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eBook The Vanishing Word: The Veneration of Visual Imagery in the Postmodern World (Focal Point Series) download

by Gene Edward Jr. Veith,Arthur W. Hunt III

eBook The Vanishing Word: The Veneration of Visual Imagery in the Postmodern World (Focal Point Series) download ISBN: 158134404X
Author: Gene Edward Jr. Veith,Arthur W. Hunt III
Publisher: Crossway (March 3, 2003)
Language: English
Pages: 272
ePub: 1597 kb
Fb2: 1389 kb
Rating: 4.7
Other formats: doc lit docx azw
Category: Religious
Subcategory: Religious Studies

There are very few books I have read that have impressed me like this book

There are very few books I have read that have impressed me like this book. The author writes a clear and interesting history of the necessity of the commanded obedience of faith in what God has said (without a "seen" image or experience) versus the lies of the this world requiring a "seen" image

This may seem to be an accurate description of every commercial aired on TV, but such commercials are actually symptomatic of a much more important cultural shift.

This may seem to be an accurate description of every commercial aired on TV, but such commercials are actually symptomatic of a much more important cultural shift. Arthur Hunt argues that there is a conceptual transformation taking place today, as we move from an emphasis on the "word" to the predominance of the "image.

The Vanishing Word book. He warns that by exalting imagery we risk becoming mindless pagans to be abused by those who exploit the image but neglect the Word.

Arthur Hunt's "The Vanishing Word" is a helpful and insightful salvo in the battle to preserve the written word in an age enamored . Hunt points out that very few, if any good Christian hymns have been written in the past 70 years.

Arthur Hunt's "The Vanishing Word" is a helpful and insightful salvo in the battle to preserve the written word in an age enamored with images. Hunt is currently a professor of speech and communications at Geneva College in Beaver Falls, Pennsylvania. Although he teaches speech and communications, his real expertise is in the fledgling discipline of Media Ecology. Prior to that, theologians wrote many of the hymns with some musical abilities whereas much to today's "gospel songs" are written by musicians lacking a theological understanding.

Arthur W. Hunt III, Gene Edward, Jr. Veith - The Vanishing Word: The Veneration of Visual Imagery in the Postmodern World (Focal Point Series). Arthur W. Veith. Читать pdf. Diana Bedward, John Stredwick - Managing Information: Core Management. Diana Bedward, John Stredwick.

The Veneration of Visual Imagery in the Postmodern World · Focal Point. Hunt contrasts our word-dependent Judeo-Christian heritage with image-dependent paganism. Learn how to read digital books for free. Hunt III is associate professor of communications at The University of Tennessee at Martin. This book puts history as well as our current media driven society in context

Arthur W. This book puts history as well as our current media driven society in context. One person found this helpful.

Sounds blare and pictures flash frantically across the screen. This may seem to be an accurate description of every commercial aired on TV, but such commercials are actually symptomatic of a much more important cultural shift. Arthur Hunt argues that there is a conceptual transformation taking place today, as we move from an emphasis on the "word" to the predominance of the "image."

Hunt focuses on the contrast between a Judeo-Christian heritage, characteristically word-dependent-and paganism, typically image-dependent. As people trust experience and visual representations to interpret their surroundings, they focus less on content and more on sensory appeal. Hunt argues that movements like the Protestant Reformation, Puritanism, and the beginnings of the American nation were all created and sustained in an environment that transmitted its ideas through words, while historical shifts to emphasize image have occurred during periods like the Dark Ages. As the word, both written and spoken, is devalued, there is a renewed descent into paganism.

A wide range of issues-education, politics, entertainment, postmodernism-are brought together in an incisive, illuminating way. This book examines trends in today's culture and churches that lead away from a word-centered world and into an image-soaked world ripe for propaganda and a demagogue.

