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by Jim Trainor

eBook Grasp: Making Sense of Science and Spirituality download ISBN: 1456354086
Author: Jim Trainor
Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform (December 2, 2010)
Language: English
Pages: 176
ePub: 1227 kb
Fb2: 1182 kb
Rating: 4.1
Other formats: txt doc mobi txt
Category: Religious
Subcategory: Religious Studies

Jim Trainor has blessed us with a very readable book that celebrates the wisdom and wonder of both science and faith. Much needed in this day and age. Grasp: Making Sense of Science and Spirituality.

Jim Trainor has blessed us with a very readable book that celebrates the wisdom and wonder of both science and faith. Trainor is a physicist and Episcopal priest. There are plenty of books by other s (. Polkinghorne, Peacocke, or Ellis) and definitive textbooks on science and religion (Ian Barbour's), but Trainor offers something refreshingly approachable. His argument is simple - that science offers knowing by observation, looking at effects, and the testimony of witnesses.

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Grasp: Making Sense of Science and Spirituality as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

We are all trying to grasp the answers to the big questions  . Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read.

For years, I had already been pondering that question, and the answer can be found in my first book, Grasp: Making Sense of Science and Spirituality. Jim Trainor is the author of six books. Now I’ve written four novels: Waverly’s Universe (my first novel since that masterpiece I created when I was five), The Sand People, Up North, and my latest: The Mountain Goat, to be published in early 2017. physicist, formerly Deputy Division Director for Physics for the nation’s largest physics department (Los Alamos National Laboratory), and an ordained Episcopal priest. Jim wrote his first novel when he was five.

The notion that science and spirituality are somehow mutually exclusive does .

The notion that science and spirituality are somehow mutually exclusive does a disservice to both. The friction between science and religion stretches from Galileo’s famous letter to today’s leading thinkers. We had better make the best of it. When we finally come to terms with it and fully recognize its beauty and its power, we will find, in spiritual as well as in practical matters, that we have made a bargain strongly in our favor. In its encounter with Nature, science invariably elicits a sense of reverence and awe. The very act of understanding is a celebration of joining, merging, even if on a very modest scale, with the magnificence of the Cosmos.

Books by Jim Trainor

Books by Jim Trainor. As Ed becomes increasingly desperate to find a way out of this mind-bending nightmare, he is aided by a quirky high-school student who reads college physics books, a crusty old quantum physicist, and classmates at the reunion: including a psychiatrist, a pastor and a fisherman from Alaska. And he encounters Ellen, who he never dated but who could have been the love of his life. But nothing can prepare Ed for the startling appearance of a late-arriving guest, who will challenge everything he thought was possible and force him to confront the tragedy that has shaped his life.

Spirituality is Science We Don’t Fully Understand Ye. Our rational minds create blinders to truth, even when we can sense that there is more to existence than what we can perceive with our five senses.

Spirituality is Science We Don’t Fully Understand Yet. Dr. Lisa Galarneau. Dec 31, 2016 · 10 min read. Started to realize that there might be more to the story, but I had no idea how to find the truth. Was a bit of a science nerd and coddled my logical, rational, evidence-based worldview. I was also disappointed by the dogma I encountered in my truth-seeking endeavors.

Sense about Science is a United Kingdom charitable organization that promotes the public understanding of science. Sense about Science was founded in 2002 by Lord Taverne, Bridget Ogilvie and others to promote respect for scientific evidence and good science. Sense about Science was established as a charitable trust in 2003, with 14 trustees, an advisory council and a small office staff. Tracey Brown has been the director since 2002.

Fritjof Capra explores how Science and Spirituality can be fused in an integrated system that returns us to a sense of oneness with the natural world. From my early student years, I was fascinated by the dramatic changes of concepts and ideas that occurred in physics during the first three decades of the twentieth century.

We are all trying to grasp the answers to the big questions

We are all trying to grasp the answers to the big questions. Why are we here? How did we get here, and just what is our place in this vast and mysterious 'here' we call the universe? Is there a meaning to it all? Where do we go for answers, amidst the tangle of our networked lives? Some of us seek answers in science, while others seek answers in philosophy or religion or history.

We are all trying to grasp the answers to the big questions. Why are we here? How did we get here, and just what is our place in this vast and mysterious ‘here’ we call the universe? Is there a meaning to it all? Where do we go for answers, amidst the tangle of our networked lives? Some of us seek answers in science, while others seek answers in philosophy or religion or history. Does either science or religion have all the answers to the big questions we have, or does one contradict the other? In Grasp: Making Sense of Science and Religion, Jim Trainor draws upon his experience as a professional physicist and as a church pastor to tackle these issues and show how modern science supports the search for truth through religious faith. Grasp leads you deep into the heart of the matter, even if you have no background in either science or religion. Grasp explores the intersection of modern physics with the claims of an ancient Judeo-Christian faith, bringing together the thoughts of great scientific and religious thinkers with the real-life stories of people who have grasped for the truth.
Comments: (6)
Trex
Jim Trainor has blessed us with a very readable book that celebrates the wisdom and wonder of both science and faith. Trainor is a physicist and Episcopal priest. There are plenty of books by other scientist/theologians (c.f. Polkinghorne, Peacocke, or Ellis) and definitive textbooks on science and religion (Ian Barbour's), but Trainor offers something refreshingly approachable. His argument is simple - that science offers knowing by observation, looking at effects, and the testimony of witnesses. Faith adds knowledge gained through the experience of personal relationship. Our experience of love, whether our grandmother's or God's, is not subject to scientific analysis, but it is exactly this experience that helps us with exactly those questions we care about most.

This is an exceptionally accessible book in an easy-going style. It can be read while settled in a comfortable armchair or as part of a small group study (it comes complete with a guide and some leading questions for each section). The book is solid in its science and theology, and Trainor is particularly engaging when he expresses the limits of what we can grasp about the nature of our world.

If I had to quibble, I'd say that Trainor seems to accept some rather shaky traditional claims about authorship of the gospels and glosses notorious problems with eye witnesses and emotional testimony. But these are quibbles, and his footing is firm when he moves on to show how central relationship and trust are in Christian faith. Perhaps the best summary of his view is the quote he provides from Frederick Buechner:

"It is not objective proof of God's existence that we want but... the experience of God's presence. That is the miracle we are really after. And that is also, I think, the miracle that we really get." [36]
Oreavi
Presents some good insights and good arguments. But the first 1/3 of the book does not hook the reader like it should. Non-believers, especially, I feel will be turned away by the first part. But the last 2/3 of the book are excellent and I think any believer or non-believer would appreciate.

Overall, it's a fast read that gives good food for thought.
Molotok
good read
Bukus
It seems that most people feel that the worlds of religion and science are mutually exclusive. Those on the side of science see religion as irrational; those on the side of religion see science as cold and closed minded.
In Grasp Jim Trainor, who has had a distinguished career with some of the country's major scientific facilities, tears down the wall of separation. He shows us that the two are in fact intertwined and, to my delight, he does it with both logic and humor.
It's a good read that you will be recommending to your friends.
Goldendragon
Pretty good little book.
Faebei
Amazing that Mr. Trainor is both a physicist and an Episcopal Minister.
He can bring insight like no other to the worlds of both Science and Religion and bridge the two with insight and humor.
Thank you so much for writing this! Much needed in this day and age.
Grasp: Making Sense of Science and Spirituality