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by Thomas A. Carlson,Jean-Luc Marion

eBook God Without Being (Religion and Postmodernism Series) download ISBN: 0226505405
Author: Thomas A. Carlson,Jean-Luc Marion
Publisher: University of Chicago Press (January 15, 1991)
Language: English
Pages: 284
ePub: 1658 kb
Fb2: 1601 kb
Rating: 4.6
Other formats: docx lit mobi doc
Category: Religious
Subcategory: Religious Studies

Jean-Luc Marion is one of the world’s foremost philosophers of religion as well as one of the leading Catholic thinkers .

Jean-Luc Marion is one of the world’s foremost philosophers of religion as well as one of the leading Catholic thinkers of modern times. Chérif (2008) The Indiscrete Image: Infinitude and Creation of the Human by Thomas A. Carlson (2008).

Jean-Luc Marion advances a controversial argument for a God free of all .

Jean-Luc Marion advances a controversial argument for a God free of all categories of Being. God, for Marion and these mystics, cannot be rendered as an object, either physical or conceptual, but instead surpasses all objectivity, all beings, even being itself. God, in this thought, is radically transcendent. I would say this book is essential reading for anyone who wants to grapple seriously with the continental philosophy of religion - however, readers should be familiar with some Thomistic philosophy and phenomenology (especially Heidegger) before diving in, otherwise Marion's critique will not make any sense.

Jean-Luc Marion advances a controversial argument for a God free of all categories of Being

Jean-Luc Marion advances a controversial argument for a God free of all categories of Being. Taking a characteristically postmodern stance, Marion challenges a fundamental premise of both metaphysics and neo-Thomist theology: that God, before all else, must be. Rather, he locates a "God without Being" in the realm of agape, of Christian charity or love. This volume, the first translation into English of the work of this leading Catholic philosopher, offers a contemporary perspective on the nature of God. "An immensely thoughtful book. It promises a rich harvest.

Jean-Luc Marion (born 3 July 1946) is a French philosopher and Roman Catholic theologian. Marion is a former student of Jacques Derrida whose work is informed by patristic and mystical theology, phenomenology, and modern philosophy. Much of his academic work has dealt with Descartes and phenomenologists like Martin Heidegger and Edmund Husserl, but also religion.

Jean-Luc Marion is one of the world's foremost philosophers of religion as well as one of the leading Catholic thinkers of modern times

Jean-Luc Marion is one of the world's foremost philosophers of religion as well as one of the leading Catholic thinkers of modern times.

Religion and Postmodernism. Jean-Luc Marion advances a controversial argument for a God free of all categories of Being. By (author) Jean-Luc Marion, Translated by Thomas A. Carlson, Foreword by David Tracy. Thomas A. Carlson is professor of religious studies at the University of California, Santa Barbara, and the author of The Indiscrete Image: Infinitude and Creation of the Human, also published by the University of Chicago Press.

God Without Being book

God Without Being book. Jean-Luc Marion advances a controversial argument for a God free. Marion concludes his eighth and final chapter with a reflection on Thomas Aquinas's naming of God as esse, a name the school of thought which bears his name twisted into something Thomas himself never intended.

Series Title: Religion and Postmodernism. Publisher: University of Chicago Press. Author: Jean-Luc Marion. Street Date: July 1, 2012. Jean-Luc Marion is professor of philosophy at the Universit� Paris-Sorbonne (Paris IV), and the John Nuveen Distinguished Professor in the Divinity School and professor in the Committee on Social Thought and the Department of Philosophy at the University of Chicago.

Jean-Luc Marion is one of the world’s foremost philosophers of religion as well as one of the leading Catholic thinkers of modern times. In God Without Being, Marion challenges a fundamental premise of traditional philosophy, theology, and metaphysics: that God, before all else, must be. Taking a characteristically postmodern stance and engaging in passionate dialogue with Heidegger, he locates a God without Being in the realm of agape, or Christian charity and love. If God is love, Marion contends, then God loves before he actually is.

Jean-Luc Marion is one of the leading Catholic thinkers of our time: a formidable authority on Descartes and a major .

Jean-Luc Marion is one of the leading Catholic thinkers of our time: a formidable authority on Descartes and a major scholar in the philosophy of religion.