Comments: (7)
Bukelv
There are very few books I have read that have impressed me like this book. The author writes a clear and interesting history of the necessity of the commanded obedience of faith in what God has said (without a "seen" image or experience) versus the lies of the this world requiring a "seen" image. From the beginning in the Garden of Eden to Egypt to the propaganda used by Germany in the World Wars to the present "idols" used by the Church today (and I don't mean statues, I mean shallow music and "performance-driven" services)to where we are being lead to in the last days.

This book will humble you and inspire you. This is a book for "everyone" to read! It is well-written and an enjoyable read. It is NOT one of the boring intellectual books that you grow tired because you cannot understand it- it will hold you until the end.

I have been so inspired by this book, I have purchased 15 copies over the years to just give to people to read- it is that important for the Christian Church in this present age.
anneli
This book puts history as well as our current media driven society in context. One of my favorite aspects of this book is how it goes through the entirety of history in the context of how the study and emphasis of written word -- by a God who defines Himself with the power of words rather than images -- has impacted each era.
Flarik
Outstanding treatment of how the Word is being deemphasized and diminished in current Christianity and contemporary worship expressions.
Goltigor
Great and informative. Makes you think.
Acrobat
Thoughtful, thorough and even-handed look at the history of the effects of word and imagery upon cultures with special looks into ancient cultures as well as modern application for western life today. A fascinating read!
Hasirri
Informative
Zicelik
Drawing on the work of some of our best social critics (particularly Neil Postman), Mr. Hunt indicts American culture for returning to pagan idolatry--the idolatry of the ever-present visual image. This is closely connected to the cult of celebrity (people "well known for being well known" (Boorstin) not for any discernible achievement) and its accompanying spectacles.
Hunt appropriates some of the insights of C. Paglia that America has returned to a pagan worldview, especially in popular media. As a Christian, however, he refuses to celebrate this, but instead registers a jeremiad--and a very well informed and prophetic one at that. We must return to the Word as our primary way of acquiring and treasuring knowledge. The image, while important in some dimensions, is the easy tool of propaganda and manipulation; it often deceptive, and lacks the conceptual resources available to typography. "In the beginning was the Word," declares the Gospel of John, not "the image."
This book expands on recent articles published in "The Christian Research Journal" and provides a short history of western culture from the vantage point of communications theory (in which the author is trained).
I give the book four stars, not five, only because there is, to my knowledge, very little original material. It is largely derivative; however, Americans seldom fathom the significance of the sources upon which Hunt draws. We should thank him for making them available in this crisp and telling critique.
Douglas Groothuis, Ph.D., Denver Seminary
As a fan of Gene Veith, Neil Postman and Allan Bloom, I noted this book as inspired by the dialogue between Postman and Camille Paglia. It is an excellent book and well worth the read but following the natural urge to find something to disagree with while we walk the same road in the same direction, I would like to engage a few issues that I find especially intriguing even though they are small potatoes in the whole stew.

When AWH critiques or contrasts the Egyptians with the Hebrews by referring to the Egyptians as image based and the Hebrews based, we certainly should agree, but the images of the Egyptians were their alphabet at least at some point. Hieroglyphs apparently came to represent sounds (didn't they?). The feather in a sense becomes a letter? The shift to a phonetic aleph bet was certainly significant but they are still images - images of the letters. Perhaps images of the shape of the mouth (at least symbolically) while making the sounds - think of Greek Theta or just the letter "o". So the contrast between the Egyptians and the Hebrews is certainly there but how sharp a contrast should we think it is? I wonder.... In any case, AWH even remarks that the "Egyptians thought Toth invented writing" (p. 37) so this is certainly a matter of degree. We might also wonder why "advanced civilizations cannot exist without writing" (as AWH quotes Gelb) if this might be because they need a recording system. Would video do? (I imagine reading a book presented as a DVD, for example.) Is video text as the postmodernists might say? In which case, the vanishing word is not vanished at all but more powerful than ever in digital form.

An interesting contrast to this book is Steven Johnson's "Everything Bad is Good for You."