to the dying process. Tibetan Buddhism focuses on the nature of death and how to face it with honesty, openness, and courage. In this view, death is not a failure, but a natural part of life that, if properly understood and appreciated, can offer the dying and their loved ones an opportunity to gain valuable insight and wisdom.

This survey of providing fearless, compassionate care for the dying reflects the author's work as an emergency . Sacred Passage is a remarkable and timely book - a consummate marriage of the art of living and the art of dying.

The Western fear of death generates denial and isolation; Tibetan Buddhism focuses on the nature of death, and Sacred Passage illustrates two practical applications of the philosophy for the dying and their caretakers. The Treasure is Always There. Published by Thriftbooks. com User, 17 years ago. Sacred Passage is a remarkable and.

Margaret Coberly is uniquely qualified to guide this down-to-earth exploration about how to care for the dying. Sacred Passage offers essential insights of benefit to everyone who cares for terminally ill patients, insights that can transform sad events into opportunities for spiritual awareness. After many years of professional emergency room and hospice nursing experience, she completed a doctorate in psychology in which she explored Tibetan Buddhist perspectives on death and the application of these perspectives in caring for the dying.

Request PDF On Jul 1, 2002, Karma Lekshe Tsomo and others published Sacred Passage: How to Provide .

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MARGARET COBERLY, P.

One important and obvious realization that can come to light when thinking about death is that death is inevitable. Through the process of further reflection, a greater awareness of death occurs and eventually a calm presence in the face of death can be developed. This article is excerpted from: Sacred Passage: How to Provide Fearless, Compassionate Care for the Dying by Margaret Coberly, P. MARGARET COBERLY, P. has been a nurse for more than thirty years, working in inner-city trauma centers and in hospice settings. She holds a doctorate in psychology and lectures at the University of Hawaii.

Working as an emergency room nurse, Margaret Coberly came in contact with death on a daily basis. However, it wasn't until her own brother was diagnosed with terminal cancer that she realized she understood very little about the emotional and spiritual aspects of caring for the terminally ill. To fill this gap she turned to the unique wisdom on death and dying found in Tibetan Buddhism. In this book Coberly offers sound, practical advice on meeting the essential needs of the dying, integrating stories from her long career in nursing with useful insights from the Tibetan Buddhist teachings. In the West, death is viewed as a tragic and horrible event. Coberly shows us how this view generates fear and denial, which harm the dying by adding unnecessary loneliness, confusion, and mental anguish to the dying process. Tibetan Buddhism focuses on the nature of death and how to face it with honesty, openness, and courage. In this view, death is not a failure, but a natural part of life that, if properly understood and appreciated, can offer the dying and their loved ones an opportunity to gain valuable insight and wisdom. Coberly argues that the Tibetan Buddhist outlook can be a useful antidote to the culture of fear and denial that surrounds death in the West and can help caregivers become more fully present, fearless, honest, and compassionate. Sacred Passage highlights two very practical teachings on death and dying from the Tibetan Buddhist tradition and presents them in clear, nontechnical language. Readers learn about the "eight stages of dissolution leading to death," a detailed roadmap of the dying process that describes the sequence of physical, psychological, and spiritual changes that occur as we die. Coberly also presents the "death meditation," a contemplative exercise for developing a new relationship to death—and life. The book also includes a lengthy, annotated list of recommended readings for added guidance and inspiration. Topics include: How the terminally ill can experience emotional and spiritual healing even when they can't be cured Why Western medicine's relentless focus on curing disease has led to inadequate care for the dying What to expect during the dying process How our fear and denial of death harm the dying Techniques to help caregivers promote a peaceful environment for the dying and their loved ones How to meet the changing physical and emotional needs of the dying Helpful advice on what to say and how to behave around the terminally ill
Comments: (7)
6snake6
If you are preparing for the death of a loved one, Margaret Coberley combines personal experience with the deaths of family members, professional experience as a nurse, and Buddhist philosophy into a fantastic "guidebook". There is detailed information here about the physical signs of the dissolution stages of death that I have found nowhere else. If you wish to understand what the person who is transitioning may be experiencing, and what they might find comforting, this information is incredibly helpful. Her orientation is Buddhist philosophy but whatever your belief system, thIs is great information to have. She also provides a lot of information on alternative funerals. I have bought and passed on many copies of this book and am now delighted to see it is a Kindle.
Yozshujinn
Finally! The book has been written. During my 15 years as a hospice nurse, countless caregivers, students and volunteers have asked me "Which book should I read?" This is The Book, both succinctly written and easy to read. With great compassion, Dr. Coberly covers nearly all our secret fears and inadequacies by talking about her own beginnings using wonderful heart warming stories. Many of us have tried and failed to understand the Tibetan Books of the Dead. She makes the Tibetan Buddhist view on death and dying understandable to a Westerner. And she finishes this brilliant piece by giving us the tools we need to face death with great love. The annotated list of recommended readings alone is worth the price of the book. Nurses can log onto a website listed on the inside back cover and take a test for CEU's.
Benn
A brief and very accessible survey book on a topic that is much neglected, ignored and avoided and, yet, which every one will surely encounter. The author draws much of her inspiration from Tibetan Buddhism and this is a really well done introduction to the wisdom about death and dying that the Tibetans have so brilliantly refined over hundreds of years. An especially valuable aspect of this book is her excellent bibliography, which provides wonderful resources for further study.
IGOT
This feels like something with 10 pages of good content padded out with some standard Buddhist information. I found the case histories interesting but basically I got a lot more out of the hospice people's advice than I did from this book.
generation of new
Really enjoyed this read. The author had a great preceptive on death and dying from a nurse.
Butius
Excellent service and WONDERFUL book!! THANK YOU!!!
POFOD
Not a bad read, but not exactly what I was looking for as a newer Hospice Nurse.
This book is a very good book dealing with the dying. Ms. Coberly writes in detail about actions a caregiver can and should give when caring for someone who is dying.