Jean-Luc Marion advances a controversial argument for a God free of all categories of Being. Taking a characteristically postmodern stance, Marion challenges a fundamental premise of both metaphysics and neo-Thomist theology: that God, before all else, must be. Rather, he locates a "God without Being" in the realm of agape, of Christian charity or love.This volume, the first translation into English of the work of this leading Catholic philosopher, offers a contemporary perspective on the nature of God."An immensely thoughtful book. . . . It promises a rich harvest. Marion's highly original treatment of the idol and the icon, the Eucharist, boredom and vanity, conversion and prayer takes theological and philosophical discussions to a new level."—Norman Wirzba, Christian Century
Comments: (7)
Warianys
Jean-Luc Marion's text is a destruction and deconstruction of philosophical idols. His thesis is fairly simple but profound: discourse on "being," that God before all else has to be (2). This is not yet the problem, however. As metaphysics developed, God become confused with being. Eventually, theologians and philosophers found that God was conceivable to the degree that metaphysics understood him. In short, metaphysics limited God (34). How then does one speak of God? Does suggesting that God is without being mean that God doesn't exist? No, for Marion suggests that before God "is," he gives. He comes to us in the Eucharist.

Marion rightly notes that philosophical talk about God is often idolatrous. Metaphysics created God after its own image. This leads into Marion's discussion of the "idol and the icon." (The next 150 pages are remarkably dense.) Marion starts off well but it is hard to see how he doesn't beg the question and also what he is actually trying to say. I like his discussion on "the icon." At surface level it is a good meditation on Christian aesthetics. But one gets the impression that Marion is not using "icon" in the sense that the Orthodox use it (though at times he is). Marion says the idol's gaze is wrong because it freezes on the watcher, but the icon is actually looking at him who is looking at me. The icon's gaze pierces reality. Okay, I agree but how is this statement not begging the question? Marion never made it clear how the icon's gaze doesn't deconstruct back to the idol's gaze.

Marion later moves into a moving discussion on Christian hermeneutics. More so than most theologians, Marion is keen to the challenges that Derrida and Nietzsche pose to Christianity--and to the opportunities available. The problem is the "gap" between text and reality. One can read of the Easter "event," but one is only reading of it. One is still removed from the event. A Christ-hermeneutics, however, bridges the gap between text and reality in the Eucharist (150). A fascinating discussion with much passion and promise, but one wishes that Marion would have spent more time on this.

Conclusion
This book started off well with references to Gilson's work on "Being" as well as other moves in Thomism. And the thesis is sound and simple enough. But even those readers who are well-read in philosophy will wonder what Marion is trying to say. This book could have easily been 80 pages long and the reader would not be at a loss. Marion spent too little time on the clear parts and too much time on the dense parts (without making them clearer). Still, there are many good meditations and it is worth re-reading parts of the book.
Steelraven
In God without Being, French Theologian Jean-Luc Marion offers a controversial thesis about how to think God with categories, including the category of Being. Beginning with an important and enlightening distinction between the idol and the icon, Marion goes on to argue that most "conceptual" understandings of God (i.e., causa sui, prima causa, moral god, etc.) actually constitute idolatries, because they essentially limit the divine to the scope of the human gaze. This is, in Marion's view, the quintessential manufacture of God in the image of humans.

In following chapters, Marion attempts to develop an account of God's self-revelation that would allow us to avoid the traps of conceptual idolatry and think "God without being." For this project, Marion settles on the notion of "giveness" (French: "donation"). In Marion's view, we can think of a God free of all categories (including the category of being) only if we think of God as pure gift--a gift given without any horizon except the gift itself (phenomenologists take note). To flesh out this concept of giveness (i.e., the God who trangresses Being), Marion introduces the notion of love--an idea which, in his view, is still conceptually free enough to allow us to think God without inevitably falling into idolatry. Thus, with the God who "gives" himself as "agape," Marion believes he has found a way of thinking of God without recourse to the category of being--and more importantly, without the erection of a conceptual idol.

This text is profound in every sense of the word and merits numerous rereadings. In fact, anyone who wants to be conversant with "cutting-edge" Christian theology at the beginning of the 21st century will need to know this book well.

That said, Marion's language is often dense and, quite frankly, obscure. The sentences are long and jargon-filled, and the precise structure of his arguments is not always clear. In any case, however, God Without Being merits the attention it has received. A close, reflective reading will not go unrewarded.

Adam Glover